• search hit 1 of 4
Back to Result List

Human substrate metabolism at upper oxidative capacities

Substrat-Metabolismus bei oberen oxidativen Kapazitäten

  • Introduction: Carbohydrate (CHO) and fat are the main substrates to fuel prolonged endurance exercise, each having its oxidation patterns regulated by several factors such as intensity, duration and mode of the activity, dietary intake pattern, muscle glycogen concentrations, gender and training status. Exercising at intensities where fat oxidation rates are high has been shown to induce metabolic benefits in recreational and health-oriented sportsmen. The exercise intensity (Fatpeak) eliciting peak fat oxidation rates is therefore of particular interest when aiming to prescribe exercise for the purpose of fat oxidation and related metabolic effects. Although running and walking are feasible and popular among the target population, no reliable protocols are available to assess Fatpeak as well as its actual velocity (VPFO) during treadmill ergometry. Moreover, to date, it remains unclear how pre-exercise CHO availability modulates the oxidative regulation of substrates when exercise is conducted at the intensity where the individualIntroduction: Carbohydrate (CHO) and fat are the main substrates to fuel prolonged endurance exercise, each having its oxidation patterns regulated by several factors such as intensity, duration and mode of the activity, dietary intake pattern, muscle glycogen concentrations, gender and training status. Exercising at intensities where fat oxidation rates are high has been shown to induce metabolic benefits in recreational and health-oriented sportsmen. The exercise intensity (Fatpeak) eliciting peak fat oxidation rates is therefore of particular interest when aiming to prescribe exercise for the purpose of fat oxidation and related metabolic effects. Although running and walking are feasible and popular among the target population, no reliable protocols are available to assess Fatpeak as well as its actual velocity (VPFO) during treadmill ergometry. Moreover, to date, it remains unclear how pre-exercise CHO availability modulates the oxidative regulation of substrates when exercise is conducted at the intensity where the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT) is located (VIAT). That is, a metabolic marker representing the upper border where constant load endurance exercise can be sustained, being commonly used to guide athletic training or in performance diagnostics. The research objectives of the current thesis were therefore, 1) to assess the reliability and day-to-day variability of VPFO and Fatpeak during treadmill ergometry running; 2) to assess the impact of high CHO (HC) vs. low CHO (LC) diets (where on the LC day a combination of low CHO diet and a glycogen depleting exercise was implemented) on the oxidative regulation of CHOs and fat while exercise is conducted at VIAT. Methods: Research objective 1: Sixteen recreational athletes (f=7, m=9; 25 ± 3 y; 1.76 ± 0.09 m; 68.3 ± 13.7 kg; 23.1 ± 2.9 kg/m²) performed 2 different running protocols on 3 different days with standardized nutrition the day before testing. At day 1, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and the velocities at the aerobic threshold (VLT) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) of 1.00 (VRER) were assessed. At days 2 and 3, subjects ran an identical submaximal incremental test (Fat-peak test) composed of a 10 min warm-up (70% VLT) followed by 5 stages of 6 min with equal increments (stage 1 = VLT, stage 5 = VRER). Breath-by-breath gas exchange data was measured continuously and used to determine fat oxidation rates. A third order polynomial function was used to identify VPFO and subsequently Fatpeak. The reproducibility and variability of variables was verified with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Pearson’s correlation coefficient, coefficient of variation (CV) and the mean differences (bias) ± 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Research objective 2: Sixteen recreational runners (m=8, f=8; 28 ± 3 y; 1.76 ± 0.09 m; 72 ± 13 kg; 23 ± 2 kg/m²) performed 3 different running protocols, each allocated on a different day. At day 1, a maximal stepwise incremental test was implemented to assess the IAT and VIAT. During days 2 and 3, participants ran a constant-pace bout (30 min) at VIAT that was combined with randomly assigned HC (7g/kg/d) or LC (3g/kg/d) diets for the 24 h before testing. Breath-by-breath gas exchange data was measured continuously and used to determine substrate oxidation. Dietary data and differences in substrate oxidation were analyzed with a paired t-test. A two-way ANOVA tested the diet X gender interaction (α = 0.05). Results: Research objective 1: ICC, Pearson’s correlation and CV for VPFO and Fatpeak were 0.98, 0.97, 5.0%; and 0.90, 0.81, 7.0%, respectively. Bias ± 95% LoA was -0.3 ± 0.9 km/h for VPFO and -2 ± 8% of VO2peak for Fatpeak. Research objective 2: Overall, the IAT and VIAT were 2.74 ± 0.39 mmol/l and 11.1 ± 1.4 km/h, respectively. CHO oxidation was 3.45 ± 0.08 and 2.90 ± 0.07 g/min during HC and LC bouts respectively (P < 0.05). Likewise, fat oxidation was 0.13 ± 0.03 and 0.36 ± 0.03 g/min (P < 0.05). Females had 14% (P < 0.05) and 12% (P > 0.05) greater fat oxidation compared to males during HC and LC bouts, respectively. Conclusions: Research objective 1: In summary, relative and absolute reliability indicators for VPFO and Fatpeak were found to be excellent. The observed LoA may now serve as a basis for future training prescriptions, although fat oxidation rates at prolonged exercise bouts at this intensity still need to be investigated. Research objective 2: Twenty-four hours of high CHO consumption results in concurrent higher CHO oxidation rates and overall utilization, whereas maintaining a low systemic CHO availability significantly increases the contribution of fat to the overall energy metabolism. The observed gender differences underline the necessity of individualized dietary planning before exerting at intensities associated with performance exercise. Ultimately, future research should establish how these findings can be extrapolated to training and competitive situations and with that provide trainers and nutritionists with improved data to derive training prescriptions.show moreshow less
  • Einleitung: Kohlenhydrate (CHO) und Fett sind die bedeutendsten Energieträger bei anhaltender Ausdauerbelastung. Diese Substrate haben individuelle Oxidationsmuster, die von Intensität, Dauer und Art der Aktivität, sowie Nahrungszufuhr, Muskelglykogen-konzentration, Geschlecht und Trainingsstatus abhängen. Es ist bekannt, dass körperliche Aktivität unter hohen Fettverbrennungsraten, vorteilhafte metabolische Effekte bei freizeitaktiven und gesundheitsorientierten Sportlern hervorrufen. Die durch Belastungsintensität (Fatpeak) hervorgerufene höchste Fettoxidationsrate ist daher von besonderer Bedeutung für Empfehlungen von Fettverbrennungsaktivitäten und hierzu gehörigen metabolischen Effekten. Obgleich Joggen und Laufen als praktikabel und verbreitet in entsprechenden Zielgruppen angesehen wird, existieren keine reliablen Protokolle um Fatpeak und die hierzu spezifische Geschwindigkeit (VPFO) bei einer Laufbandergometrie zu bestimmen. Darüberhinaus, ist bis heute ungeklärt, inwiefern die Verfügbarkeit von CHO vor körperlicherEinleitung: Kohlenhydrate (CHO) und Fett sind die bedeutendsten Energieträger bei anhaltender Ausdauerbelastung. Diese Substrate haben individuelle Oxidationsmuster, die von Intensität, Dauer und Art der Aktivität, sowie Nahrungszufuhr, Muskelglykogen-konzentration, Geschlecht und Trainingsstatus abhängen. Es ist bekannt, dass körperliche Aktivität unter hohen Fettverbrennungsraten, vorteilhafte metabolische Effekte bei freizeitaktiven und gesundheitsorientierten Sportlern hervorrufen. Die durch Belastungsintensität (Fatpeak) hervorgerufene höchste Fettoxidationsrate ist daher von besonderer Bedeutung für Empfehlungen von Fettverbrennungsaktivitäten und hierzu gehörigen metabolischen Effekten. Obgleich Joggen und Laufen als praktikabel und verbreitet in entsprechenden Zielgruppen angesehen wird, existieren keine reliablen Protokolle um Fatpeak und die hierzu spezifische Geschwindigkeit (VPFO) bei einer Laufbandergometrie zu bestimmen. Darüberhinaus, ist bis heute ungeklärt, inwiefern die Verfügbarkeit von CHO vor körperlicher Belastung, die oxidative Regulation von Substraten beeinflusst, wenn die Belastungsintensität bei der individuelle anaeroben Schwelle (IAT) durchgeführt wird (VIAT). Die IAT beschreibt hierbei einen metabolischen Schwellenwert, bis zu welchem eine konstante Ausdauerleistung aufrecht erhalten werden kann. Dieser Schwellenwert wird üblicherweise zur Trainingssteuerung oder Leistungsdiagnostik herangezogen. Die Forschungsziele der hier vorgelegten Thesis sind daher: 1) Die Überprüfung der Reliabilität und Variabilität von VPFO und Fatpeak während einer Laufbandergometrie; 2) Die Überprüfung des Einflusses von kohlenhydratreicher (HC) im Vergleich zu kohlenhydratarmer (LC) Nahrungszufuhr auf die Regulierung der Oxidation von Kohlenhydraten und Fetten während körperlicher Aktivität bei VIAT. Hierbei wurde am LC Tag eine Kombination von geringer CHO Zufuhr und einer Glykogen verarmenden Belastung implementiert. Methoden: Forschungsziel 1: Sechszehn Freizeitsportler (f=7, m=9; 25 ± 3 y; 1.76 ± 0.09 m; 68.3 ± 13.7 kg; 23.1 ± 2.9 kg/m²) durchliefen 2 verschiedene Laufprotokolle an drei verschiedenen Tagen unter standardisierter Nahrungszufuhr vor den Untersuchungen. Am Tag 1 wurden die höchste Sauerstoffaufnahme (VO2peak) und die Geschwindigkeiten bei der aeroben Schwelle (VLT), sowie beim respiratorische Quotient (RER) von 1.00 (VRER) erfasst. Am Tag 2 und 3 absolvierten die Probanden einen identischen submaximalen Stufentest (Fat-peak test), welcher aus einer 10 min Erwärmungsphase (70% VLT) gefolgt von 5 gleichmäßig ansteigenden Stufen à 6 min (Stufe 1 = VLT, Stufe 5 = VRER) bestand. Atemgasdaten wurden durch „Breath-by-breath“-Analyse kontinuierlich gemessen und herangezogen um Fettoxidationsraten zu bestimmen. Aus diesen Daten wurde über eine Polynomfunktion dritter Ordnung VPFO und folglich Fatpeak identifiziert. Die Reproduzierbarkeit und Variabilität dieser Parameter wurde mittels des Intraklassen-Korrelationskoeffizient (ICC), des Pearson’s Korrelationskoeffizient, des Variabilitätskoeffizient (CV) und der mittleren Differenz (bias) ± 95% „limits of agreement“ (LoA) überprüft. Forschungsziel 2: Sechzehn Freizeitläufer (m=8, f=8; 28 ± 3 y; 1.76 ± 0.09 m; 72 ± 13 kg; 23 ± 2 kg/m²) durchliefen 3 verschiedene Laufprotokolle an jeweils unterschiedlichen Tagen. Am Tag 1 wurde ein maximaler Stufentest durchgeführt, um die IAT und VIAT zu erfassen. Am zweiten und dritten Tag absolvierten die Probanden eine Laufeinheit (30 min) in konstanter Geschwindigkeit bei VIAT, unter Berücksichtigung einer 24 h zuvor durchgeführten und zufällig zugewiesenen Diät mit entweder HC (7g/kg/d) oder LC (3g/kg/d). „Breath-by-breath“-Atemgasdaten wurden kontinuierlich erfasst und für die Bestimmung der Substratoxidation herangezogen. Ernährungsdaten und Unterschiede in Substratoxidation wurden mittels t-test für abhängige Probanden analysiert. Interaktionseffekte zwischen Diät und Geschlecht wurden mittels einer Zwei-Wege ANOVA getestet (α = 0.05). Ergebnisse: Forschungsziel 1: ICC, Pearson’s Korrelationskoeffizient und CV von VPFO und Fatpeak waren 0.98, 0.97, 5.0%; und respektive 0.90, 0.81, 7.0%. Bias ± 95% LoA betrug -0.3 ± 0.9 km/h für VPFO und -2 ± 8% von VO2peak für Fatpeak. Forschungsziel 2: Insgesamt waren IAT 2.74 ± 0.39 mmol/l und VIAT 11.1 ± 1.4 km/h. CHO Oxidation war 3.45 ± 0.08 g/min während HC und respektive 2.90 ± 0.07 g/min während LC Laufeinheiten (P < 0.05). Gleichermaßen war Fettoxidation 0.13 ± 0.03 und 0.36 ± 0.03 g/min (P < 0.05). Frauen hatten im Vergleich zu Männern 14% (P < 0.05) und 12% (P > 0.05) größere Fettoxidation in HC und respektive LC Laufeinheiten. Schlussfolgerungen: Forschungsziel 1: Zusammenfassend wurde eine exzellente relative und absolute Reliabilität für VPFO und Fatpeak gezeigt. Die gefundenen LoA könnten als Basis für zukünftige Trainingssteuerungsempfehlungen genutzt werden, obwohl Fettoxidationsraten bei anhaltenden Ausdauertrainingseinheiten bei dieser Intensität noch untersucht werden müssen. Forschungsziel 2: Hohe CHO-Zufuhr 24 h vor Belastung führt zu einhergehenden höheren CHO-Oxidationsraten und -verwertung, wobei eine niedrige systemische CHO-Verfügbarkeit den Anteil an Fettoxidation im gesamten Energiemetabolismus signifikant erhöht. Die beobachteten Geschlechtsunterschiede unterstreichen die Notwendigkeit einer individualisierten Ernährungsplanung im Vorfeld einer Belastung unter leistungsorientierten Intensitäten. Schlussendlich sollte zukünftige Forschung feststellen, wie hiesige Ergebnisse in Training und Wettkampfsituationen umgesetzt werden können, um somit Trainern und Ernährungswissenschaftlern verbesserte Daten für Trainingsempfehlungen bereitzustellen.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Raul de Souza SilveiraORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-423338
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-42333
Subtitle (English):how intensity and pre-exercise nutrition affect the oxidative regulation of carbohydrate and fat during metabolic targeted running
Subtitle (German):wie Intensität und Ernährung vor dem Sport die oxidative Regulierung von Kohlenhydraten und Fett auf metabolisch gezielte Laufeinheiten wirken
Advisor:Frank Mayer
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2017
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2019/01/18
Release Date:2019/01/25
Tag:Fettoxidation; Kohlenhydratoxidation; individuelle anaerobe Schwelle
carbohydrate oxidation; fat oxidation; individual anaerobic threshold
Pagenumber:iii, 85, v
RVK - Regensburg Classification:ZX 9380, WX 2100, WX 2300
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportmedizin und Prävention
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, Nicht kommerziell, Weitergabe zu gleichen Bedingungen 4.0 International