• search hit 10 of 223
Back to Result List

Trophic niche differentiation and microhabitat utilization revealed by stable isotope analyses in a dry-forest bat assemblage at Ankarana, northern Madagascar

  • Bats are important components in tropical mammal assemblages. Unravelling the mechanisms allowing multiple syntopic bat species to coexist can provide insights into community ecology. However, dietary information on component species of these assemblages is often difficult to obtain. Here we measuredstable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in hair samples clipped from the backs of 94 specimens to indirectly examine whether trophic niche differentiation and microhabitat segregation explain the coexistence of 16 bat species at Ankarana, northern Madagascar. The assemblage ranged over 4.4% in delta N-15 and was structured into two trophic levels with phytophagous Pteropodidae as primary consumers (c. 3% enriched over plants) and different insectivorous bats as secondary consumers (c. 4% enriched over primary consumers). Bat species utilizing different microhabitats formed distinct isotopic clusters (metric analyses of delta C-13-delta N-15 bi-plots), but taxa foraging in the same microhabitat did not show more pronounced trophicBats are important components in tropical mammal assemblages. Unravelling the mechanisms allowing multiple syntopic bat species to coexist can provide insights into community ecology. However, dietary information on component species of these assemblages is often difficult to obtain. Here we measuredstable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in hair samples clipped from the backs of 94 specimens to indirectly examine whether trophic niche differentiation and microhabitat segregation explain the coexistence of 16 bat species at Ankarana, northern Madagascar. The assemblage ranged over 4.4% in delta N-15 and was structured into two trophic levels with phytophagous Pteropodidae as primary consumers (c. 3% enriched over plants) and different insectivorous bats as secondary consumers (c. 4% enriched over primary consumers). Bat species utilizing different microhabitats formed distinct isotopic clusters (metric analyses of delta C-13-delta N-15 bi-plots), but taxa foraging in the same microhabitat did not show more pronounced trophic differentiation than those occupying different microhabitats. As revealed by multivariate analyses, no discernible feeding competition was found in the local assemblage amongst congeneric species as compared with non-congeners. In contrast to ecological niche theory, but in accordance with studies on New and Old World bat assemblages, competitive interactions appear to be relaxed at Ankarana and not a prevailing structuring force.show moreshow less

Download full text files

  • SHA-1:130f97e23dc3316d4e1884712c15f35e4c2918c0

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Melanie Dammhahn, Steven M. Goodman
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-415157
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-41515
ISSN:1866-8372
Parent Title (English):Postprints der Universität Potsdam : Mathematisch Naturwissenschaftliche Reihe
Series (Serial Number):Postprints der Universität Potsdam : Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Reihe (595)
Document Type:Postprint
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2019/02/12
Year of Completion:2014
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Release Date:2019/02/12
Tag:Ankarana; Chiroptera; Madagascar; canopy effect; coexistence; community structure; congeneric species; dry deciduous forest
Pagenumber:13
First Page:97
Last Page:109
Source:Journal of Tropical Ecology 63 (2014) 2, pp.97–109 DOI 10.1017/S0266467413000825
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert
Publication Way:Open Access
Grantor:Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht