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The timing of island effects in nonnative sentence processing

  • Using the eye-movement monitoring technique in two reading comprehension experiments, this study investigated the timing of constraints on wh-dependencies (so-called island constraints) in first- and second-language (L1 and L2) sentence processing. The results show that both L1 and L2 speakers of English are sensitive to extraction islands during processing, suggesting that memory storage limitations affect L1 and L2 comprehenders in essentially the same way. Furthermore, these results show that the timing of island effects in L1 compared to L2 sentence comprehension is affected differently by the type of cue (semantic fit versus filled gaps) signaling whether dependency formation is possible at a potential gap site. Even though L1 English speakers showed immediate sensitivity to filled gaps but not to lack of semantic fit, proficient German-speaking learners of English as a L2 showed the opposite sensitivity pattern. This indicates that initial wh-dependency formation in L2 processing is based on semantic feature matching rather thanUsing the eye-movement monitoring technique in two reading comprehension experiments, this study investigated the timing of constraints on wh-dependencies (so-called island constraints) in first- and second-language (L1 and L2) sentence processing. The results show that both L1 and L2 speakers of English are sensitive to extraction islands during processing, suggesting that memory storage limitations affect L1 and L2 comprehenders in essentially the same way. Furthermore, these results show that the timing of island effects in L1 compared to L2 sentence comprehension is affected differently by the type of cue (semantic fit versus filled gaps) signaling whether dependency formation is possible at a potential gap site. Even though L1 English speakers showed immediate sensitivity to filled gaps but not to lack of semantic fit, proficient German-speaking learners of English as a L2 showed the opposite sensitivity pattern. This indicates that initial wh-dependency formation in L2 processing is based on semantic feature matching rather than being structurally mediated as in L1 comprehension.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Claudia FelserORCiDGND, Ian CunningsORCiD, Claire Batterham, Harald ClahsenORCiDGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-415179
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-41517
ISSN:1866-8364
Parent Title (English):Postprints der Universität Potsdam Humanwissenschaftliche Reihe
Series (Serial Number):Postprints der Universität Potsdam : Humanwissenschaftliche Reihe (526)
Document Type:Postprint
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2019/02/12
Year of Completion:2012
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Release Date:2019/02/12
Tag:2nd-language; comprehension; constraints; dependencies; empty categories; english; garden-paths; grammar; plausibility; trace positions
Pagenumber:32
Last Page:526
Source:Studies in Second Language Acquisition 34 (2012) pp. 67–98 DOI: 10.1017/S0272263111000507
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:4 Sprache / 40 Sprache / 400 Sprache
Peer Review:Referiert
Publication Way:Open Access
Grantor:Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht
Notes extern:Bibliographieeintrag der Originalveröffentlichung/Quelle