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Reanalysis and semantic persistence in native and non-native garden-path recovery

  • We report the results from an eye-movement monitoring study investigating how native and non-native speakers of English process temporarily ambiguous sentences such as While the gentleman was eating the burgers were still being reheated in the microwave, in which an initially plausible direct-object analysis is first ruled out by a syntactic disambiguation (were) and also later on by semantic information (being reheated). Both participant groups showed garden-path effects at the syntactic disambiguation, with native speakers showing significantly stronger effects of ambiguity than non-native speakers in later eye-movement measures but equally strong effects in first-pass reading times. Ambiguity effects at the semantic disambiguation and in participants’ end-of-trial responses revealed that for both participant groups, the incorrect direct-object analysis was frequently maintained beyond the syntactic disambiguation. The non-native group showed weaker reanalysis effects at the syntactic disambiguation and was more likely toWe report the results from an eye-movement monitoring study investigating how native and non-native speakers of English process temporarily ambiguous sentences such as While the gentleman was eating the burgers were still being reheated in the microwave, in which an initially plausible direct-object analysis is first ruled out by a syntactic disambiguation (were) and also later on by semantic information (being reheated). Both participant groups showed garden-path effects at the syntactic disambiguation, with native speakers showing significantly stronger effects of ambiguity than non-native speakers in later eye-movement measures but equally strong effects in first-pass reading times. Ambiguity effects at the semantic disambiguation and in participants’ end-of-trial responses revealed that for both participant groups, the incorrect direct-object analysis was frequently maintained beyond the syntactic disambiguation. The non-native group showed weaker reanalysis effects at the syntactic disambiguation and was more likely to misinterpret the experimental sentences than the native group. Our results suggest that native language (L1) and non-native language (L2) parsing are similar with regard to sensitivity to syntactic and semantic error signals, but different with regard to processes of reanalysis.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Gunnar Jacob, Claudia FelserORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2014.984231
ISSN:1747-0218
ISSN:1747-0226
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=25397360
Parent Title (English):The quarterly journal of experimental psychology
Publisher:Nature Publ. Group
Place of publication:Abingdon
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2016
Year of Completion:2016
Release Date:2020/03/22
Tag:Garden-path recovery; Non-native language processing; Reanalysis; Semantic persistence
Volume:69
Pagenumber:19
First Page:907
Last Page:925
Funder:Alexander-von-Humboldt professorship
Peer Review:Referiert
Institution name at the time of publication:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Exzellenzbereich Kognitionswissenschaften