• search hit 3 of 7
Back to Result List

Evolutionary fingerprints in genome-scale networks

Evolutionäre Spuren in genomskaligen Netzwerken

  • Mathematical modeling of biological phenomena has experienced increasing interest since new high-throughput technologies give access to growing amounts of molecular data. These modeling approaches are especially able to test hypotheses which are not yet experimentally accessible or guide an experimental setup. One particular attempt investigates the evolutionary dynamics responsible for today's composition of organisms. Computer simulations either propose an evolutionary mechanism and thus reproduce a recent finding or rebuild an evolutionary process in order to learn about its mechanism. The quest for evolutionary fingerprints in metabolic and gene-coexpression networks is the central topic of this cumulative thesis based on four published articles. An understanding of the actual origin of life will probably remain an insoluble problem. However, one can argue that after a first simple metabolism has evolved, the further evolution of metabolism occurred in parallel with the evolution of the sequences of the catalyzing enzymes.Mathematical modeling of biological phenomena has experienced increasing interest since new high-throughput technologies give access to growing amounts of molecular data. These modeling approaches are especially able to test hypotheses which are not yet experimentally accessible or guide an experimental setup. One particular attempt investigates the evolutionary dynamics responsible for today's composition of organisms. Computer simulations either propose an evolutionary mechanism and thus reproduce a recent finding or rebuild an evolutionary process in order to learn about its mechanism. The quest for evolutionary fingerprints in metabolic and gene-coexpression networks is the central topic of this cumulative thesis based on four published articles. An understanding of the actual origin of life will probably remain an insoluble problem. However, one can argue that after a first simple metabolism has evolved, the further evolution of metabolism occurred in parallel with the evolution of the sequences of the catalyzing enzymes. Indications of such a coevolution can be found when correlating the change in sequence between two enzymes with their distance on the metabolic network which is obtained from the KEGG database. We observe that there exists a small but significant correlation primarily on nearest neighbors. This indicates that enzymes catalyzing subsequent reactions tend to be descended from the same precursor. Since this correlation is relatively small one can at least assume that, if new enzymes are no "genetic children" of the previous enzymes, they certainly be descended from any of the already existing ones. Following this hypothesis, we introduce a model of enzyme-pathway coevolution. By iteratively adding enzymes, this model explores the metabolic network in a manner similar to diffusion. With implementation of an Gillespie-like algorithm we are able to introduce a tunable parameter that controls the weight of sequence similarity when choosing a new enzyme. Furthermore, this method also defines a time difference between successive evolutionary innovations in terms of a new enzyme. Overall, these simulations generate putative time-courses of the evolutionary walk on the metabolic network. By a time-series analysis, we find that the acquisition of new enzymes appears in bursts which are pronounced when the influence of the sequence similarity is higher. This behavior strongly resembles punctuated equilibrium which denotes the observation that new species tend to appear in bursts as well rather than in a gradual manner. Thus, our model helps to establish a better understanding of punctuated equilibrium giving a potential description at molecular level. From the time-courses we also extract a tentative order of new enzymes, metabolites, and even organisms. The consistence of this order with previous findings provides evidence for the validity of our approach. While the sequence of a gene is actually subject to mutations, its expression profile might also indirectly change through the evolutionary events in the cellular interplay. Gene coexpression data is simply accessible by microarray experiments and commonly illustrated using coexpression networks where genes are nodes and get linked once they show a significant coexpression. Since the large number of genes makes an illustration of the entire coexpression network difficult, clustering helps to show the network on a metalevel. Various clustering techniques already exist. However, we introduce a novel one which maintains control of the cluster sizes and thus assures proper visual inspection. An application of the method on Arabidopsis thaliana reveals that genes causing a severe phenotype often show a functional uniqueness in their network vicinity. This leads to 20 genes of so far unknown phenotype which are however suggested to be essential for plant growth. Of these, six indeed provoke such a severe phenotype, shown by mutant analysis. By an inspection of the degree distribution of the A.thaliana coexpression network, we identified two characteristics. The distribution deviates from the frequently observed power-law by a sharp truncation which follows after an over-representation of highly connected nodes. For a better understanding, we developed an evolutionary model which mimics the growth of a coexpression network by gene duplication which underlies a strong selection criterion, and slight mutational changes in the expression profile. Despite the simplicity of our assumption, we can reproduce the observed properties in A.thaliana as well as in E.coli and S.cerevisiae. The over-representation of high-degree nodes could be identified with mutually well connected genes of similar functional families: zinc fingers (PF00096), flagella, and ribosomes respectively. In conclusion, these four manuscripts demonstrate the usefulness of mathematical models and statistical tools as a source of new biological insight. While the clustering approach of gene coexpression data leads to the phenotypic characterization of so far unknown genes and thus supports genome annotation, our model approaches offer explanations for observed properties of the coexpression network and furthermore substantiate punctuated equilibrium as an evolutionary process by a deeper understanding of an underlying molecular mechanism.show moreshow less
  • Die biologische Zelle ist ein sehr kompliziertes Gebilde. Bei ihrer Betrachtung gilt es, das Zusammenspiel von Tausenden bis Millionen von Genen, Regulatoren, Proteinen oder Molekülen zu beschreiben und zu verstehen. Durch enorme Verbesserungen experimenteller Messgeräte gelingt es mittlerweile allerdings in geringer Zeit enorme Datenmengen zu messen, seien dies z.B. die Entschlüsselung eines Genoms oder die Konzentrationen der Moleküle in einer Zelle. Die Systembiologie nimmt sich dem Problem an, aus diesem Datenmeer ein quantitatives Verständnis für die Gesamtheit der Wechselwirkungen in der Zelle zu entwickeln. Dabei stellt die mathematische Modellierung und computergestützte Analyse ein eminent wichtiges Werkzeug dar, lassen sich doch am Computer in kurzer Zeit eine Vielzahl von Fällen testen und daraus Hypothesen generieren, die experimentell verifiziert werden können. Diese Doktorarbeit beschäftigt sich damit, wie durch mathematische Modellierung Rückschlüsse auf die Evolution und deren Mechanismen geschlossen werden können.Die biologische Zelle ist ein sehr kompliziertes Gebilde. Bei ihrer Betrachtung gilt es, das Zusammenspiel von Tausenden bis Millionen von Genen, Regulatoren, Proteinen oder Molekülen zu beschreiben und zu verstehen. Durch enorme Verbesserungen experimenteller Messgeräte gelingt es mittlerweile allerdings in geringer Zeit enorme Datenmengen zu messen, seien dies z.B. die Entschlüsselung eines Genoms oder die Konzentrationen der Moleküle in einer Zelle. Die Systembiologie nimmt sich dem Problem an, aus diesem Datenmeer ein quantitatives Verständnis für die Gesamtheit der Wechselwirkungen in der Zelle zu entwickeln. Dabei stellt die mathematische Modellierung und computergestützte Analyse ein eminent wichtiges Werkzeug dar, lassen sich doch am Computer in kurzer Zeit eine Vielzahl von Fällen testen und daraus Hypothesen generieren, die experimentell verifiziert werden können. Diese Doktorarbeit beschäftigt sich damit, wie durch mathematische Modellierung Rückschlüsse auf die Evolution und deren Mechanismen geschlossen werden können. Dabei besteht die Arbeit aus zwei Teilen. Zum Einen wurde ein Modell entwickelt, dass die Evolution des Stoffwechsels nachbaut. Der zweite Teil beschäftigt sich mit der Analyse von Genexpressionsdaten, d.h. der Stärke mit der ein bestimmtes Gen in ein Protein umgewandelt, "exprimiert", wird. Der Stoffwechsel bezeichnet die Gesamtheit der chemischen Vorgänge in einem Organismus; zum Einen werden Nahrungsstoffe für den Organismus verwertbar zerlegt, zum Anderen aber auch neue Stoffe aufgebaut. Da für nahezu jede chemische Reaktion ein katalysierendes Enzym benötigt wird, ist davon auszugehen, dass sich der Stoffwechsel parallel zu den Enzymen entwickelt hat. Auf dieser Annahme basiert das entwickelte Modell zur Enzyme-Stoffwechsel-Koevolution. Von einer Anfangsmenge von Enzymen und Molekülen ausgehend, die etwa in einer primitiven Atmosphäre vorgekommen sind, werden sukzessive Enzyme und die nun katalysierbaren Reaktionen hinzugefügt, wodurch die Stoffwechselkapazität anwächst. Die Auswahl eines neuen Enzyms geschieht dabei in Abhängigkeit von der Ähnlichkeit mit bereits vorhandenen und ist so an den evolutionären Vorgang der Mutation angelehnt: je ähnlicher ein neues Enzym zu den vorhandenen ist, desto schneller kann es hinzugefügt werden. Dieser Vorgang wird wiederholt, bis der Stoffwechsel die heutige Form angenommen hat. Interessant ist vor allem der zeitliche Verlauf dieser Evolution, der mittels einer Zeitreihenanalyse untersucht wird. Dabei zeigt sich, dass neue Enzyme gebündelt in Gruppen kurzer Zeitfolge auftreten, gefolgt von Intervallen relativer Stille. Dasselbe Phänomen kennt man von der Evolution neuer Arten, die ebenfalls gebündelt auftreten, und wird Punktualismus genannt. Diese Arbeit liefert somit ein besseres Verständnis dieses Phänomens durch eine Beschreibung auf molekularer Ebene. Im zweiten Projekt werden Genexpressionsdaten von Pflanzen analysiert. Einerseits geschieht dies mit einem eigens entwickelten Cluster-Algorithmus. Hier läßt sich beobachten, dass Gene mit einer ähnlichen Funktion oft auch ein ähnliches Expressionsmuster aufweisen. Das Clustering liefert einige Genkandidaten, deren Funktion bisher unbekannt war, von denen aber nun vermutet werden konnte, dass sie enorm wichtig für das Wachstum der Pflanze sind. Durch Experimente von Pflanzen mit und ohne diese Gene zeigte sich, dass sechs neuen Genen dieses essentielle Erscheinungsbild zugeordnet werden kann. Weiterhin wurden Netzwerke der Genexpressionsdaten einer Pflanze, eines Pilzes und eines Bakteriums untersucht. In diesen Netzwerken werden zwei Gene verbunden, falls sie ein sehr ähnliches Expressionsprofil aufweisen. Nun zeigten diese Netzwerke sehr ähnliche und charakteristische Eigenschaften auf. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurde daher ein weiteres evolutionäres Modell entwickelt, das die Expressionsprofile anhand von Duplikation, Mutation und Selektion beschreibt. Obwohl das Modell auf sehr simplen Eigenschaften beruht, spiegelt es die beobachteten Eigenschaften sehr gut wider, und es läßt sich der Schluss ziehen, dass diese als Resultat der Evolution betrachtet werden können. Die Ergebnisse dieser Arbeiten sind als Doktorarbeit in kumulativer Form bestehend aus vier veröffentlichten Artikeln vereinigt.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Moritz Schütte
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus-57483
Advisor:Joachim Selbig
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2011
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2011/12/20
Release Date:2012/01/18
Tag:Evolution; Gen-Koexpression; Modellierung; Stoffwechsel; Systembiologie
Evolution; Gene co-expression; Metabolism; Modeling; Systems Biology
RVK - Regensburg Classification:WH 2500
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Extern / Extern
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht