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Influence of Load on Three-Dimensional Segmental Trunk Kinematics in One-Handed Lifting: A Pilot Study

  • Stability of the trunk is relevant in determining trunk response to different loading in everyday tasks initiated by the limbs. Descriptions of the trunk’s mechanical movement patterns in response to different loads while lifting objects are still under debate. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of weight on 3-dimensional segmental motion of the trunk during 1-handed lifting. Ten asymptomatic subjects were included (29 ± 3 y; 1.79 ± 0.09 m; 75 ± 14 kg). Subjects lifted 3× a light and heavy load from the ground up onto a table. Three-dimensional segmental trunk motion was measured (12 markers; 3 segments: upper thoracic area [UTA], lower thoracic area [LTA], lumbar area [LA]). Outcomes were total motion amplitudes (ROM;[°]) for anterior flexion, lateral flexion, and rotation of each segment. The highest ROM was observed in the LTA segment (anterior flexion), and the smallest ROM in the UTA segment (lateral flexion). ROM differed for all planes between the 3 segments for both tasks (P < .001). There were noStability of the trunk is relevant in determining trunk response to different loading in everyday tasks initiated by the limbs. Descriptions of the trunk’s mechanical movement patterns in response to different loads while lifting objects are still under debate. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of weight on 3-dimensional segmental motion of the trunk during 1-handed lifting. Ten asymptomatic subjects were included (29 ± 3 y; 1.79 ± 0.09 m; 75 ± 14 kg). Subjects lifted 3× a light and heavy load from the ground up onto a table. Three-dimensional segmental trunk motion was measured (12 markers; 3 segments: upper thoracic area [UTA], lower thoracic area [LTA], lumbar area [LA]). Outcomes were total motion amplitudes (ROM;[°]) for anterior flexion, lateral flexion, and rotation of each segment. The highest ROM was observed in the LTA segment (anterior flexion), and the smallest ROM in the UTA segment (lateral flexion). ROM differed for all planes between the 3 segments for both tasks (P < .001). There were no differences in ROM between light and heavy loads (P > .05). No interaction effects (load × segment) were observed, as ROM did not reveal differences between loading tasks. Regardless of weight, the 3 segments did reflect differences, supporting the relevance of multisegmental analysis.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Juliane Müller, Steffen Müller, Josefine Stoll, Michael Rector, Heiner BaurORCiDGND, Frank MayerORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1123/jab.2015-0227
ISSN:1065-8483
ISSN:1543-2688
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=27341406
Parent Title (English):Journal of applied biomechanics
Publisher:Human Kinetics Publ.
Place of publication:Champaign
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2016
Year of Completion:2016
Release Date:2020/03/22
Tag:MiSpEx*; everyday task; kinematic trunk model; trunk motion
Volume:32
Pagenumber:6
First Page:520
Last Page:525
Funder:German Federal Institute of Sport Science; MiSpEx-the National Research Network for Medicine in Spine Exercise [BISp IIA1-080102A/11-14]; European Union (ERDF-European Regional Development Fund) [80132471]
Peer Review:Referiert
Institution name at the time of publication:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Exzellenzbereich Kognitionswissenschaften