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Small and inconsistent effects of whole body vibration on athletic performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis

  • We quantified the acute and chronic effects of whole body vibration on athletic performance or its proxy measures in competitive and/or elite athletes. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Whole body vibration combined with exercise had an overall 0.3 % acute effect on maximal voluntary leg force (-6.4 %, effect size = -0.43, 1 study), leg power (4.7 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.30, 6 studies), flexibility (4.6 %, effect size = -0.12 to 0.22, 2 studies), and athletic performance (-1.9 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.26, 6 studies) in 191 (103 male, 88 female) athletes representing eight sports (overall effect size = 0.28). Whole body vibration combined with exercise had an overall 10.2 % chronic effect on maximal voluntary leg force (14.6 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.44, 5 studies), leg power (10.7 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.42, 9 studies), flexibility (16.5 %, effect size = 0.57 to 0.61, 2 studies), and athletic performance (-1.2 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.45, 5 studies) in 437 (169 male, 268 female)We quantified the acute and chronic effects of whole body vibration on athletic performance or its proxy measures in competitive and/or elite athletes. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Whole body vibration combined with exercise had an overall 0.3 % acute effect on maximal voluntary leg force (-6.4 %, effect size = -0.43, 1 study), leg power (4.7 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.30, 6 studies), flexibility (4.6 %, effect size = -0.12 to 0.22, 2 studies), and athletic performance (-1.9 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.26, 6 studies) in 191 (103 male, 88 female) athletes representing eight sports (overall effect size = 0.28). Whole body vibration combined with exercise had an overall 10.2 % chronic effect on maximal voluntary leg force (14.6 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.44, 5 studies), leg power (10.7 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.42, 9 studies), flexibility (16.5 %, effect size = 0.57 to 0.61, 2 studies), and athletic performance (-1.2 %, weighted mean effect size = 0.45, 5 studies) in 437 (169 male, 268 female) athletes (overall effect size = 0.44). Whole body vibration has small and inconsistent acute and chronic effects on athletic performance in competitive and/or elite athletes. These findings lead to the hypothesis that neuromuscular adaptive processes following whole body vibration are not specific enough to enhance athletic performance. Thus, other types of exercise programs (e.g., resistance training) are recommended if the goal is to improve athletic performance.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Tibor Hortobagyi, Melanie LesinskiORCiDGND, Miguel Fernandez-del-Olmo, Urs GranacherORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3194-9
ISSN:1439-6319 (print)
ISSN:1439-6327 (online)
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=26037127
Parent Title (English):European journal of applied physiology
Publisher:Springer
Place of publication:New York
Document Type:Review
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2015
Year of Completion:2015
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Endocrine; Exercise; Force; Metabolism; Muscle; Power; Reflex; Skill
Volume:115
Issue:8
Pagenumber:21
First Page:1605
Last Page:1625
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Strukturbereich Kognitionswissenschaften
Peer Review:Referiert
Institution name at the time of publication:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Exzellenzbereich Kognitionswissenschaften