publish.UP | Potsdam Publication Portal

File Formats

For every document to be published on the Institutional Repository, it is necessary to submit the files via the submission form. Please read below which presentation and creation formats are necessary or preferred for publication. Furthermore, you will find information on the standardized archive formats which guarantee the longterm readability of your document.


Content

1 Presentation Formats
1.1 PDF
1.2 HTML

2 Creation Formats
2.1 Using Format Templates
2.2 Colour Management
2.3 Requirements for the Submission of Common Creation Formats
2.3.1 Adobe InDesign
2.3.2 Microsoft Word
2.3.3 Libre-/OpenOffice
2.3.4 LaTeX

3 Archive Formats
3.1 PDF/A (ISO 19005-1:2005)
3.2 ODF (ISO/IEC 26300:2006)
3.3 XHTML

1 Presentation Formats

Presentation formats are the file formats in which the documents are published on the internet via the Institutional Repository.

1.1 PDF

The publication of digital documents on the Institutional Repository as a rule occurs in PDF (Portable Document Format). A document should generally consist of a single PDF file. The Content should only be separated into multiple files in exceptional cases of very large documents,
e. g. by separating the main part of a work from the appendix.

The university press accepts PDF files which conform to the archiving format PDF/A (ISO 19005-1:2005) or the printing standard format PDF/X-3 or PDF/X-4. PDF/A is a stable, internationally accepted ISO standard for long-term preservation since September 2005. A document conforming to PDF/A must reproduce its content on different computers with different operating systems and in different printing environments in a visually identical way. Therefore, all the fonts and the information on the colour profile have to be embedded in the document. Free and proprietary tools are available for the creation, processing and validation of PDF/A documents. A similar situation holds for the PDF/X standards for the printing industry.

Files conforming to PDF/A and PDF/X can be created for example with Adobe Acrobat Professional or the free PDFCreator. Many typesetting programmes already provide a direct export into these formats as well, e. g. OpenOffice.org (from version 3.0), Adobe Indesign CS 3, Corel Draw Graphics Suite X4 or Microsoft Office 2007 (from Service Pack 2). Please learn about the possibilities of your software (e. g. by consulting the help pages or printing options of your programme).

Please find information on the conversion of files in the tutorial on PDF creation.

1.2 HTML

Documents in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) can also be published on the Institutional Repository. HTML is the standard presentation format for documents on the internet. HTML and XHTML conforming to the W3C is published on the Institutional Repository:

Current HTML standards
  • HTML 4.01 (24th December 1999)
  • XHTML 1.1 (31st May 2001)

Source code conforming to the respective strict.dtd is published preferentially.

The use of XHTML permits to embed process-based application information into the document, e. g. by embedding bibliographic micro formats or contact information (FOAF – Friend of a Friend profiles in XML and RDF). Documents in XHTML are in addition to their display in a browser or for printing also suitable for archiving.

2 Creation Formats

Additionally, the publications are archived in their respective creation formats (native formats of the documents) and if applicable in an archive format for preservation and backup purposes. These files are stored in a part of the publication system which is not accessible to the public.

Formats of all established word processing programmes and document preparation systems (e. g. LaTeX) are accepted as creation formats. In case that your work consists of multiple files in the native format we would ask you to merge them into one ZIP or TAR.GZ file and upload it when you register your work. Please do not forget to submit the files linked to or embedded in the main document as for example images or tables and diagrams from spreadsheet programmes like Microsoft Excel as well as the fonts used (e. g. .ttf) if they do not belong to the default fonts of Microsoft Windows.

Please contact us if uploading is not possible because you have exceeded the maximum file size (> 50 MB).

2.1 Using Format Templates

Templates are used to assign structural elements (e. g. heading, caption, quotation, author etc.) to the respective logical text units. The logical markup is a description of the text document in form of semantic annotations. In this manner, the individual structural elements, as for example only the headings or all the bibliographical data, can be identified and processed automatically and without difficulty.

You can, for example, do the following in an effortless fashion:

  • Automatically create a table of contents from the headings or
  • change the layout of a structural element in the whole document through assigning a template.

2.2 Colour Management

For optimising the colour output it is advisable to make use of the possibilities of colour management already when you work on your document. Colour management makes possible the controlled display of colours on the computer screen and in print (e. g. in the way they are defined on a calibrated computer screen).

Please use the following profiles of the European Color Initiative (ECI) if possible:

  • media-independent colour profile: eciRGB_v2
  • CMYK profile for printing: ISOcoated_v2_eci

The icc profiles can be downloaded under http://www.eci.org/doku.php?id=de:downloads.

2.3 Requirements for the Submission of Common Creation Formats

2.3.1 Adobe InDesign

Please package the InDesign document before uploading it in the process of online registration (file > package). A folder is created that contains the InDesign document (.indd) as well as all files embedded in or linked to the main document (images, tables) and all necessary fonts.

2.3.2 Microsoft Word

Please upload all Word documents (file extensions .DOC, .DOCX or .ODT) on the server. In case that you have divided your chapters into individual files, you can merge them into a single ZIP archive. Please do not forget to submit the files linked to or embedded in the main document as for example images or tables and diagrams from spreadsheet programmes like Microsoft Excel as well as the fonts used (e. g. .TTF) if they do not belong to the default fonts of Microsoft Windows.

Please use formatting templates from the beginning if you are writing with Microsoft Word.

2.3.3 Libre-/OpenOffice

Please upload all Star/OpenOffice documents (file extension .ODT) on the server. In case that you have divided your chapters into individual files, you can merge them into a single ZIP archive. Please do not forget to submit the files linked to or embedded in the main document as for example images or tables and diagrams from spreadsheet programmes like Microsoft Excel as well as the fonts used (e. g. .TTF) if they do not belong to the default fonts of Microsoft Windows.

2.3.4 LaTeX

Please submit all the files necessary for compiling a new output format merged into a single ZIP or TAR.GZ compressed container file. It is especially necessary for us to receive your image files, all TeX and bibTeX files and if applicable additional STY and font files.

3. Archive Formats

Along with the publication on the Institutional Repository, the university press assumes responsibility for the long-term accessibility and machine readability of the electronic documents published. File formats become obsolete quickly. As they cannot be used by the general public anymore once they have been superseded by new technology, standards have been developed to ensure long-term machine readability. These formats are based on standards like PDF/A or ODF and are generally encoded in XML (eXtended Markup Language).

The university press seeks to archive all documents on the Institutional Repository in an open, standardised file format in the long term. You can support us in this effort by helping us with the creation of these archive formats or submitting them by yourself. The following formats would be suitable from the present point of view:

3.1 PDF/A (ISO 19005-1:2005)

PDF/A is a stable, internationally accepted ISO standard for long-term preservation since September 2005. A document conforming to PDF/A must reproduce its content on different computers with different operating systems and in different printing environments in a visually identical way. Therefore, all the fonts and the information on the colour profile have to be embedded in the document. A PDF/A-conformant document reproduces the original layout on screen and in print. It also meets the necessary conditions for conserving the information contained in the document.

Please find instructions for creating PDF files conforming to PDF/A in the tutorial on PDF creation.

3.2 ODF (ISO/IEC 26300:2006)

(Open Document Format)

The Open Document Format is an open standard for file formats of office documents like texts, tables, presentations, drawings and charts. ODF features the integration of existing standards as for example support for the W3C standard RDF, ISO standards for information on dates, time, places and languages as well as MathML for representing mathematical formula or SVG for vector graphics.

ODF is supported by a multitude of word processing programmes by now, OpenOffice and Microsoft Office 2007 (from SP 2) among others.

Please save your document as .odt file and upload it in addition to your original files when registering your work on our server.

3.3 XHTML

(eXtensible Hypertext Markup Language)

The W3C standard XHTML is an XML-based markup language for structuring and semantically annotating content like texts, images and hyperlinks in documents. XHTML documents have to be valid, i. e. they have to be checked against the respective document type definition (DTD) of XHTML or the standardised schema file. Documents in the XHTML format are optimised for display in a browser or in print as well as for archiving.

It becomes easier to convert documents into the archive formats mentioned if they are well-structured. We therefore recommend that you work with format templates

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