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The role of alcohol and victim sexual interest in Spanish students' perceptions of sexual assault

  • Two studies investigated the effects of information related to rape myths on Spanish college students’ perceptions of sexual assault. In Study 1, 92 participants read a vignette about a nonconsensual sexual encounter and rated whether it was a sexual assault and how much the woman was to blame. In the scenario, the man either used physical force or offered alcohol to the woman to overcome her resistance. Rape myth acceptance (RMA) was measured as an individual difference variable. Participants were more convinced that the incident was a sexual assault and blamed the woman less when the man had used force rather than offering her alcohol. In Study 2, 164 college students read a scenario in which the woman rejected a man’s sexual advances after having either accepted or turned down his offer of alcohol. In addition, the woman was either portrayed as being sexually attracted to him or there was no mention of her sexual interest. Participants’ RMA was again included. High RMA participants blamed the victim more than low RMA participantsTwo studies investigated the effects of information related to rape myths on Spanish college students’ perceptions of sexual assault. In Study 1, 92 participants read a vignette about a nonconsensual sexual encounter and rated whether it was a sexual assault and how much the woman was to blame. In the scenario, the man either used physical force or offered alcohol to the woman to overcome her resistance. Rape myth acceptance (RMA) was measured as an individual difference variable. Participants were more convinced that the incident was a sexual assault and blamed the woman less when the man had used force rather than offering her alcohol. In Study 2, 164 college students read a scenario in which the woman rejected a man’s sexual advances after having either accepted or turned down his offer of alcohol. In addition, the woman was either portrayed as being sexually attracted to him or there was no mention of her sexual interest. Participants’ RMA was again included. High RMA participants blamed the victim more than low RMA participants and were less certain that the incident was a sexual assault, especially when the victim had accepted alcohol and was described as being sexually attracted to the man. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the prevention and legal prosecution of sexual assault.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Mónica Romero-Sánchez, Jesús L Megías, Barbara KrahéORCiDGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-403230
Series (Serial Number):Postprints der Universität Potsdam : Humanwissenschaftliche Reihe (371)
Document Type:Postprint
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2017/12/14
Year of Completion:2017
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Release Date:2017/12/14
Tag:alcohol; rape myth acceptance; sexual assault; token resistance; victim blame
Pagenumber:29
Source:Journal of Interpersonal Violence 27 (2012) Nr. 11, S. 2230– 2258. - DOI: 10.1177/0886260511432149
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Strukturbereich Kognitionswissenschaften / Department Psychologie
Dewey Decimal Classification:3 Sozialwissenschaften / 34 Recht / 340 Recht
Peer Review:Referiert
Publication Way:Open Access
Grantor:Sage
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht