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Effects of climbing on core strength and mobility in adults

  • The objective of this study was to examine the impact of an indoor climbing training and detraining program on core/handgrip strength and trunk mobility in men and women. 28 young sedentary adults participated in this study and were assigned to an intervention (30+/-3 years) or a control (29+/-2 years) group. The intervention group participated in 8 weeks (2 times/week) of indoor climbing training, followed by 8 weeks of detraining. Tests included the measurement of maximal isometric strength (MIS) of the trunk flexors/extensors, the assessment of trunk mobility in the sagittal (SAP) and the coronal (CRP) plane as well as testing of handgrip strength. After training, significant improvements were observed in MIS of the trunk flexors/extensors (similar to 19-22 %, all p<0.01), in trunk mobility in SAP/CRP (similar to 14-19 %, all p<0.01), and in handgrip strength (similar to 5 %, p<0.01). During detraining, MIS (similar to 12-13 %, all p<0.01) and trunk mobility (similar to 7-10%, all p<0.01) deteriorated significantly, whereasThe objective of this study was to examine the impact of an indoor climbing training and detraining program on core/handgrip strength and trunk mobility in men and women. 28 young sedentary adults participated in this study and were assigned to an intervention (30+/-3 years) or a control (29+/-2 years) group. The intervention group participated in 8 weeks (2 times/week) of indoor climbing training, followed by 8 weeks of detraining. Tests included the measurement of maximal isometric strength (MIS) of the trunk flexors/extensors, the assessment of trunk mobility in the sagittal (SAP) and the coronal (CRP) plane as well as testing of handgrip strength. After training, significant improvements were observed in MIS of the trunk flexors/extensors (similar to 19-22 %, all p<0.01), in trunk mobility in SAP/CRP (similar to 14-19 %, all p<0.01), and in handgrip strength (similar to 5 %, p<0.01). During detraining, MIS (similar to 12-13 %, all p<0.01) and trunk mobility (similar to 7-10%, all p<0.01) deteriorated significantly, whereas handgrip strength remained. This indoor climbing training program conducted in sedentary adults proved to be feasible (i.e., attendance rate of 89.4%) and effective. It is suggested that indoor climbing should be permanently conducted to maintain the observed improvements in core muscle strength and trunk mobility.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Thomas MuehlbauerORCiDGND, M. Stürchler, Urs GranacherORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0031-1301312
ISSN:0172-4622
Parent Title (English):International journal of sports medicine
Publisher:Thieme
Place of publication:Stuttgart
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2012
Year of Completion:2012
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:detraining; intervention; sedentary; young adults
Volume:33
Issue:6
Pagenumber:7
First Page:445
Last Page:451
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportwissenschaft
Peer Review:Referiert