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Biomimetic calcium phosphate mineralization with multifunctional elastin-like recombinamers

  • Biomimetic hybrid materials based on a polymeric and an inorganic component such as calcium phosphate are potentially useful for bone repair. The current study reports on a new approach toward biomimetic hybrid materials using a set of recombinamers (recombinant protein materials obtained from a synthetic gene) as crystallization additive for calcium phosphate. The recombinamers contain elements from elastin, an elastic structural protein, and statherin, a salivary protein. Via genetic engineering, the basic elastin sequence was modified with the SN(A)15 domain of statherin, whose interaction with calcium phosphate is well-established. These new materials retain the biocompatibility, "smart" nature, and desired mechanical behavior of the elastin-like recombinamer (ELR) family. Mineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF) in the presence of these recombinamers reveals surprising differences. Two of the polymers inhibit calcium phosphate deposition (although they contain the statherin segment). In contrast, the third polymer, which hasBiomimetic hybrid materials based on a polymeric and an inorganic component such as calcium phosphate are potentially useful for bone repair. The current study reports on a new approach toward biomimetic hybrid materials using a set of recombinamers (recombinant protein materials obtained from a synthetic gene) as crystallization additive for calcium phosphate. The recombinamers contain elements from elastin, an elastic structural protein, and statherin, a salivary protein. Via genetic engineering, the basic elastin sequence was modified with the SN(A)15 domain of statherin, whose interaction with calcium phosphate is well-established. These new materials retain the biocompatibility, "smart" nature, and desired mechanical behavior of the elastin-like recombinamer (ELR) family. Mineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF) in the presence of these recombinamers reveals surprising differences. Two of the polymers inhibit calcium phosphate deposition (although they contain the statherin segment). In contrast, the third polymer, which has a triblock structure, efficiently controls the calcium phosphate formation, yielding spherical hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with diameters from 1 to 3 nm after 1 week in SBF at 37 degrees C. However, at lower temperatures, no precipitation is observed with any of the polymers. The data thus suggest that the molecular design of ELRs containing statherin segments and the selection of an appropriate polymer structure are key parameters to obtain functional materials for the development of intelligent systems for hard tissue engineering and subsequent in vivo applications.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Susana Prieto, Andriy Shkilnyy, Claudia Rumplasch, Artur Ribeiro, F. Javier Arias, J. Carlos Rodriguez-Cabello, Andreas TaubertORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/bm200287c
ISSN:1525-7797 (print)
Parent Title (English):Biomacromolecules : an interdisciplinary journal focused at the interface of polymer science and the biological sciences
Publisher:American Chemical Society
Place of publication:Washington
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2011
Year of Completion:2011
Release Date:2017/03/26
Volume:12
Issue:5
Pagenumber:7
First Page:1480
Last Page:1486
Funder:EU; MICINN [MAT 2009-14195-C03-03, ACI2009-0890, MAT2010-15310, MAT2010-15982]; JCyL [VA034A09, VA030A08]; CIBER-BBN; Instituto de Salud Carlos III; University of Potsdam; Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces; MPI-KG
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Chemie
Peer Review:Referiert