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Genetic population structure of the Fire-bellied toad Bombina bombina in an area of high population density implications for conservation

  • In this study, we report the genetic population structure of the Fire-bellied toad Bombina bombina in Brandenburg (East Germany) in the context of conservation. We analysed 298 samples originating from 11 populations in Brandenburg using mitochondrial control region sequences and six polymorphic microsatellite loci. For comparison, we included one population each from Poland and Ukraine into our analysis. Within Brandenburg, we detected a moderate variability in the mitochondrial control region (19 different haplotypes) and at microsatellite loci (9-12 alleles per locus). These polymorphisms revealed a clear population structure among toads in Brandenburg, despite a relatively high overall population density and the moderate size of single populations (100-2000 individuals). The overall genetic population structure is consistent with a postglacial colonization from South East-Europe and a subsequent population expansion. Based on genetic connectivity, we infer Management Units (MUs) as targets for conservation. Our genetic surveyIn this study, we report the genetic population structure of the Fire-bellied toad Bombina bombina in Brandenburg (East Germany) in the context of conservation. We analysed 298 samples originating from 11 populations in Brandenburg using mitochondrial control region sequences and six polymorphic microsatellite loci. For comparison, we included one population each from Poland and Ukraine into our analysis. Within Brandenburg, we detected a moderate variability in the mitochondrial control region (19 different haplotypes) and at microsatellite loci (9-12 alleles per locus). These polymorphisms revealed a clear population structure among toads in Brandenburg, despite a relatively high overall population density and the moderate size of single populations (100-2000 individuals). The overall genetic population structure is consistent with a postglacial colonization from South East-Europe and a subsequent population expansion. Based on genetic connectivity, we infer Management Units (MUs) as targets for conservation. Our genetic survey identified MUs, within which human infrastructure is currently preventing any genetic exchange. We also detect an unintentional translocation from South East to North West Brandenburg, presumably in the course of fish stocking activities. Provided suitable conservation measures are taken, Brandenburg should continue to harbor large populations of this critically endangered species.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Nicola Dolgener, Christiane Schröder, N. Schneeweiss, Ralph TiedemannORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10750-012-1016-1
ISSN:0018-8158
Parent Title (English):Hydrobiologia : acta hydrobiologica, hydrographica, limnologica et protistologica
Publisher:Springer
Place of publication:Dordrecht
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2012
Year of Completion:2012
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:Conservation genetics; Fire-bellied toad; Fragmentation; Microsatellites; Mitochondrial DNA; Translocation
Volume:689
Issue:1
Page Number:10
First Page:111
Last Page:120
Funder:Ministerium fur Wissenschaft; Forschung und Kultur Brandenburg; University of Potsdam
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert