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Variable and invariable proportions in the ontogenesis of the human face

  • The human face shows individual features and features that are characteristic for sex and age (the loss of childlike characteristics during maturation). The analysis of facial dimensions is essential for identifying individual features also for forensic issues. The analysis of facial proportions was performed on photogrammetric data from front views of 125 children. The data were pooled from 2 different studies. The children's data were obtained from a longitudinal study and reduced by random generator to ensure the data of adults from a separate cross-sectional study. We applied principal component analysis on photogrammetric facial proportions of 169 individuals: 125 children (63 boys and 62 girls) aged 2-7 years and 44 adults (18 men and 26 women) aged 18-65 years. Facial proportions depend on age and sex. Three components described age: (1) proportions of facial height to head height, (2) proportions that involve endocanthal breadth, and (3) bigonial to bizygonial proportions. Proportions that associate with sex are connectedThe human face shows individual features and features that are characteristic for sex and age (the loss of childlike characteristics during maturation). The analysis of facial dimensions is essential for identifying individual features also for forensic issues. The analysis of facial proportions was performed on photogrammetric data from front views of 125 children. The data were pooled from 2 different studies. The children's data were obtained from a longitudinal study and reduced by random generator to ensure the data of adults from a separate cross-sectional study. We applied principal component analysis on photogrammetric facial proportions of 169 individuals: 125 children (63 boys and 62 girls) aged 2-7 years and 44 adults (18 men and 26 women) aged 18-65 years. Facial proportions depend on age and sex. Three components described age: (1) proportions of facial height to head height, (2) proportions that involve endocanthal breadth, and (3) bigonial to bizygonial proportions. Proportions that associate with sex are connected with nasal distances and nasal to bizygonial distances. Twenty-three percent of the variance, particularly variance that are connected with proportions of lower and middle face heights to head height, do neither depend on sex nor on age and thus appear useful for screening purposes, eg, for dysmorphic genetic syndromes.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Christiane Scheffler
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e31826d07a3
ISSN:1049-2275 (print)
Parent Title (English):The journal of craniofacial surgery : an international journal dedicated to the practice of the art and science of craniofacial surgery ; official publication of the American Association of Pediatric Plastic Surgeons
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication:Philadelphia
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2013
Year of Completion:2013
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:Human face; face proportions; ontogenesis; principal component analysis
Volume:24
Issue:1
Pagenumber:5
First Page:237
Last Page:241
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert