Gellius, ein stoischer nebulo und das Zitat : zu Gell. 1,2

  • Chapter 1, 2 of the Noctes Atticae reports how the orator and politician Herodes Atticus silences a boastful young Stoic by citing a diatribe of Epictetus. The article shows that Gellius – unlike his own assertion – does not describe a real experience. Instead he dramatizes the text (Epict. diss. 2, 19), which is the origin of the citation. Comparing both texts one finds details of the scenery described, the characterizations of the protagonists as well as the themes discussed quite similar in both the non-cited parts of Epictetus and the text of Gellius. Particularly interesting in that respect is how Gellius takes up citing and its various aspects as it can be found in his model. Epictetus deals with this theme in a critical way, because in his opinion citations of authorities say nothing about the philosophical qualities of the person who uses them. While Gellius’ praxis of citation is formally modelled very closely on Epictetus’ speech, regarding the content he by no means rejects the use of philosophical citations as weapon to beChapter 1, 2 of the Noctes Atticae reports how the orator and politician Herodes Atticus silences a boastful young Stoic by citing a diatribe of Epictetus. The article shows that Gellius – unlike his own assertion – does not describe a real experience. Instead he dramatizes the text (Epict. diss. 2, 19), which is the origin of the citation. Comparing both texts one finds details of the scenery described, the characterizations of the protagonists as well as the themes discussed quite similar in both the non-cited parts of Epictetus and the text of Gellius. Particularly interesting in that respect is how Gellius takes up citing and its various aspects as it can be found in his model. Epictetus deals with this theme in a critical way, because in his opinion citations of authorities say nothing about the philosophical qualities of the person who uses them. While Gellius’ praxis of citation is formally modelled very closely on Epictetus’ speech, regarding the content he by no means rejects the use of philosophical citations as weapon to beat an opponent in discussion.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Ute Tischer
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus-42366
Series (Serial Number):Postprints der Universität Potsdam : Philosophische Reihe (59)
Document Type:Postprint
Language:German
Date of Publication (online):2010/05/06
Year of Completion:2007
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Release Date:2010/05/06
Tag:Epictetus; Gellius; Herodes Atticus; Noctes Atticae
Epictetus; Gellius; Herodes Atticus; Noctes Atticae
Source:Philologus 151 (2007) 2, S. 273-284, DOI 10.1524/phil.2007.0005
Organizational units:Philosophische Fakultät / Klassische Philologie
Dewey Decimal Classification:8 Literatur / 87 Lateinische, italische Literaturen / 870 Italische Literaturen; Lateinische Literatur
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht
Notes extern:
The original publication is within the university network available at www.atypon-link.com:
Philologus. - 151 (2007) Issue 2, p. 273-284
ISSN 1939-1285
DOI 10.1524/phil.2007.0005