• search hit 28 of 82
Back to Result List

Changes in monsoonal precipitation and atmospheric circulation during the Holocene reconstructed from stalagmites from Northeastern India

Veränderungen monsunalen Niederschlages und atmosphärischer Zirkulation während des Holozäns, rekonstruiert aus Stalagmiten aus Nordostindien

  • Recent years witnessed a vast advent of stalagmites as palaeoclimate archives. The multitude of geochemical and physical proxies and a promise of a precise and accurate age model greatly appeal to palaeoclimatologists. Although substantial progress was made in speleothem-based palaeoclimate research and despite high-resolution records from low-latitudinal regions, proving that palaeo-environmental changes can be archived on sub-annual to millennial time scales our comprehension of climate dynamics is still fragmentary. This is in particular true for the summer monsoon system on the Indian subcontinent. The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is an integral part of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). As this rainfall belt migrates northward during boreal summer, it brings monsoonal rainfall. ISM strength depends however on a variety of factors, including snow cover in Central Asia and oceanic conditions in the Indic and Pacific. Presently, many of the factors influencing the ISM are known, though their exact forcing mechanism and mutualRecent years witnessed a vast advent of stalagmites as palaeoclimate archives. The multitude of geochemical and physical proxies and a promise of a precise and accurate age model greatly appeal to palaeoclimatologists. Although substantial progress was made in speleothem-based palaeoclimate research and despite high-resolution records from low-latitudinal regions, proving that palaeo-environmental changes can be archived on sub-annual to millennial time scales our comprehension of climate dynamics is still fragmentary. This is in particular true for the summer monsoon system on the Indian subcontinent. The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is an integral part of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). As this rainfall belt migrates northward during boreal summer, it brings monsoonal rainfall. ISM strength depends however on a variety of factors, including snow cover in Central Asia and oceanic conditions in the Indic and Pacific. Presently, many of the factors influencing the ISM are known, though their exact forcing mechanism and mutual relations remain ambiguous. Attempts to make an accurate prediction of rainfall intensity and frequency and drought recurrence, which is extremely important for South Asian countries, resemble a puzzle game; all interaction need to fall into the right place to obtain a complete picture. My thesis aims to create a faithful picture of climate change in India, covering the last 11,000 ka. NE India represents a key region for the Bay of Bengal (BoB) branch of the ISM, as it is here where the monsoon splits into a northwestward and a northeastward directed arm. The Meghalaya Plateau is the first barrier for northward moving air masses and receives excessive summer rainfall, while the winter season is very dry. The proximity of Meghalaya to the Tibetan Plateau on the one hand and the BoB on the other hand make the study area a key location for investigating the interaction between different forcings that governs the ISM. A basis for the interpretation of palaeoclimate records, and a first important outcome of my thesis is a conceptual model which explains the observed pattern of seasonal changes in stable isotopes (d18O and d2H) in rainfall. I show that although in tropical and subtropical regions the amount effect is commonly called to explain strongly depleted isotope values during enhanced rainfall, alone it cannot account for observed rainwater isotope variability in Meghalaya. Monitoring of rainwater isotopes shows no expected negative correlation between precipitation amount and d18O of rainfall. In turn I find evidence that the runoff from high elevations carries an inherited isotopic signature into the BoB, where during the ISM season the freshwater builds a strongly depleted plume on top of the marine water. The vapor originating from this plume is likely to memorize' and transmit further very negative d18O values. The lack of data does not allow for quantication of this plume effect' on isotopes in rainfall over Meghalaya but I suggest that it varies on seasonal to millennial timescales, depending on the runoff amount and source characteristics. The focal point of my thesis is the extraction of climatic signals archived in stalagmites from NE India. High uranium concentration in the stalagmites ensured excellent age control required for successful high-resolution climate reconstructions. Stable isotope (d18O and d13C) and grey-scale data allow unprecedented insights into millennial to seasonal dynamics of the summer and winter monsoon in NE India. ISM strength (i. e. rainfall amount) is recorded in changes in d18Ostalagmites. The d13C signal, reflecting drip rate changes, renders a powerful proxy for dry season conditions, and shows similarities to temperature-related changes on the Tibetan Plateau. A sub-annual grey-scale profile supports a concept of lower drip rate and slower stalagmite growth during dry conditions. During the Holocene, ISM followed a millennial-scale decrease of insolation, with decadal to centennial failures resulting from atmospheric changes. The period of maximum rainfall and enhanced seasonality corresponds to the Holocene Thermal Optimum observed in Europe. After a phase of rather stable conditions, 4.5 kyr ago, the strengthening ENSO system dominated the ISM. Strong El Nino events weakened the ISM, especially when in concert with positive Indian Ocean dipole events. The strongest droughts of the last 11 kyr are recorded during the past 2 kyr. Using the advantage of a well-dated stalagmite record at hand I tested the application of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to detect sub-annual to sub-decadal changes in element concentrations in stalagmites. The development of a large ablation cell allows for ablating sample slabs of up to 22 cm total length. Each analyzed element is a potential proxy for different climatic parameters. Combining my previous results with the LAICP- MS-generated data shows that element concentration depends not only on rainfall amount and associated leaching from the soil. Additional factors, like biological activity and hydrogeochemical conditions in the soil and vadose zone can eventually affect the element content in drip water and in stalagmites. I present a theoretical conceptual model for my study site to explain how climatic signals can be transmitted and archived in stalagmite carbonate. Further, I establish a first 1500 year long element record, reconstructing rainfall variability. Additionally, I hypothesize that volcanic eruptions, producing large amounts of sulfuric acid, can influence soil acidity and hence element mobilization.show moreshow less
  • Stalagmiten erfuhren in den letzten Jahren vermehrt Aufmerksamkeit als bedeutende Paläoklima- Archive. Paläoklimatologen sind beeindruckt von der grossen Zahl geochemischer und physikalischer Indikatoren (Proxies) und der Möglichkeit, präzise absolute Altersmodelle zu erstellen. Doch obwohl substantielle Fortschritte in der speleothem-basierten Klimaforschung gemacht wurden, und trotz hochaufgelöster Archive aus niederen Breiten, welche zeigen, das Umweltveränderungen auf Zeitskalen von Jahren bis Jahrtausenden archiviert und rekonstruiert werden können, bleibt unser Verständnis der Klimadynamik fragmentarisch. Ganz besonders gilt dies für den Indischen Sommermonsun (ISM) auf dem Indischen Subkontinent. Der ISM ist heute als ein integraler Bestandteil der intertropischen Konvergenzzone verstanden. Sobald dieser Regengürtel während des borealen Sommer nordwärts migriert kann der ISM seine feuchten Luftmassen auf dem Asiatischen Festland entladen. Dabei hängt die Stärke des ISM von einer Vielzahl von Faktoren ab. Zu diesen gehören dieStalagmiten erfuhren in den letzten Jahren vermehrt Aufmerksamkeit als bedeutende Paläoklima- Archive. Paläoklimatologen sind beeindruckt von der grossen Zahl geochemischer und physikalischer Indikatoren (Proxies) und der Möglichkeit, präzise absolute Altersmodelle zu erstellen. Doch obwohl substantielle Fortschritte in der speleothem-basierten Klimaforschung gemacht wurden, und trotz hochaufgelöster Archive aus niederen Breiten, welche zeigen, das Umweltveränderungen auf Zeitskalen von Jahren bis Jahrtausenden archiviert und rekonstruiert werden können, bleibt unser Verständnis der Klimadynamik fragmentarisch. Ganz besonders gilt dies für den Indischen Sommermonsun (ISM) auf dem Indischen Subkontinent. Der ISM ist heute als ein integraler Bestandteil der intertropischen Konvergenzzone verstanden. Sobald dieser Regengürtel während des borealen Sommer nordwärts migriert kann der ISM seine feuchten Luftmassen auf dem Asiatischen Festland entladen. Dabei hängt die Stärke des ISM von einer Vielzahl von Faktoren ab. Zu diesen gehören die Schneedicke in Zentralasien im vorhergehenden Winter und ozeanische Bedingungen im Indischen und Pazifschen Ozean. Heute sind viele dieser Faktoren bekannt. Trotzdem bleiben deren Mechanismen und internen Verbindungen weiterhin mysteriös. Versuche, korrekte Vorhersagen zu Niederschlagsintensität und Häufigkeit oder zu Dürreereignissen zu erstellen ähneln einem Puzzle. All die verschiedenen Interaktionen müssen an die richtige Stelle gelegt werden, um ein sinnvolles Bild entstehen zu lassen. Meine Dissertation versucht, ein vertrauenswürdiges Bild des sich wandelnden Holozänen Klimas in Indien zu erstellen. NE Indien ist eine Schlüsselregion für den östlichen Arm des ISM, da sich hier der ISM in zwei Arme aufteilt, einen nordwestwärts und einen nordostwärts gerichteten. Das Meghalaya Plateau ist das erste Hindernis für die sich nordwärts bewegenden Luftmassen und erhält entsprechend exzessive Niederschläge während des Sommers. Die winterliche Jahreszeit dagegen ist sehr trocken. Die Nähe zum Tibetplateau einerseits und der Bucht von Bengalen andererseits determinieren die Schlüsselposition dieser Region für das Studium der Interaktionen der den ISM beeinflussenden Kräfte. Ein Fundament für die Interpretation der Paläoklimarecords und ein erstes wichtiges Ergebnis meiner Arbeit ist ein konzeptuelles Modell, welches die beobachteten saisonalen Veränderungen stabiler Isotope (d18O und d2H) im Niederschlag erklärt. Ich zeige, das obwohl in tropischen und subtropischen Regionen meist der amount effect zur Erklärung stark negativer Isotopenwerte während starker Niederschläge herangezogen wird, dieser allein nicht ausreicht, um die Isotopenvariabilität im Niederschlag Meghalaya's zu erklären. Die Langzeitbeobachtung der Regenwasserisotopie zeigt keine negative Korrelation zwischen Niederschlagsmenge und d18O. Es finden sich Hinweise, das der Abfluss aus den Hochgebirgsregionen Tibets und des Himalaya eine Isotopensignatur an das Oberflächenwasser der Bucht von Bengalen vererbt. Dort bildet sich aus isotopisch stark abgereicherten Wässern während des ISM eine Süsswasserlinse aus. Es ist wahrscheinlich, das Wasserdampf, der aus dieser Linse stammt, ein Isotopensignal aufgeprägt bekommt, welches abgereichertes d18O weitertransportiert. Der Mangel an Daten lässt es bisher leider nicht zu, quantitative Aussagen über den Einfluss dieses plume effect' auf Niederschläge in Meghalaya zu treffen. Es lässt sich allerdings vermuten, das dieser Einfluss auf saisonalen wie auch auf langen Zeitskalen variabel ist, abhängig vom Abfluss und der Quellencharacteristik. Der Fokus meiner Arbeit liegt in der Herauslösung klimatischer Signale aus nordostindischen Stalagmiten. Hohe Urankonzentrationen in diesen Stalagmiten erlaubt eine exzellente Alterskontrolle, die für hochauflösende Klimarekonstruktionen unerlässlich ist. Die stabilen Isotope (d18O und d13C), sowie Grauwertdaten, erlauben einmalige Einblicke in die Dynamik des Sommer und auch des Wintermonsun in NE Indien. Die ISM Stärke (d. h. Niederschlagsmenge) wird in Veränderungen in den d18Ostalagmites reflektiert. Das d13C Signal, welches Tropfratenänderungen speichert, dient als potenter Indikator für winterliche Trockenheitsbedingungen. Es zeigt Ähnlichkeit zu temperaturabhängigen Veränderungen auf dem Tibetplateau. Das sub-annuell aufgelöste Grauwertprofil stärkt das Konzept, das verminderte Tropfraten und langsameres Stalagmitenwachstum eine Folge von Trockenheit sind. Während des Holozäns folgte der ISM der jahrtausendelangen Verringerung der Insolation. Es finden sich aber ebenso rapide Anomalien, die aus atmosphärischen Veränderungen resultieren. Die Phase des höchsten Niederschlages und erhöhter Saisonalität korrespondiert mit dem Holozänen Thermalen Maximum. Nach einer Phase einigermassen stabilen Bedingungen begann vor ca. 4500 Jahren ENSO einen zunehmenden Einfluss auf den ISM auszuüben. Starke El Nino Ereignisse schwächen den ISM, besonders wenn diese zeitgleich mit positiven Indian Ocean Dipole Ereignissen auftreten. Die stärksten Dürren des gesamten Holozäns traten in den letzten 2000 Jahren auf. Um zusätzliche Informationen aus den hervorragenden Proben zu gewinnen nutzte ich die Vorteile der laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Diese erlaubt die Detektion sub-annueller bis sub-dekadischer Elementkonzentrationsveränderungen in Stalagmiten. Mittels einer neu entwickelten Ablationszelle konnten Proben von maximal 22 cm Länge untersucht werden. Jedes analysierte Element ist ein potentieller Träger einer Klimainformation. Die Kombination der früheren Ergebnisse mit denen der LA-IPC-MS zeigt, das die Elementkonzentrationen nicht nur von Niederschlagsveränderungen und assoziiertem Auswaschen aus dem Boden abhängen. Zusätzlich können auch die biologische Aktivität und hydrogeochemische Bedingungen in der vadosen Zone Einfluss auf die Elementzusammensetzung im Tropfwasser und in den Stalagmiten haben. Darum entwickelte ich ein theoretisches Modell für meinen Standort, um zu klären, wie Klimasignale von der Atmosphäre in die Höhle transportiert werden können. Ein anschliessend rekonstruierter 1500 Jahre langer Proxyrecord zeigt Niederschlagsvariabilität an. Zudem besteht die Möglichkeit, das Vulkaneruptionen, welche grosse Mengen an Schwefelsäure produzieren, eine Bodenversauerung verursachen und damit die Elementmobilisierung verstärken können.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Sebastian Franz Martin BreitenbachGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus-37807
Advisor:Gerald Haug
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2009
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2009/10/19
Release Date:2009/11/16
Tag:Bucht von Bengalen; Holozän; Indischer Sommermonsun; Stabile Isotope; Stalagmiten
Bay of Bengal; Indian Summer Monsoon; Laser ablation; stable isotopes; stalagmites
RVK - Regensburg Classification:TK 1025
RVK - Regensburg Classification:TP 6640
RVK - Regensburg Classification:TI 9000
RVK - Regensburg Classification:TF 04999
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Geowissenschaften
Extern / Extern
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, Weitergabe zu gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 Deutschland