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Relationships between trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, and balance performance in older adults

  • This study investigated associations between variables of trunk muscle strength (TMS), spinal mobility, and balance in seniors. Thirty-four seniors (sex: 18 female, 16 male; age: 70 +/- 4 years; activity level: 13 +/- 7 hr/week) were tested for maximal isometric strength (MIS) of the trunk extensors, flexors, lateral flexors, rotators, spinal mobility, and steady-state, reactive, and proactive balance. Significant correlations were detected between all measures of TMS and static steady-state balance (r = .43.57, p < .05). Significant correlations were observed between specific measures of TMS and dynamic steady-state balance (r = .42.55, p < .05). No significant correlations were found between all variables of TMS and reactive/proactive balance and between all variables of spinal mobility and balance. Regression analyses revealed that TMS explains between 1-33% of total variance of the respective balance parameters. Findings indicate that TMS is related to measures of steady-state balance which may imply that TMS promoting exercisesThis study investigated associations between variables of trunk muscle strength (TMS), spinal mobility, and balance in seniors. Thirty-four seniors (sex: 18 female, 16 male; age: 70 +/- 4 years; activity level: 13 +/- 7 hr/week) were tested for maximal isometric strength (MIS) of the trunk extensors, flexors, lateral flexors, rotators, spinal mobility, and steady-state, reactive, and proactive balance. Significant correlations were detected between all measures of TMS and static steady-state balance (r = .43.57, p < .05). Significant correlations were observed between specific measures of TMS and dynamic steady-state balance (r = .42.55, p < .05). No significant correlations were found between all variables of TMS and reactive/proactive balance and between all variables of spinal mobility and balance. Regression analyses revealed that TMS explains between 1-33% of total variance of the respective balance parameters. Findings indicate that TMS is related to measures of steady-state balance which may imply that TMS promoting exercises should be integrated in strength training for seniors.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author details:Urs GranacherORCiDGND, Andre Lacroix, Katrin Roettger, Albert Gollhofer, Thomas MuehlbauerORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1123/JAPA.2013-0108
ISSN:1063-8652
ISSN:1543-267X
Pubmed ID:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=24152575
Parent title (English):Journal of aging and physical activity
Publisher:Human Kinetics Publ.
Place of publishing:Champaign
Publication type:Article
Language:English
Year of first publication:2014
Year of completion:2014
Release date:2017/03/27
Tag:core; elderly; force; gait; physical performance; postural balance
Volume:22
Issue:4
Page number:9
First page:490
Last Page:498
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Strukturbereich Kognitionswissenschaften
Peer review:Referiert
Institution name at the time of the publication:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Exzellenzbereich Kognitionswissenschaften