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Prevention of dyslexia short-term and intermediate effects of promoting phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence with at-risk preschool children

  • Objective: This study assesses the short-term and intermediate effects of preschool training stimulating phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence for children at risk of developing dyslexia. Moreover, we examined whether training reduced the frequency of subsequent dyslexic problems. Method: 25 children at risk of developing dyslexia were trained with Horen, Lauschen, Lernen 1 und 2 (Kuspert & Schneider, 2008; Plume & Schneider, 2004) by their kindergarten teachers and were compared with 60 untrained at-risk children. Results:The training revealed a significant short-term effect: The phonological awareness of trained at-risk children increased significantly over that of untrained at-risk children. However, there were no differences in phonological awareness, spelling, and reading ability between the first-graders in the training and control group. Furthermore, reading problems were reduced in the training group. Conclusions: In the future, phonological awareness as well as additional predictors should be included whenObjective: This study assesses the short-term and intermediate effects of preschool training stimulating phonological awareness and letter-sound correspondence for children at risk of developing dyslexia. Moreover, we examined whether training reduced the frequency of subsequent dyslexic problems. Method: 25 children at risk of developing dyslexia were trained with Horen, Lauschen, Lernen 1 und 2 (Kuspert & Schneider, 2008; Plume & Schneider, 2004) by their kindergarten teachers and were compared with 60 untrained at-risk children. Results:The training revealed a significant short-term effect: The phonological awareness of trained at-risk children increased significantly over that of untrained at-risk children. However, there were no differences in phonological awareness, spelling, and reading ability between the first-graders in the training and control group. Furthermore, reading problems were reduced in the training group. Conclusions: In the future, phonological awareness as well as additional predictors should be included when identifying children vulnerable to developing dyslexia. Moreover, in order to prevent dyslexia, additional prerequisite deficits need to be identified, alleviated, and their effects evaluated.show moreshow less

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Author:Anna Höse, Anne Wyschkon, Svenja Moraske, Marie Eggeling, Sabine Quandte, Juliane Kohn, Nadine Poltz, Michael von Aster, Günter Esser
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/1422-4917/a000456
ISSN:1422-4917
ISSN:1664-2880
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=27356674
Parent Title (German):Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie
Publisher:Hogrefe
Place of publication:Bern
Document Type:Article
Language:German
Year of first Publication:2016
Year of Completion:2016
Release Date:2020/03/22
Tag:developmental dyslexia; phonological awareness; prevention; risk; specific developmental disorder
Volume:44
Page Number:15
First Page:377
Last Page:391
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Psychologie
Peer Review:Referiert