Dynamics of mantle plumes

Dynamik von Mantelplumes

  • Mantle plumes are a link between different scales in the Earth’s mantle: They are an important part of large-scale mantle convection, transporting material and heat from the core-mantle boundary to the surface, but also affect processes on a smaller scale, such as melt generation and transport and surface magmatism. When they reach the base of the lithosphere, they cause massive magmatism associated with the generation of large igneous provinces, and they can be related to mass extinction events (Wignall, 2001) and continental breakup (White and McKenzie, 1989). Thus, mantle plumes have been the subject of many previous numerical modelling studies (e.g. Farnetani and Richards, 1995; d’Acremont et al., 2003; Lin and van Keken, 2005; Sobolev et al., 2011; Ballmer et al., 2013). However, complex mechanisms, such as the development and implications of chemical heterogeneities in plumes, their interaction with mid-ocean ridges and global mantle flow, and melt ascent from the source region to the surface are still not very well understood;Mantle plumes are a link between different scales in the Earth’s mantle: They are an important part of large-scale mantle convection, transporting material and heat from the core-mantle boundary to the surface, but also affect processes on a smaller scale, such as melt generation and transport and surface magmatism. When they reach the base of the lithosphere, they cause massive magmatism associated with the generation of large igneous provinces, and they can be related to mass extinction events (Wignall, 2001) and continental breakup (White and McKenzie, 1989). Thus, mantle plumes have been the subject of many previous numerical modelling studies (e.g. Farnetani and Richards, 1995; d’Acremont et al., 2003; Lin and van Keken, 2005; Sobolev et al., 2011; Ballmer et al., 2013). However, complex mechanisms, such as the development and implications of chemical heterogeneities in plumes, their interaction with mid-ocean ridges and global mantle flow, and melt ascent from the source region to the surface are still not very well understood; and disagreements between observations and the predictions of classical plume models have led to a challenge of the plume concept in general (Czamanske et al., 1998; Anderson, 2000; Foulger, 2011). Hence, there is a need for more sophisticated models that can explain the underlying physics, assess which properties and processes are important, explain how they cause the observations visible at the Earth’s surface and provide a link between the different scales. In this work, integrated plume models are developed that investigate the effect of dense recycled oceanic crust on the development of mantle plumes, plume–ridge interaction under the influence of global mantle flow and melting and melt migration in form of two-phase flow. The presented analysis of these models leads to a new, updated picture of mantle plumes: Models considering a realistic depth-dependent density of recycled oceanic crust and peridotitic mantle material show that plumes with excess temperatures of up to 300 K can transport up to 15% of recycled oceanic crust through the whole mantle. However, due to the high density of recycled crust, plumes can only advance to the base of the lithosphere directly if they have high excess temperatures, high plume volumes and the lowermost mantle is subadiabatic, or plumes rise from the top or edges of thermo-chemical piles. They might only cause minor surface uplift, and instead of the classical head–tail structure, these low-buoyancy plumes are predicted to be broad features in the lower mantle with much less pronounced plume heads. They can form a variety of shapes and regimes, including primary plumes directly advancing to the base of the lithosphere, stagnating plumes, secondary plumes rising from the core–mantle boundary or a pool of eclogitic material in the upper mantle and failing plumes. In the upper mantle, plumes are tilted and deflected by global mantle flow, and the shape, size and stability of the melting region is influenced by the distance from nearby plate boundaries, the speed of the overlying plate and the movement of the plume tail arriving from the lower mantle. Furthermore, the structure of the lithosphere controls where hot material is accumulated and melt is generated. In addition to melting in the plume tail at the plume arrival position, hot plume material flows upwards towards opening rifts, towards mid-ocean ridges and towards other regions of thinner lithosphere, where it produces additional melt due to decompression. This leads to the generation of either broad ridges of thickened magmatic crust or the separation into multiple thinner lines of sea mount chains at the surface. Once melt is generated within the plume, it influences its dynamics, lowering the viscosity and density, and while it rises the melt volume is increased up to 20% due to decompression. Melt has the tendency to accumulate at the top of the plume head, forming diapirs and initiating small-scale convection when the plume reaches the base of the lithosphere. Together with the introduced unstable, high-density material produced by freezing of melt, this provides an efficient mechanism to thin the lithosphere above plume heads. In summary, this thesis shows that mantle plumes are more complex than previously considered, and linking the scales and coupling the physics of different processes occurring in mantle plumes can provide insights into how mantle plumes are influenced by chemical heterogeneities, interact with the lithosphere and global mantle flow, and are affected by melting and melt migration. Including these complexities in geodynamic models shows that plumes can also have broad plume tails, might produce only negligible surface uplift, can generate one or several volcanic island chains in interaction with a mid–ocean ridge, and can magmatically thin the lithosphere.show moreshow less
  • Mantelplumes verbinden Prozesse auf verschiedenen Skalen im Erdmantel: Sie sind ein wichtiger Teil der globalen Mantelkonvektion, sie transportieren Material und Wärmeenergie von der Kern-Mantel-Grenze zur Erdoberfläche, aber beeinflussen auch kleinskaligere Prozesse wie Schmelzbildung und -transport und die damit verbundenen magmatischen Ereignisse. Wenn Plumes die Unterseite der Lithosphäre erreichen, entstehen große Mengen partiell geschmolzenen Gesteins, was zu großräumigen Vulkaneruptionen sowie der Entstehung von Plateaubasaltprovinzen führt, und auch mit Massenaussterbeereignissen und dem Auseinanderbrechen von Kontinenten in Zusammenhang stehen kann. Aufgrund dieser erdgeschichtlichen Bedeutung wurde bereits eine große Anzahl an Studien über Plumes durchgeführt (z.B. Farnetani und Richards, 1995; d’Acremont u. a., 2003; Lin und van Keken, 2005; Sobolev u. a., 2011; Ballmer u. a., 2013). Trotzdem ist unser Verständnis komplexerer Vorgänge und Interaktionen in Plumes noch nicht vollständig: Beispiele sind die Entwicklung von chMantelplumes verbinden Prozesse auf verschiedenen Skalen im Erdmantel: Sie sind ein wichtiger Teil der globalen Mantelkonvektion, sie transportieren Material und Wärmeenergie von der Kern-Mantel-Grenze zur Erdoberfläche, aber beeinflussen auch kleinskaligere Prozesse wie Schmelzbildung und -transport und die damit verbundenen magmatischen Ereignisse. Wenn Plumes die Unterseite der Lithosphäre erreichen, entstehen große Mengen partiell geschmolzenen Gesteins, was zu großräumigen Vulkaneruptionen sowie der Entstehung von Plateaubasaltprovinzen führt, und auch mit Massenaussterbeereignissen und dem Auseinanderbrechen von Kontinenten in Zusammenhang stehen kann. Aufgrund dieser erdgeschichtlichen Bedeutung wurde bereits eine große Anzahl an Studien über Plumes durchgeführt (z.B. Farnetani und Richards, 1995; d’Acremont u. a., 2003; Lin und van Keken, 2005; Sobolev u. a., 2011; Ballmer u. a., 2013). Trotzdem ist unser Verständnis komplexerer Vorgänge und Interaktionen in Plumes noch nicht vollständig: Beispiele sind die Entwicklung von chemisch heterogenen Plumes, der Einfluss dieses chemisch andersartigen Materials auf die Aufstiegsdynamik, die Wechselwirkung zwischen Plumes und mittelozeanischen Rücken sowie den globalen Konvektionsströmungen und das Aufsteigen von Schmelze von ihrer Entstehungsregion bis hin zur Erdoberfläche. Unterschiede zwischen Beobachtungen und den Aussagen klassischer Modelle werden als Argumente gegen das Plumekonzept insgesamt angeführt (Czamanske u. a., 1998; Anderson, 2000; Foulger, 2011). Daher gibt es weiterhin einen Bedarf für ausgereiftere Modelle, welche die Skalen verschiedener Prozesse verbinden, den Einfluss dieser Prozesse sowie der Material- und Strömungseigenschaften berücksichtigen und quantifizieren, ihre Auswirkungen an der Erdoberfläche erklären und diese mit Beobachtungen vergleichen. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurden Plume-Modelle erstellt, welche den Einfluss dichter, recycelter ozeanischer Kruste auf die Entwicklung van Mantelplumes, die Interaktion von Plumes und mittelozeanischen Rücken und den Einfluss globaler Mantelkonvektion sowie Aufschmelzung und Schmelzaufstieg in Form von Zweiphasenströmung (“two-phase flow”) untersuchen. Die vorgestellte Analyse dieser Modelle ergibt ein neues, aktualisiertes Konzept von Mantelplumes: Wenn ein realistischer Dichteunterschied zwischen recycelter ozeanischer Kruste und peridotitischem Mantel angenommen wird, kann ein Plume bis zu 15% recyceltes Material durch den gesamten Mantel transportieren. Durch die hohe Dichte der recycelten Kruste können Plumes aber nur bis zur Lithosphäre aufsteigen, wenn ihre Temperatur und ihr Volumen hoch genug sind, und wenn die Temperatur im unteren Mantel subadiabatisch ist oder die Plumes von aufgewölbten thermo-chemischen “Piles” aufsteigen. Es ist durchaus möglich, dass diese Plumes nur eine geringe Hebung der Oberfläche verursachen, und anstatt der klassischen pilzförmigen Kopf-Tail-Struktur bilden sie breite Strukturen im unteren Mantel mit weitaus weniger ausgeprägtem Plumekopf. Dafür können sie in verschiedenen Formen und Regimes auftreten: Primäre Plumes, welche direkt von der Kern-Mantel-Grenze zur Lithosphäre aufsteigen, stagnierende Plumes, sekundäre Plumes von der Kernmantelgrenze oder einer Ansammlung eklogitischen Materials im oberen Mantel und scheiternde Plumes, die die Lithosphäre nicht erreichen. Im oberen Mantel werden Plumes durch globale Konvektion abgelenkt und geneigt, und die Form, Größe und Stabilität der Schmelzregion wird durch den Abstand zu nahen Plattengrenzen, der Geschwindigkeit der sich darüber bewegenden Platte und der Bewegung des aus dem unteren Mantel ankommenden Plume-Tails bestimmt. Weiterhin beeinflusst auch die Struktur der Lithosphäre wo sich warmes Material sammeln kann und Schmelze entsteht. Zusätzlich zur Aufschmelzung beim Erreichen der Untergrenze der Lithosphäre strömt heißes Plumematerial auch lateral und weiter nach oben zu sich öffnenden Rifts, zu mittelozeanischen Rücken sowie zu anderen Regionen dünnerer Lithosphäre, wo durch die Druckentlastung weitere Schmelze generiert wird. Diese führt an der Erdoberfläche zur Entwicklung von entweder breiten Rücken verdickter magmatischer Kruste oder der Aufteilung in mehrere ozeanischen Inselketten. Sobald Schmelze generiert wurde, beeinflusst diese auch die Dynamik des Plumes, indem sie Viskosität und Dichte verringert. Während des Plumeaufstiegs kann sich das Schmelzvolumen dabei durch die Dekompression um bis zu 20% vergrößern. Schmelze hat die Tendenz sich an der Oberseite des Plumes anzusammeln, wo sie Diapire formt und kleinräumige Konvektion auslöst, wenn der Plume die Lithosphäre erreicht. Zusammen mit dem dichten, instabilen Material, das entsteht, wenn die Schmelze wieder erstarrt, bildet dies einen effektiven Mechanismus zur Erosion der Lithosphäre durch Plume-Heads. Zusammenfassend zeigt die vorliegende Arbeit, dass Mantelplumes komplexer sind als bisher angenommen, und dass die Verbindung von Skalen und die Kombination verschiedener in Mantelplumes auftretender physikalischer Prozesse Erkenntnisse liefern kann, wie Mantelplumes durch chemische Heterogenität beeinflusst werden, wie sie mit mittelozeanischen Rücken und globaler Mantelkonvektion interagieren und wie sie durch Aufschmelzung und Schmelzmigraiton beeinflusst werden. Die Einbindung dieser Prozesse in geodynamische Modelle zeigt, dass Plumes breite Tails haben können, potentiell nur geringe Oberflächenhebung verursachen, in Interaktion mit einem mittelozeanischen Rücken eine oder mehrere vulkanische Inselketten erzeugen können und magmatisch die Lithosphäre erodieren können.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

  • Export Bibtex
  • Export RIS
  • Export XML
Metadaten
Author:Juliane Dannberg
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-91024
Subtitle (English):linking scales and coupling physics
Subtitle (German):gekoppelte und skalenübergreifende Modelle
Advisor:Stephan Sobolev, Michael Weber, Volker John
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2016
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2016/04/27
Release Date:2016/06/06
Tag:Mantelplumes; numerische Modellierung
mantle plumes; numerical modelling
Pagenumber:162
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
MSC Classification:86-XX GEOPHYSICS [See also 76U05, 76V05] / 86-04 Explicit machine computation and programs (not the theory of computation or programming)
PACS Classification:90.00.00 GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS (for more detailed headings, see the Geophysics Appendix) / 91.00.00 Solid Earth physics / 91.35.-x Earth`s interior structure and properties / 91.35.Cb Models of interior structure
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht