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David d’Beth Hillel and Jacob Sapir

  • Two 19th century rabbis born in Vilna and educated in its raditionalist rationalism interacted with India’s temple Hinduism in different ways. Both were fascinated with Hindu worship and images, but David d’Beth Hillel entered temples and disputed with priests, while Jacob Sapir observed from outside, composing written pictures of Hindu images using a biblical vocabulary of abomination. D’Beth Hillel employed Hebrew linguistics to uncover secret meanings of Hindu words. However, both travelers interpreted Hindu religiosity similarly, as idolatrous worship. They explained this Hinduism historically as a survival of Judean idolatry brought to India by Jewish migrants, or as a survival from an ancient culture of idolatry that once filled the world. Both rabbis also perceived Jewish elements in Hinduism, which they explained from Jewish migrations of the past. The similarities in their conceptualizations of Hinduism point to a common Jewish worldview that constructed the world as opposing realms of revelation and idolatry, and also toTwo 19th century rabbis born in Vilna and educated in its raditionalist rationalism interacted with India’s temple Hinduism in different ways. Both were fascinated with Hindu worship and images, but David d’Beth Hillel entered temples and disputed with priests, while Jacob Sapir observed from outside, composing written pictures of Hindu images using a biblical vocabulary of abomination. D’Beth Hillel employed Hebrew linguistics to uncover secret meanings of Hindu words. However, both travelers interpreted Hindu religiosity similarly, as idolatrous worship. They explained this Hinduism historically as a survival of Judean idolatry brought to India by Jewish migrants, or as a survival from an ancient culture of idolatry that once filled the world. Both rabbis also perceived Jewish elements in Hinduism, which they explained from Jewish migrations of the past. The similarities in their conceptualizations of Hinduism point to a common Jewish worldview that constructed the world as opposing realms of revelation and idolatry, and also to common theories about how cultural change occurs through survivals, corruptions, and diffusion.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Richard G. Marks
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-408884
ISBN:978-3-86956-418-0
ISSN:1614-6492 (print)
ISSN:1862-7684 (online)
Parent Title (English):PaRDeS : Journal of the Association of Jewish Studies [23 (2017)] = JewBus, Jewish Hindus & other Jewish Encounters with East Asian Religions
Parent Title (German):PaRDeS : Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien [23 (2017)] = JewBus, Jewish Hindus & other Jewish Encounters with East Asian Religions
Subtitle (English):Their Encounters with Temple Hinduism in 19th Century India
Publisher:Universitätsverlag Potsdam
Place of publication:Potsdam
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2018/03/16
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Publishing Institution:Universitätsverlag Potsdam
Release Date:2018/03/23
Issue:23
First Page:19
Last Page:39
Source:PaRDeS : Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien [23 (2017)] | ISBN 978-3-86956-418-0 | S. 19-39
RVK - Regensburg Classification:BD 1680
Organizational units:Extern / Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien e. V.
Dewey Decimal Classification:2 Religion / 20 Religion / 200 Religion
Peer Review:Referiert
Publication Way:Open Access
Universitätsverlag Potsdam
Collections:Universität Potsdam / Zeitschriften / PaRDeS : Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien e.V., ISSN 1862-7684 / PaRDeS (2017) 23 / Articles
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht