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Birthweight and Fetal Glycosylated Hemoglobin at Birth in Newborns Carrying the GLUT1 XbaI Gene Polymorphism

  • Background: Low birthweight is an independent risk factor of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes in later life. Genetically determined insulin resistance and subsequently impaired glucose uptake might explain both reduced fetal growth and elevated blood glucose. The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT!) plays an important role for fetal glucose uptake as well as for maternal-fetal glucose transfer, and it has been associated with insulin resistance in adults. The present study hypothesized that the common fetal GLUT1 XbaI polymorphism might reduce fetal insulin sensitivity and/or glucose supply in utero, thus affecting fetal blood glucose and fetal growth. Methods: A genetic association study was conducted at the obstetrics department of the Charite University Hospital, Berlin, Germany. 119.1 white women were included after delivery, and all newborns were genotyped for the GLUT1 XbaI polymorphism. Total glycosylated hemoglobin was quantified, serving as a surrogate of glycemia during the last weeks of pregnancy. Results: The analysis ofBackground: Low birthweight is an independent risk factor of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes in later life. Genetically determined insulin resistance and subsequently impaired glucose uptake might explain both reduced fetal growth and elevated blood glucose. The glucose transporter 1 (GLUT!) plays an important role for fetal glucose uptake as well as for maternal-fetal glucose transfer, and it has been associated with insulin resistance in adults. The present study hypothesized that the common fetal GLUT1 XbaI polymorphism might reduce fetal insulin sensitivity and/or glucose supply in utero, thus affecting fetal blood glucose and fetal growth. Methods: A genetic association study was conducted at the obstetrics department of the Charite University Hospital, Berlin, Germany. 119.1 white women were included after delivery, and all newborns were genotyped for the GLUT1 XbaI polymorphism. Total glycosylated hemoglobin was quantified, serving as a surrogate of glycemia during the last weeks of pregnancy. Results: The analysis of this large population showed no significant differences in fetal glycosylated hemoglobin or birthweight for the different fetal GLUT1 XbaI genotypes. Only newborns carrying the mutated allele show the previously published inverse association between birthweight and glycosylated hemoglobin. Conclusions: The results suggest that there is no prenatal effect of the fetal GLUT1 XbaI polymorphism on fetal insulin sensitivity, intrauterine fetal glucose supply or fetal growth. However, the polymorphism seems to modulate the inverse interaction between birthweight and fetal glycemia.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Berthold HocherGND, Dirk Heimerl, Torsten Slowinski, Michael Godes, Horst Halle, Friedrich Priem, Thiemo Pfab
ISSN:1433-6510 (print)
Parent Title (English):Clinical laboratory : the peer reviewed journal for clinical laboratories and laboratories related to blood transfusion
Publisher:Clin Lab Publ., Verl. Klinisches Labor
Place of publication:Heidelberg
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2011
Year of Completion:2011
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:GLUT1 XbaI gene polymorphism; birthweight; fetal programming; insulin resistance; total glycosylated hemoglobin
Volume:57
Issue:9-10
Pagenumber:7
First Page:651
Last Page:657
Funder:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) [Ho1665/5-2]; Else Kroner-Fresenius-Foundation
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Ernährungswissenschaft
Peer Review:Referiert