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Calcium phosphate mineralization with linear poly(ethylene imine) a time-resolved study

  • We have earlier shown that linear poly(ethylene imine) (LPEI) is an efficient growth modifier for calcium phosphate mineralization from aqueous solution (Shkilnyy et al., Langmuir, 2008, 24 (5), 2102). The current study addresses the growth process and the reason why LPEI is such an effective additive. To that end, the solution pH and the calcium and phosphate concentrations were monitored vs. reaction time using potentiometric, complexometric, and photometric methods. The phase transformations in the precipitates and particle morphogenesis were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. All measurements reveal steep decreases of the pH, calcium, and phosphate concentrations along with a rapid precipitation of brushite nanoparticles early on in the reaction. Brushite transforms into hydroxyapatite (HAP) within the first 2 h, which is much faster than what is reported, for example, for calcium phosphate precipitated with poly(acrylic acid). We propose that poly(ethylene imine) acts as a protonWe have earlier shown that linear poly(ethylene imine) (LPEI) is an efficient growth modifier for calcium phosphate mineralization from aqueous solution (Shkilnyy et al., Langmuir, 2008, 24 (5), 2102). The current study addresses the growth process and the reason why LPEI is such an effective additive. To that end, the solution pH and the calcium and phosphate concentrations were monitored vs. reaction time using potentiometric, complexometric, and photometric methods. The phase transformations in the precipitates and particle morphogenesis were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. All measurements reveal steep decreases of the pH, calcium, and phosphate concentrations along with a rapid precipitation of brushite nanoparticles early on in the reaction. Brushite transforms into hydroxyapatite (HAP) within the first 2 h, which is much faster than what is reported, for example, for calcium phosphate precipitated with poly(acrylic acid). We propose that poly(ethylene imine) acts as a proton acceptor (weak buffer), which accelerates the transformation from brushite to HAP by taking up the protons that are released from the calcium phosphate precipitate during the phase transformation.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Andriy Shkilnyy, Stefanie Schöne, Claudia Rumplasch, Annett Uhlmann, Annett Hedderich, Christina Günter, Andreas TaubertORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00396-011-2403-2
ISSN:0303-402X (print)
Parent Title (English):Colloid and polymer science : official journal of the Kolloid-Gesellschaft
Publisher:Springer
Place of publication:New York
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2011
Year of Completion:2011
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:Calcium phosphate; Kinetics; Mineralization; Polyethylene imine
Volume:289
Issue:8
Pagenumber:8
First Page:881
Last Page:888
Funder:MPI of Colloids and Interfaces; MPI of Colloids and Interfaces (Colloid Chemistry Department); Fonds der Chemischen Industrie; University of Potsdam
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Chemie
Peer Review:Referiert