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Structure of the oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle north of the Gloria Fault in the eastern mid-Atlantic by receiver function analysis

  • Receiver functions (RF) have been used for several decades to study structures beneath seismic stations. Although most available stations are deployed on shore, the number of ocean bottom station (OBS) experiments has increased in recent years. Almost all OBSs have to deal with higher noise levels and a limited deployment time (approximate to 1year), resulting in a small number of usable records of teleseismic earthquakes. Here we use OBSs deployed as midaperture array in the deep ocean (4.5-5.5km water depth) of the eastern mid-Atlantic. We use evaluation criteria for OBS data and beamforming to enhance the quality of the RFs. Although some stations show reverberations caused by sedimentary cover, we are able to identify the Moho signal, indicating a normal thickness (5-8km) of oceanic crust. Observations at single stations with thin sediments (300-400m) indicate that a probable sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) might exist at a depth of approximate to 70-80km which is in line with LAB depth estimates for similarReceiver functions (RF) have been used for several decades to study structures beneath seismic stations. Although most available stations are deployed on shore, the number of ocean bottom station (OBS) experiments has increased in recent years. Almost all OBSs have to deal with higher noise levels and a limited deployment time (approximate to 1year), resulting in a small number of usable records of teleseismic earthquakes. Here we use OBSs deployed as midaperture array in the deep ocean (4.5-5.5km water depth) of the eastern mid-Atlantic. We use evaluation criteria for OBS data and beamforming to enhance the quality of the RFs. Although some stations show reverberations caused by sedimentary cover, we are able to identify the Moho signal, indicating a normal thickness (5-8km) of oceanic crust. Observations at single stations with thin sediments (300-400m) indicate that a probable sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) might exist at a depth of approximate to 70-80km which is in line with LAB depth estimates for similar lithospheric ages in the Pacific. The mantle discontinuities at approximate to 410km and approximate to 660km are clearly identifiable. Their delay times are in agreement with PREM. Overall the usage of beam-formed earthquake recordings for OBS RF analysis is an excellent way to increase the signal quality and the number of usable events.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Katrin Hannemann, Frank Krüger, Torsten Dahm, Dietrich LangeORCiD
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JB013582
ISSN:2169-9313
ISSN:2169-9356
Parent Title (English):Journal of geophysical research : Solid earth
Publisher:American Geophysical Union
Place of publication:Washington
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2017
Year of Completion:2017
Release Date:2020/04/20
Tag:ocean bottom seismology; oceanic lithosphere and mantle; receiver function
Volume:122
Pagenumber:24
First Page:7927
Last Page:7950
Funder:DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft/German Research Foundation) [KR1935/13, DA478/21-1]; Leitstelle fur Mittelgrosse Forschungsschiffe (RV Poseidon cruises) [416, 431]
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Peer Review:Referiert