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Interface-controlled calcium phosphate mineralization: effect of oligo(aspartic acid)-rich interfaces

  • The phase behavior of an amphiphilic block copolymer based on a poly(aspartic acid) hydrophilic block and a poly(n-butyl acrylate) hydrophobic block was investigated at the air-water and air-buffer interface. The polymer forms stable monomolecular films on both subphases. At low pH, the isotherms exhibit a plateau. Compression-expansion experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy suggest that the plateau is likely due to the formation of polymer bi- or multilayers. At high pH the films remain intact upon compression and no multilayer formation is observed. Furthermore, the mineralization of calcium phosphate beneath the monolayer was studied at different pH. The pH of the subphase and thus the polymer charge strongly affects the phase behavior of the film and the mineral formation. After 4 h of mineralization at low pH, atomic force microscopy shows smooth mineral films with a low roughness. With increasing pH the mineral films become inhomogeneous and the roughness increases. Transmission electron microscopy confirmsThe phase behavior of an amphiphilic block copolymer based on a poly(aspartic acid) hydrophilic block and a poly(n-butyl acrylate) hydrophobic block was investigated at the air-water and air-buffer interface. The polymer forms stable monomolecular films on both subphases. At low pH, the isotherms exhibit a plateau. Compression-expansion experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy suggest that the plateau is likely due to the formation of polymer bi- or multilayers. At high pH the films remain intact upon compression and no multilayer formation is observed. Furthermore, the mineralization of calcium phosphate beneath the monolayer was studied at different pH. The pH of the subphase and thus the polymer charge strongly affects the phase behavior of the film and the mineral formation. After 4 h of mineralization at low pH, atomic force microscopy shows smooth mineral films with a low roughness. With increasing pH the mineral films become inhomogeneous and the roughness increases. Transmission electron microscopy confirms this: at low pH a few small but uniform particles form whereas particles grown at higher pH are larger and highly agglomerated. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the formation of calcium phosphate. The levels of mineralization are higher in samples grown at high pH.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Doreen HentrichORCiDGND, Mathias Junginger, Michael Bruns, Hans G. Boerner, Jessica Brandt, Gerald BrezesinskiORCiD, Andreas TaubertORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1039/c4ce02274b
ISSN:1466-8033 (print)
Parent Title (English):CrystEngComm
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication:Cambridge
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2015
Year of Completion:2015
Release Date:2017/03/27
Volume:17
Issue:36
Pagenumber:13
First Page:6901
Last Page:6913
Funder:University of Potsdam; Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Chemie
Peer Review:Referiert