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Genetic control of plant organ growth

  • The growth of plant organs is under genetic control. Work in model species has identified a considerable number of genes that regulate different aspects of organ growth. This has led to an increasingly detailed knowledge about how the basic cellular processes underlying organ growth are controlled, and which factors determine when proliferation gives way to expansion, with this transition emerging as a critical decision point during primordium growth. Progress has been made in elucidating the genetic basis of allometric growth and the role of tissue polarity in shaping organs. We are also beginning to understand how the mechanisms that determine organ identity influence local growth behaviour to generate organs with characteristic sizes and shapes. Lastly, growth needs to be coordinated at several levels, for example between different cell layers and different regions within one organ, and the genetic basis for such coordination is being elucidated. However, despite these impressive advances, a number of basic questions are still notThe growth of plant organs is under genetic control. Work in model species has identified a considerable number of genes that regulate different aspects of organ growth. This has led to an increasingly detailed knowledge about how the basic cellular processes underlying organ growth are controlled, and which factors determine when proliferation gives way to expansion, with this transition emerging as a critical decision point during primordium growth. Progress has been made in elucidating the genetic basis of allometric growth and the role of tissue polarity in shaping organs. We are also beginning to understand how the mechanisms that determine organ identity influence local growth behaviour to generate organs with characteristic sizes and shapes. Lastly, growth needs to be coordinated at several levels, for example between different cell layers and different regions within one organ, and the genetic basis for such coordination is being elucidated. However, despite these impressive advances, a number of basic questions are still not fully answered, for example, whether and how a growing primordium keeps track of its size. Answering these questions will likely depend on including additional approaches that are gaining in power and popularity, such as combined live imaging and modelling.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Kim L. JohnsonORCiDGND, Michael Lenhard
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2011.03737.x
ISSN:0028-646X (print)
Parent Title (English):New phytologist : international journal of plant science
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication:Malden
Document Type:Review
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2011
Year of Completion:2011
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:growth coordination; organ growth; organ identity; organ shape; organ size
Volume:191
Issue:2
Pagenumber:15
First Page:319
Last Page:333
Funder:Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council [BB/G001421/1]; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft [DFG Le1412/3-1]
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert