The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 6 of 33
Back to Result List

Formation and evolution of channel steps and their role for sediment dynamics in a steep mountain stream

Formation und Evolution von Bachstufen und ihr Einfluss auf die Sedimentdynamik eines steilen Gebirgseinzugsgebietes

  • Steep mountain channels are an important component of the fluvial system. On geological timescales, they shape mountain belts and counteract tectonic uplift by erosion. Their channels are strongly coupled to hillslopes and they are often the main source of sediment transported downstream to low-gradient rivers and to alluvial fans, where commonly settlements in mountainous areas are located. Hence, mountain streams are the cause for one of the main natural hazards in these regions. Due to climate change and a pronounced populating of mountainous regions the attention given to this threat is even growing. Although quantitative studies on sediment transport have significantly advanced our knowledge on measuring and calibration techniques we still lack studies of the processes within mountain catchments. Studies examining the mechanisms of energy and mass exchange on small temporal and spatial scales in steep streams remain sparse in comparison to low-gradient alluvial channels. In the beginning of this doctoral project, a vastSteep mountain channels are an important component of the fluvial system. On geological timescales, they shape mountain belts and counteract tectonic uplift by erosion. Their channels are strongly coupled to hillslopes and they are often the main source of sediment transported downstream to low-gradient rivers and to alluvial fans, where commonly settlements in mountainous areas are located. Hence, mountain streams are the cause for one of the main natural hazards in these regions. Due to climate change and a pronounced populating of mountainous regions the attention given to this threat is even growing. Although quantitative studies on sediment transport have significantly advanced our knowledge on measuring and calibration techniques we still lack studies of the processes within mountain catchments. Studies examining the mechanisms of energy and mass exchange on small temporal and spatial scales in steep streams remain sparse in comparison to low-gradient alluvial channels. In the beginning of this doctoral project, a vast amount of experience and knowledge of a steep stream in the Swiss Prealps had to be consolidated in order to shape the principal aim of this research effort. It became obvious, that observations from within the catchment are underrepresented in comparison to experiments performed at the catchment’s outlet measuring fluxes and the effects of the transported material. To counteract this imbalance, an examination of mass fluxes within the catchment on the process scale was intended. Hence, this thesis is heavily based on direct field observations, which are generally rare in these environments in quantity and quality. The first objective was to investigate the coupling of the channel with surrounding hillslopes, the major sources of sediment. This research, which involved the monitoring of the channel and adjacent hillslopes, revealed that alluvial channel steps play a key role in coupling of channel and hillslopes. The observations showed that hillslope stability is strongly associated with the step presence and an understanding of step morphology and stability is therefore crucial in understanding sediment mobilization. This finding refined the way we think about the sediment dynamics in steep channels and motivated continued research of the step dynamics. However, soon it became obvious that the technological basis for developing field tests and analyzing the high resolution geometry measured in the field was not available. Moreover, for many geometrical quantities in mountain channels definitions and a clear scientific standard was not available. For example, these streams are characterized by a high spatial variability of the channel banks, preventing straightforward calculations of the channel width without a defined reference. Thus, the second and inevitable part of this thesis became the development and evaluation of scientific tools in order to investigate the geometrical content of the study reach thoroughly. The developed framework allowed the derivation of various metrics of step and channel geometry which facilitated research on the a large data set of observations of channel steps. In the third part, innovative, physically-based metrics have been developed and compared to current knowledge on step formation, suggested in the literature. With this analyses it could be demonstrated that the formation of channel steps follow a wide range of hydraulic controls. Due to the wide range of tested parameters channel steps observed in a natural stream were attributed to different mechanisms of step formation, including those based on jamming and those based on key-stones. This study extended our knowledge on step formation in a steep stream and harmonized different, often time seen as competing, processes of step formation. This study was based on observations collected at one point in time. In the fourth part of this project, the findings of the snap-shot observations were extended in the temporal dimension and the derived concepts have been utilized to investigate reach-scale step patterns in response to large, exceptional flood events. The preliminary results of this work based on the long-term analyses of 7 years of long profile surveys showed that the previously observed channel-hillslope mechanism is the responsible for the short-term response of step formation. The findings of the long-term analyses of step patterns drew a bow to the initial observations of a channel-hillslope system which allowed to join the dots in the dynamics of steep stream. Thus, in this thesis a broad approach has been chosen to gain insights into the complex system of steep mountain rivers. The effort includes in situ field observations (article I), the development of quantitative scientific tools (article II), the reach-scale analyses of step-pool morphology (article III) and its temporal evolution (article IV). With this work our view on the processes within the catchment has been advanced towards a better mechanistic understanding of these fluvial system relevant to improve applied scientific work.show moreshow less
  • Gebirgsbäche sind stark gekoppelt mit angrenzenden Hängen, welche eine Hauptquelle von Sediment darstellen. Dieses Sediment wird durch erosive Prozesse weiter im fluvialen System stromabwärts transportiert, häufig auch in Bereiche alpiner Besiedlung. Das transportierte Sediment kann dort verheerende Schäden an Gebäuden und Infrastruktur anrichten. Daher stellen Gebirgsbäche eine Hauptursache für Naturgefahren in steilen Regionen dar, welche durch den Wandel des Klimas und die fortschreitende Besiedlung durch den Menschen noch verstärkt werden. Wenngleich quantitative Studien unser Wissen über Mess- und Kalibrierungstechniken zur Erfassung von Sedimenttransport erweitert haben, so sind doch viele Prozesse innerhalb der Einzugsgebiete in Hinblick auf Erosion und Sedimentverfügbarkeit weitgehend unerforscht. So stellen Beobachtungen von Mechanismen von Energie- und Massenaustausch auf kleinen räumlichen und zeitlichen Skalen innerhalb steiler Gebirgseinzugsgebiete eine Ausname dar. Diese Doktorarbeit basiert auf hoch-qualitativenGebirgsbäche sind stark gekoppelt mit angrenzenden Hängen, welche eine Hauptquelle von Sediment darstellen. Dieses Sediment wird durch erosive Prozesse weiter im fluvialen System stromabwärts transportiert, häufig auch in Bereiche alpiner Besiedlung. Das transportierte Sediment kann dort verheerende Schäden an Gebäuden und Infrastruktur anrichten. Daher stellen Gebirgsbäche eine Hauptursache für Naturgefahren in steilen Regionen dar, welche durch den Wandel des Klimas und die fortschreitende Besiedlung durch den Menschen noch verstärkt werden. Wenngleich quantitative Studien unser Wissen über Mess- und Kalibrierungstechniken zur Erfassung von Sedimenttransport erweitert haben, so sind doch viele Prozesse innerhalb der Einzugsgebiete in Hinblick auf Erosion und Sedimentverfügbarkeit weitgehend unerforscht. So stellen Beobachtungen von Mechanismen von Energie- und Massenaustausch auf kleinen räumlichen und zeitlichen Skalen innerhalb steiler Gebirgseinzugsgebiete eine Ausname dar. Diese Doktorarbeit basiert auf hoch-qualitativen Feldbeobachtungen in einem schweizer Gebirgsbach um Forschungsfragen in Hinblick auf die Sediementdyanmik zu behandeln. Das erste Ziel war es, die Gerinne-Hang-Kopplung zu erforschen und zu verstehen, um mögliche Sedimentquellen zu identifizieren, sowie die Mechanismen und Prozesse der Sedimentgenerierung in den Kontext der allgemeinen Dynamik von Gebirgsbächen zu bringen. Die erste Studie, welche auf visuellen Beobachtungen basiert, offenbarte eine Schlüsselrolle von Bachstufen in der Gerinne-Hang-Kopplung. Auf dieser Grundlage wurde ein konzeptuelles Modell entwickelt (Artikel I): durch die Erosion von Bachstufen werden angrenzende Hänge destabilisiert und ermöglichen anhaltenden Sedimenteintrag. Diese Forschung regte eine genauere Beobachtung der räumlichen und zeitlichen Evolution von Bachstufen an. Die weitere Forschung erforderte jedoch neue technologische Werkzeuge und Methoden welche zunächst in dieser Doktorarbeit eigens entwickelt wurden (Artikel II). Mit diesen Werkzeugen wurde dann ein Datensatz eingemessener Bachstufen in Hinblick auf den Formationsprozess analysiert (Artikel III). Mit dieser Analyse konnten verschiedene Stufenbildungstheorien überprüft und und zwei dominante Mechanismen verifiziert werden: Bachstufen formen sich in engen und verengenden Bachabchnitten durch Verklemmung, sowie in breiten und breiter werdenden Abschnitten durch die Ablagerung von Schlüsselsteinen. Durch diese Beobachtung wurde unser Wissen über Stufenbildung erweitert indem verschiedene hypothetisierte Mechanismen in einem Gebirgsbach harmonisiert wurden. Zu guter Letzt wurde diese Punktbeobachtung schließlich in den zeitlichen Kontext gesetzt, indem die Muster von Bachstufen über 7 Jahre nach einem hydrologischen Großereignis in 2010 untersucht wurden (Artikel IV). Die vorläufigen Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Großereignisse einen erheblichen Einfluss auf die Gerinnebreite haben: sowohl die räumlich gemittelte Gerinnebreite, als auch die mittlere Gerinnebreite an Bachstufen ist unmittelbar nach dem Großereignis deutlich erhöht. Weiterhin ist die relative Anzahl der Bachstufen welche durch Schlüsselsteine erzeugt werden größer nach dem Großereignis. Dies deutet darauf hin, dass der zuerst beobachtete Mechanismus der Gerinne-Hang-Kopplung (Artikel I) verantwortlich ist für die zeitliche Evolution der Bachstufen nach Großereignissen (Artikel IV).show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Antonius GollyORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-411728
Advisor:Niels Hovius
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2017
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2018/05/24
Release Date:2018/07/04
Tag:Bachstufen; Gebirgsbäche; Geomorphologie; Gerinne-Hang-Kopplung; Geschiebetransport; Naturgefahren
bedload transport; channel steps; channel-hillslope coupling; geomorphology; mountain rivers; natural hazards
Pagenumber:180
Organizational units:Extern
Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht