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Suicide attempt rates and intervention effects in women of Turkish origin in Berlin

  • Purpose: Ethnic minority groups show elevated suicide attempt rates across Europe. Evidence suggests a similar trend for women of Turkish origin in Germany, yet data on suicidal behaviour in minorities in Germany is scarce. The objective was to examine rates of suicidal behaviour, underlying motives, and to explore the effectiveness of an intervention program. Methods: From 05/2009-09/2011, data on all suicide attempts among women of Turkish origin who presented at a hospital-based emergency unit in Berlin, Germany, were collected. A multi-modal intervention was conducted in 2010 and the effects of age, generation and the intervention on suicide attempt rates were examined. Results: At the start, the highest rate was found in women aged 18-24 years with 225.4 (95% CI = 208.8-242.0)/100,000. Adjustment disorder was the most prevalent diagnosis with 49.7% (n = 79), being more common in second-generation women (P = .004). Further analyses suggested an effect of the intervention in the youngest age group (trend change of beta = -1.25; PPurpose: Ethnic minority groups show elevated suicide attempt rates across Europe. Evidence suggests a similar trend for women of Turkish origin in Germany, yet data on suicidal behaviour in minorities in Germany is scarce. The objective was to examine rates of suicidal behaviour, underlying motives, and to explore the effectiveness of an intervention program. Methods: From 05/2009-09/2011, data on all suicide attempts among women of Turkish origin who presented at a hospital-based emergency unit in Berlin, Germany, were collected. A multi-modal intervention was conducted in 2010 and the effects of age, generation and the intervention on suicide attempt rates were examined. Results: At the start, the highest rate was found in women aged 18-24 years with 225.4 (95% CI = 208.8-242.0)/100,000. Adjustment disorder was the most prevalent diagnosis with 49.7% (n = 79), being more common in second-generation women (P = .004). Further analyses suggested an effect of the intervention in the youngest age group (trend change of beta = -1.25; P = .017). Conclusion: Our findings suggest a particularly high rate of suicide attempts by 18-24-year-old, second-generation women of Turkish origin in Berlin. Furthermore, our results suggest a trend change in suicide attempts in women aged 18-24 years related to a population-based intervention program. (C) 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Marion C. Aichberger, Amanda Heredia Montesinos, Zohra Bromand, Rahsan Yesil, Selver Temur-Erman, Michael Armin RappORCiDGND, Andreas Heinz, Meryam Schouler-Ocak
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2014.12.003
ISSN:0924-9338 (print)
ISSN:1778-3585 (online)
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=25596777
Parent Title (English):European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists
Publisher:Elsevier
Place of publication:Paris
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2015
Year of Completion:2015
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Incidence rates; Intervention study; Suicide attempt; Turkish migrants
Volume:30
Issue:4
Pagenumber:6
First Page:480
Last Page:485
Funder:German Federal Ministry for Education and Research [BMBF 01 EL0807]
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportwissenschaft
Peer Review:Referiert