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Vegetation change and homogenization of species composition in temperate nutrient deficient scots pine forests after 45 yr

  • QuestionDoes eutrophication drive vegetation change in pine forests on nutrient deficient sites and thus lead to the homogenization of understorey species composition? LocationForest area (1600ha) in the Lower Spreewald, Brandenburg, Germany. MethodsResurvey of 77 semi-permanent plots after 45yr, including vascular plants, bryophytes and ground lichens. We applied multidimensional ordination of species composition, dissimilarity indices, mean Ellenberg indicator values and the concept of winner/loser species to identify vegetation change between years. Differential responses along a gradient of nutrient availability were analysed on the basis of initial vegetation type, reflecting topsoil N availability of plots. ResultsSpecies composition changed strongly and overall shifted towards higher N and slightly lower light availability. Differences in vegetation change were related to initial vegetation type, with strongest compositional changes in the oligotrophic forest type, but strongest increase of nitrophilous species in theQuestionDoes eutrophication drive vegetation change in pine forests on nutrient deficient sites and thus lead to the homogenization of understorey species composition? LocationForest area (1600ha) in the Lower Spreewald, Brandenburg, Germany. MethodsResurvey of 77 semi-permanent plots after 45yr, including vascular plants, bryophytes and ground lichens. We applied multidimensional ordination of species composition, dissimilarity indices, mean Ellenberg indicator values and the concept of winner/loser species to identify vegetation change between years. Differential responses along a gradient of nutrient availability were analysed on the basis of initial vegetation type, reflecting topsoil N availability of plots. ResultsSpecies composition changed strongly and overall shifted towards higher N and slightly lower light availability. Differences in vegetation change were related to initial vegetation type, with strongest compositional changes in the oligotrophic forest type, but strongest increase of nitrophilous species in the mesotrophic forest type. Despite an overall increase in species number, species composition was homogenized between study years due to the loss of species (mainly ground lichens) on the most oligotrophic sites. ConclusionsThe response to N enrichment is confounded by canopy closure on the N-richest sites and probably by water limitation on N-poorest sites. The relative importance of atmospheric N deposition in the eutrophication effect is difficult to disentangle from natural humus accumulation after historical litter raking. However, the profound differences in species composition between study years across all forest types suggest that atmospheric N deposition contributes to the eutrophication, which drives understorey vegetation change and biotic homogenization in Central European Scots pine forests on nutrient deficient sites.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Jennifer Reinecke, Gunther Klemm, Thilo Heinken
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12069
ISSN:1100-9233 (print)
ISSN:1654-1103 (online)
Parent Title (English):Journal of vegetation science
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication:Hoboken
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2014
Year of Completion:2014
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Canopy closure; Cryptogams; Eutrophication; Litter raking; Species diversity
Volume:25
Issue:1
Pagenumber:9
First Page:113
Last Page:121
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert