The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 7 of 28
Back to Result List

Measuring of clock drift rates and static time offsets of ocean bottom stations by means of ambient noise

  • Marine seismology usually relies on temporary deployments of stand alone seismic ocean bottom stations (OBS), which are initialized and synchronized on ship before deployment and re-synchronized and stopped on ship after recovery several months later. In between, the recorder clocks may drift and float at unknown rates. If the clock drifts are large or not linear and cannot be corrected for, seismological applications will be limited to methods not requiring precise common timing. Therefore, for example, array seismological methods, which need very accurate timing between individual stations, would not be applicable for such deployments. We use an OBS test-array of 12 stations and 75 km aperture, deployed for 10 months in the deep sea (4.5-5.5 km) of the mid-eastern Atlantic. The experiment was designed to analyse the potential of broad-band array seismology at the seafloor. After recovery, we identified some stations which either show unusual large clock drifts and/or static time offsets by having a large difference between theMarine seismology usually relies on temporary deployments of stand alone seismic ocean bottom stations (OBS), which are initialized and synchronized on ship before deployment and re-synchronized and stopped on ship after recovery several months later. In between, the recorder clocks may drift and float at unknown rates. If the clock drifts are large or not linear and cannot be corrected for, seismological applications will be limited to methods not requiring precise common timing. Therefore, for example, array seismological methods, which need very accurate timing between individual stations, would not be applicable for such deployments. We use an OBS test-array of 12 stations and 75 km aperture, deployed for 10 months in the deep sea (4.5-5.5 km) of the mid-eastern Atlantic. The experiment was designed to analyse the potential of broad-band array seismology at the seafloor. After recovery, we identified some stations which either show unusual large clock drifts and/or static time offsets by having a large difference between the internal clock and the GPS-signal (skew). We test the approach of ambient noise cross-correlation to synchronize clocks of a deep water OBS array with km-scale interstation distances. We show that small drift rates and static time offsets can be resolved on vertical components with a standard technique. Larger clock drifts (several seconds per day) can only be accurately recovered if time windows of one input trace are shifted according to the expected drift between a station pair before the cross-correlation. We validate that the drifts extracted from the seismometer data are linear to first order. The same is valid for most of the hydrophones. Moreover, we were able to determine the clock drift at a station where no skew could be measured. Furthermore, we find that instable apparent drift rates at some hydrophones, which are uncorrelated to the seismometer drift recorded at the same digitizer, indicate a malfunction of the hydrophone.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Katrin Hannemann, Frank Krüger, Torsten DahmORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/gji/ggt434
ISSN:0956-540X
ISSN:1365-246X
Parent Title (English):Geophysical journal international
Publisher:Oxford Univ. Press
Place of publication:Oxford
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2014
Year of Completion:2014
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Broad-band seismometers; Interferometry; Time-series analysis
Volume:196
Issue:2
Pagenumber:9
First Page:1034
Last Page:1042
Funder:DFG
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Peer Review:Referiert