The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 15 of 829
Back to Result List

Trait-based understanding of plant species distributions along environmental gradients

Zum Verständnis der Verbreitung von Pflanzen entlang von umweltgradienten auf der Basis von funktionellen Eigenschaften

  • For more than two centuries, plant ecologists have aimed to understand how environmental gradients and biotic interactions shape the distribution and co-occurrence of plant species. In recent years, functional trait–based approaches have been increasingly used to predict patterns of species co-occurrence and species distributions along environmental gradients (trait–environment relationships). Functional traits are measurable properties at the individual level that correlate well with important processes. Thus, they allow us to identify general patterns by synthesizing studies across specific taxonomic compositions, thereby fostering our understanding of the underlying processes of species assembly. However, the importance of specific processes have been shown to be highly dependent on the spatial scale under consideration. In particular, it remains uncertain which mechanisms drive species assembly and allow for plant species coexistence at smaller, more local spatial scales. Furthermore, there is still no consensus on how particularFor more than two centuries, plant ecologists have aimed to understand how environmental gradients and biotic interactions shape the distribution and co-occurrence of plant species. In recent years, functional trait–based approaches have been increasingly used to predict patterns of species co-occurrence and species distributions along environmental gradients (trait–environment relationships). Functional traits are measurable properties at the individual level that correlate well with important processes. Thus, they allow us to identify general patterns by synthesizing studies across specific taxonomic compositions, thereby fostering our understanding of the underlying processes of species assembly. However, the importance of specific processes have been shown to be highly dependent on the spatial scale under consideration. In particular, it remains uncertain which mechanisms drive species assembly and allow for plant species coexistence at smaller, more local spatial scales. Furthermore, there is still no consensus on how particular environmental gradients affect the trait composition of plant communities. For example, increasing drought because of climate change is predicted to be a main threat to plant diversity, although it remains unclear which traits of species respond to increasing aridity. Similarly, there is conflicting evidence of how soil fertilization affects the traits related to establishment ability (e.g., seed mass). In this cumulative dissertation, I present three empirical trait-based studies that investigate specific research questions in order to improve our understanding of species distributions along environmental gradients. In the first case study, I analyze how annual species assemble at the local scale and how environmental heterogeneity affects different facets of biodiversity—i.e. taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity—at different spatial scales. The study was conducted in a semi-arid environment at the transition zone between desert and Mediterranean ecosystems that features a sharp precipitation gradient (Israel). Different null model analyses revealed strong support for environmentally driven species assembly at the local scale, since species with similar traits tended to co-occur and shared high abundances within microsites (trait convergence). A phylogenetic approach, which assumes that closely related species are functionally more similar to each other than distantly related ones, partly supported these results. However, I observed that species abundances within microsites were, surprisingly, more evenly distributed across the phylogenetic tree than expected (phylogenetic overdispersion). Furthermore, I showed that environmental heterogeneity has a positive effect on diversity, which was higher on functional than on taxonomic diversity and increased with spatial scale. The results of this case study indicate that environmental heterogeneity may act as a stabilizing factor to maintain species diversity at local scales, since it influenced species distribution according to their traits and positively influenced diversity. All results were constant along the precipitation gradient. In the second case study (same study system as case study one), I explore the trait responses of two Mediterranean annuals (Geropogon hybridus and Crupina crupinastrum) along a precipitation gradient that is comparable to the maximum changes in precipitation predicted to occur by the end of this century (i.e., −30%). The heterocarpic G. hybridus showed strong trends in seed traits, suggesting that dispersal ability increased with aridity. By contrast, the homocarpic C. crupinastrum showed only a decrease in plant height as aridity increased, while leaf traits of both species showed no consistent pattern along the precipitation gradient. Furthermore, variance decomposition of traits revealed that most of the trait variation observed in the study system was actually found within populations. I conclude that trait responses towards aridity are highly species-specific and that the amount of precipitation is not the most striking environmental factor at this particular scale. In the third case study, I assess how soil fertilization mediates—directly by increased nutrient addition and indirectly by increased competition—the effect of seed mass on establishment ability. For this experiment, I used 22 species differing in seed mass from dry grasslands in northeastern Germany and analyzed the interacting effects of seed mass with nutrient availability and competition on four key components of seedling establishment: seedling emergence, time of seedling emergence, seedling survival, and seedling growth. (Time of) seedling emergence was not affected by seed mass. However, I observed that the positive effect of seed mass on seedling survival is lowered under conditions of high nutrient availability, whereas the positive effect of seed mass on seedling growth was only reduced by competition. Based on these findings, I developed a conceptual model of how seed mass should change along a soil fertility gradient in order to reconcile conflicting findings from the literature. In this model, seed mass shows a U-shaped pattern along the soil fertility gradient as a result of changing nutrient availability and competition. Overall, the three case studies highlight the role of environmental factors on species distribution and co-occurrence. Moreover, the findings of this thesis indicate that spatial heterogeneity at local scales may act as a stabilizing factor that allows species with different traits to coexist. In the concluding discussion, I critically debate intraspecific trait variability in plant community ecology, the use of phylogenetic relationships and easily measured key functional traits as a proxy for species’ niches. Finally, I offer my outlook for the future of functional plant community research.show moreshow less
  • Seit über 200 Jahre erforschen Ökologen den Einfluss von Umweltgradienten, biotischen Interaktionen und neutralen Prozessen auf die Artenzusammensetzung von Pflanzengemeinschaften. Um generelle Muster und die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen unabhängig von der gegeben Artenzusammensetzung besser zu verstehen, wurden in den letzten Jahren vermehrt funktionellen Eigenschaften (‚functional traits‘) als methodischen Ansatz genutzt. Es wurde deutlich, dass die bestimmenden Prozesse abhängig von der betrachteten räumlichen Skala sind. Vor allem ist unklar, in wieweit Umweltheterogenität auf kleiner, lokaler Skala die Artenzusammensetzung beeinflusst. Des Weiteren ist Skalenabhängigkeit wichtig um den Einfluss von spezifischen Umweltgradienten, wie Trockenheit oder Bodenfertilität, auf die funktionelle Eigenschaften von Pflanzengemeinschaften zu ermitteln. In der vorliegenden Dissertation untersuche ich in drei unabhängigen, empirischen Studien den Einfluss von Umweltgradienten bzw. Umweltheterogenität auf die funktionellen Eigenschaften vonSeit über 200 Jahre erforschen Ökologen den Einfluss von Umweltgradienten, biotischen Interaktionen und neutralen Prozessen auf die Artenzusammensetzung von Pflanzengemeinschaften. Um generelle Muster und die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen unabhängig von der gegeben Artenzusammensetzung besser zu verstehen, wurden in den letzten Jahren vermehrt funktionellen Eigenschaften (‚functional traits‘) als methodischen Ansatz genutzt. Es wurde deutlich, dass die bestimmenden Prozesse abhängig von der betrachteten räumlichen Skala sind. Vor allem ist unklar, in wieweit Umweltheterogenität auf kleiner, lokaler Skala die Artenzusammensetzung beeinflusst. Des Weiteren ist Skalenabhängigkeit wichtig um den Einfluss von spezifischen Umweltgradienten, wie Trockenheit oder Bodenfertilität, auf die funktionelle Eigenschaften von Pflanzengemeinschaften zu ermitteln. In der vorliegenden Dissertation untersuche ich in drei unabhängigen, empirischen Studien den Einfluss von Umweltgradienten bzw. Umweltheterogenität auf die funktionellen Eigenschaften von Pflanzengemeinschaften unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Skalenabhängigkeit. In der ersten Fallstudie prüfe ich welche Faktoren die Artenzusammensetzung in einem semi-ariden Ökosystem (Israel), das von einjährigen Pflanzen dominiert wird, auf lokaler Skala bestimmen. Ich kann zeigen, dass vor allem Arten mit ähnlichen funktionellen Eigenschaften in Mikrohabitaten auftreten, das auf eine Selektion durch Umweltfaktoren hindeutet. Des Weiteren kann ich zeigen, dass mit Zunahme der Umweltheterogenität des Habitats die Diversität der funktionellen Eigenschaften sowie die Artendiversität in den Pflanzengemeinschaften zunehmen. Aus diesen Ergebnissen folgere ich, dass lokale Umweltheterogenität ein wichtiger Faktor für die Koexistenz der Pflanzenarten ist. Im selben Untersuchungsgebiet, untersuche ich in der zweiten Studie die Anpassung von mediterranen Pflanzen entlang eines Niederschlagsgradienten, der den vorausgesagten Niederschlagsveränderungen bis zum Ende dieses Jahrhunderts entspricht. Dafür wurden die funktionellen Eigenschaften von zwei typischen mediterranen Arten in 16 Populationen gemessen. Überraschenderweise zeigten die Arten unterschiedliche Anpassungen entlang des Gradienten, dass auf eine artspezifische Anpassung an Trockenheit hinweist. Des Weiteren wird in der Studie deutlich, dass der Regengradient zwar ein wichtiger, aber kein bestimmender Faktor auf der entsprechenden Skala ist, da ein großer Anteil der intraspezifischen Merkmalsvariation innerhalb der Populationen gefunden wird. In der dritten Studie untersuche ich inwieweit Bodenfertilität die Etablierungswahrscheinlichkeit von Pflanzen mit unterschiedlichen Samenmassen direkt (durch erhöhte Nährstoffverfügbarkeit) und indirekt (durch erhöhte Konkurrenz) beeinflusst. Das Experiment wurde mit 22 Trockenrasenarten aus Nordost Brandenburg durchgeführt. Es zeigte sich, dass der positive Effekt von Samenmasse auf die Etablierungsfähigkeit abhängig von den jeweiligen Bedingungen ist und verschiedene Prozesse während der Etablierungsphase beeinflusst werden. Auf der Basis dieser Ergebnisse und Literatur, stelle ich ein konzeptionelles Model vor, dass widersprüchliche Ergebnisse aus der Literatur synthetisiert. Zusammengenommen zeigen die Ergebnisse meiner Dissertation, dass funktionelle Eigenschaften wichtige Erkenntnisse über die Prozesse liefern, die das Auftreten von Pflanzen und deren Anpassung entlang von Umweltgradienten bestimmen. In der abschließenden Diskussion hinterfrage ich kritisch die Verwendung von intraspezifischer Variabilität funktioneller Eigenschaften in der Gemeinschaftsökologie, Phylogenie als Surrogat für die Nische einer Art und die Standardisierung funktioneller Eigenschaften als methodische Aspekte. Abschließend gebe ich einen Ausblick über zukünftige Pflanzenökologie-Forschung mit funktionellen Eigenschaften.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Kolja Bergholz
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-426341
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-42634
Referee:Jana PetermannORCiDGND, Anja LinstädterORCiDGND
Advisor:Florian Jeltsch
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2019/02/26
Release Date:2019/04/30
Tag:Biodiversität; Koexistenz von Arten; Pflanzengemeinschaften; funktionelle Ökologie
biodiversity; functional ecology; plant community; species coexistence
Pagenumber:128
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht