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Contemporary tectonic stress pattern of the Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

  • The present-day stress state is a key parameter in numerous geoscientific research fields including geodynamics, seismic hazard assessment, and geomechanics of georeservoirs. The Taranaki Basin of New Zealand is located on the Australian Plate and forms the western boundary of tectonic deformation due to Pacific Plate subduction along the Hikurangi margin. This paper presents the first comprehensive wellbore-derived basin-scale in situ stress analysis in New Zealand. We analyze borehole image and oriented caliper data from 129 petroleum wells in the Taranaki Basin to interpret the shape of boreholes and determine the orientation of maximum horizontal stress (S-Hmax). We combine these data (151 S-Hmax data records) with 40 stress data records derived from individual earthquake focal mechanism solutions, 6 from stress inversions of focal mechanisms, and 1 data record using the average of several focal mechanism solutions. The resulting data set has 198 data records for the Taranaki Basin and suggests a regional S-Hmax orientation ofThe present-day stress state is a key parameter in numerous geoscientific research fields including geodynamics, seismic hazard assessment, and geomechanics of georeservoirs. The Taranaki Basin of New Zealand is located on the Australian Plate and forms the western boundary of tectonic deformation due to Pacific Plate subduction along the Hikurangi margin. This paper presents the first comprehensive wellbore-derived basin-scale in situ stress analysis in New Zealand. We analyze borehole image and oriented caliper data from 129 petroleum wells in the Taranaki Basin to interpret the shape of boreholes and determine the orientation of maximum horizontal stress (S-Hmax). We combine these data (151 S-Hmax data records) with 40 stress data records derived from individual earthquake focal mechanism solutions, 6 from stress inversions of focal mechanisms, and 1 data record using the average of several focal mechanism solutions. The resulting data set has 198 data records for the Taranaki Basin and suggests a regional S-Hmax orientation of N068 degrees E (22 degrees), which is in agreement with NW-SE extension suggested by geological data. Furthermore, this ENE-WSW average S-Hmax orientation is subparallel to the subduction trench and strike of the subducting slab (N50 degrees E) beneath the central western North Island. Hence, we suggest that the slab geometry and the associated forces due to slab rollback are the key control of crustal stress in the Taranaki Basin. In addition, we find stress perturbations with depth in the vicinity of faults in some of the studied wells, which highlight the impact of local stress sources on the present-day stress rotation.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Mojtaba Rajabi, Moritz Ziegler, Mark Tingay, Oliver Heidbach, Scott Reynolds
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JB013178
ISSN:2169-9313
ISSN:2169-9356
Parent Title (English):Journal of geophysical research : Solid earth
Publisher:American Geophysical Union
Place of publication:Washington
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2016
Year of Completion:2016
Release Date:2020/03/22
Tag:New Zealand; Taranaki Basin; in situ stress; plate tectonics; subduction zone
Volume:121
Pagenumber:18
First Page:6053
Last Page:6070
Funder:ARC [DP120103849]; ASEG Research Foundation [RF13P02]
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Peer Review:Referiert