• search hit 1 of 5
Back to Result List

Maternal stimulation in infancy predicts hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity in young men

  • Evidence from animal research has demonstrated the effect of early maternal care on the offspring's endocrine and behavioral stress response in adulthood. The present prospective study investigates, in humans, the long-term impact of maternal responsiveness and stimulation during early mother-child interaction on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol response to a psychosocial laboratory stressor in adulthood. The data are from an epidemiological cohort study of the long-term outcome of early risk factors assessed at birth. At age 3 months, mothers and infants were videotaped during a 10-min standardized nursing and playing situation and evaluated by trained raters for maternal stimulation and infant and maternal responsiveness. At age 19 years, 270 participants (146 females, 124 males) completed the Trier Social Stress Test. The results indicated that less maternal stimulation during early interaction at age 3 months predicted diminished plasma ACTH and cortisol increase in response to acute psychosocial stress in male, butEvidence from animal research has demonstrated the effect of early maternal care on the offspring's endocrine and behavioral stress response in adulthood. The present prospective study investigates, in humans, the long-term impact of maternal responsiveness and stimulation during early mother-child interaction on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol response to a psychosocial laboratory stressor in adulthood. The data are from an epidemiological cohort study of the long-term outcome of early risk factors assessed at birth. At age 3 months, mothers and infants were videotaped during a 10-min standardized nursing and playing situation and evaluated by trained raters for maternal stimulation and infant and maternal responsiveness. At age 19 years, 270 participants (146 females, 124 males) completed the Trier Social Stress Test. The results indicated that less maternal stimulation during early interaction at age 3 months predicted diminished plasma ACTH and cortisol increase in response to acute psychosocial stress in male, but not female offspring. In contrast, maternal responsiveness was found to be unrelated to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) reactivity. In accordance with the findings from animal research, the present study provides prospective evidence in humans of a long-term association between early maternal interaction behavior and the offspring's hormonal stress response in young adulthood, suggesting that poor maternal stimulation in early infancy may result in reduced HPA axis reactivity to an acute psychosocial stressor in males.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Brigitte Schmid, Arlette F. Buchmann, Patricia Trautmann-Villalba, Dorothea Blomeyer, Ulrich S. Zimmermann, Martin H. Schmidt, Günter EsserGND, Tobias Banaschewski, Manfred Laucht
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00702-013-0970-8
ISSN:0300-9564 (print)
Parent Title (English):Journal of neural transmission
Publisher:Springer
Place of publication:Wien
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2013
Year of Completion:2013
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:ACTH; Cortisol; HPA axis; Mother-infant interaction
Volume:120
Issue:8
Pagenumber:11
First Page:1247
Last Page:1257
Funder:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG); Federal Ministry for Education and Research as part of the 'Baden-Wuerttemberg Consortium for Addiction Research'; National Genome Research Network
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Psychologie
Peer Review:Referiert