• search hit 1 of 1
Back to Result List

Offspring sex determines the impact of the maternal ACE I/D polymorphism on maternal glycaemic control during the last weeks of pregnancy

  • Hypothesis/Introduction: We recently demonstrated that fetal sex may affect maternal glycaemic control in genetically prone mothers. We tested the hypothesis that fetal sex/fetal Y/X chromosomes might affect maternal glycaemic control during pregnancy depending on the maternal angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism. Material and methods: One thousand, three hundred and thirty-two Caucasian women without pre-existing diabetes and pre-existing hypertension with singleton pregnancies delivering consecutively at the Charite obstetrics department were genotyped. Glycaemic control was analysed by measuring total glycated haemoglobin at birth. Correction for confounding factors and multiple testing was done. Results: Maternal ACE I/D polymorphism showed significant interaction with fetal sex concerning maternal total glycated haemoglobin. Total glycated haemoglobin in DD mothers delivering boys was 6.42 +/- 0.70% vs. 6.21 +/- 0.66% in DD mother delivering girls (p < 0.005), whereas the II carrying mothers showed the oppositeHypothesis/Introduction: We recently demonstrated that fetal sex may affect maternal glycaemic control in genetically prone mothers. We tested the hypothesis that fetal sex/fetal Y/X chromosomes might affect maternal glycaemic control during pregnancy depending on the maternal angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism. Material and methods: One thousand, three hundred and thirty-two Caucasian women without pre-existing diabetes and pre-existing hypertension with singleton pregnancies delivering consecutively at the Charite obstetrics department were genotyped. Glycaemic control was analysed by measuring total glycated haemoglobin at birth. Correction for confounding factors and multiple testing was done. Results: Maternal ACE I/D polymorphism showed significant interaction with fetal sex concerning maternal total glycated haemoglobin. Total glycated haemoglobin in DD mothers delivering boys was 6.42 +/- 0.70% vs. 6.21 +/- 0.66% in DD mother delivering girls (p < 0.005), whereas the II carrying mothers showed the opposite effect. II mothers delivering a girl had a higher (p = 0.044) total glycated haemoglobin at birth (6.40 +/- 0.80%) compared to II mothers delivering boys (6.21 +/- 0.81%). There was no interaction of the ACE I/D polymorphism and fetal sex with respect to new onset proteinuria, new onset edema and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Conclusions: Maternal glycaemic control during the last weeks of pregnancy seems to be influenced by an interaction of the ACE I/D genotyp and fetal sex.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Berthold HocherORCiDGND, Ludwig Schlemm, Hannah Haumann, Jian Li, Jan Rahnenführer, Florian Guthmann, Christian Bamberg, Philipp Kalk, Thiemo Pfab, You-Peng Chen
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1470320310387843
ISSN:1470-3203 (print)
Parent Title (English):Journal of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system
Publisher:Sage Publ.
Place of publication:London
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2011
Year of Completion:2011
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:ACE I/D polymorphism; fetal sex; glycemic control during pregnancy; pregnancy; pregnancy induced diabetes; total glycated hemoglobin
Volume:12
Issue:3
Pagenumber:8
First Page:254
Last Page:261
Funder:Fresenius Foundation
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Ernährungswissenschaft
Peer Review:Referiert