• search hit 1 of 34
Back to Result List

Onsets and dependencies of strenuous spine bending accelerations in drop landings

Auftreten und Abhängigkeiten von belastenden Winkelbeschleunigungen an der Wirbelsäule bei Sprunglandungen

  • BACKGROUND: Physical activity involving high spinal load has been exposed to possess a crucial impact in the genesis of acute and chronic low back pain and disorder. Vigorous spinal loads are surmised in drop landings, for which strenuous bending loads were formerly evinced for the lower extremity structures. Thus far, clinical studies revealed that repetitive landing impacts can evoke benign structural adaptions or damage to the lumbar vertebrae. Though, causes for these observations are hitherto not conclusively evinced; since actual spinal load has to date not been experimentally documented. Moreover, it is yet undetermined how physiological activation of trunk musculature compensates for landing impact induced spinal loads, and to which extend trunk activity and spinal load are affected by landing demands and performer characteristics. AIMS of this study are 1. the localisation and quantification of spinal bending loads under various landing demands and 2. the identification of compensatory trunk muscular activity pattern, whichBACKGROUND: Physical activity involving high spinal load has been exposed to possess a crucial impact in the genesis of acute and chronic low back pain and disorder. Vigorous spinal loads are surmised in drop landings, for which strenuous bending loads were formerly evinced for the lower extremity structures. Thus far, clinical studies revealed that repetitive landing impacts can evoke benign structural adaptions or damage to the lumbar vertebrae. Though, causes for these observations are hitherto not conclusively evinced; since actual spinal load has to date not been experimentally documented. Moreover, it is yet undetermined how physiological activation of trunk musculature compensates for landing impact induced spinal loads, and to which extend trunk activity and spinal load are affected by landing demands and performer characteristics. AIMS of this study are 1. the localisation and quantification of spinal bending loads under various landing demands and 2. the identification of compensatory trunk muscular activity pattern, which potentially alleviate spinal load magnitudes. Three consecutive Hypotheses (H1 - H3) were hereto postulated: H1 posits that spinal bending loads in segregated motion planes can feasibly and reliably be evaluated from peak spine segmental angular accelerations. H2 furthermore assumes that vertical drop landings elicit highest spine bending load in sagittal flexion of the lumbar spine. Based on these verifications, a second study shall prove the successive hypothesis (H3) that diversified landing conditions, like performer’s landing familiarity and gender, as an implementation of an instantaneous follow-up task, affect the emerging lumbar spinal bending load. Herein it is moreover surmised that lumbar spinal bending loads under distinct landing conditions are predominantly modulated by herewith disparately deployed conditioned pre-activations of trunk muscles. METHODS: To test the above arrayed hypothesis, two successive studies were carried out. In STUDY 1, 17 subjects were repetitively assessed performing various drop landings (heigth: 15, 30, 45, 60cm; unilateral, bilateral, blindfolded, catching a ball) in a test-retest-design. Herein individual peak angular accelerations [αMAX] were derived from three-dimensional motion data of four trunk-segments (upper thoracic, lower thoracic, lumbar, pelvis). αMAX was herein assessed in flexion, lateral flexion, and rotation of each spinal joint, formed by two adjacent segments. Reliability of αMAX within and between test-days was evaluated by CV%, ICC 2.1, TRV%, and Bland & Altman Analysis (BIAS±LoA). Subsequently, peak flexion acceleration of the lumbo-pelvic joint [αFLEX[LS-PV]] was statistically compared to αMAX expressions of each other assessed spinal joint and motion plane (Mean ±SD, Independent Samples T-test). STUDY 2 deliberately assessed mere peak lumbo-pelvic flexion accelerations [αFLEX[LS-PV]] and electro-myographic trunk pre-activity prior to αFLEX[LS-PV] on 43 subjects performing varied landing tasks (height 45cm; with definite or indefinite predictability of a subsequent instant follow up jump). Subjects were contrasted with respect to their previous landing familiarity ( >1000 vs. <100 landings performed in the past 10 years) and gender. Differences of αFLEX[LS-PV] and muscular pre-activity between contrasted subject groups as between landing tasks were equally statistically tested by three-way mixed ANOVA with Post-hoc tests. Associations between αFLEX[LS-PV] and muscular pre-activity were factor-specifically assessed by Spearman’s rank order correlation coefficient (rS). Complementarily, muscular pre-activity was subdivided by landing phases [DROP, IMPACT] and discretely assessed for phase specific associations to αFLEX[LS-PV]. Each muscular activity was moreover pairwise compared between DROP and IMPACT (Mean ±SD, Dependent Samples T-test). RESULTS: αMAX was presented with overall high variability within test-days (CV =36%). Lowest intra-individual variability and highest reproducibility of αMAX between test-days was shown in flexion of the spine. αFLEX[LS-PV] showed largely consistent sig. higher magnitudes compared to αMAX presented in more cranial spinal joints and other motion planes. αFLEX[LS-PV] moreover gradually increased with escalations in landing heights. Landing unfamiliar subjects presented sig. higher αFLEX[LS-PV] in contrast to landing familiar ones (p=.016). M. Obliquus Int. with M. Transversus Abd. (66 ±32%MVC) and M. Erector Spinae (47 ±15%MVC) presented maredly highest activity in contrast to lowest activity of M. Rectus Abd. (10 ±4%MVC). Landing unfamiliar subjects showed compared to landing familiar ones sig. higher activity of M. Obliquus Ext. (17 ±8%MVC, 12 ±7%MVC, p= .044). M. Obliquus Ext. and its co-contraction ratio with M. Erector Spinae moreover exhibited low but sig. positive correlations to αFLEX[LS-PV] (rs=.39, rs=.31). Each trunk muscule distributed larger shares of its activity to DROP, whereas peak activations of most muscles emerged in the proportionally shorter IMPACT phase. Commonly increased muscular pre-activation particularly at IMPACT was found in landings with a contrived follow up jump and in female subjects, whereby αFLEX[LS-PV] was hereof only marginally affected. DISCUSSION: Highest spine segmental angular accelerations in drop landings emerge in sagittal flexion of the lumbar spine. The compensatory stabilisation of the spine appears to be preponderantly provided by a dorso-ventral co-contraction of M. Obliquus Int., M. Transversus Abd. and M. Erector Spinae. Elevated pre-activity of M. Obliquuis Ext. supposably characterises poor landing experience, which might engender increased bending loads to the lumbar spine. A pervasive large variability of spinal angular accelerations measured across all landing types, suggests a multifarious utilisation of diverse mechanisms compensating for spinal impacts in landing performances. A standardised assessment and valid evaluation of landing evoked lumbar bending loads is hereof largley confined. CONCLUSION: Drop landings elicit most strenuous lumbo-pelvic flexion accelerations, which can be appraised as representatives for high energetic bending loads to the spine. Such entail the highest risk to overload the spinal tissue, when landing demands exceed the individual’s landing skill. Previous landing experience and training appears to effectively improve muscular spine stabilisation pattern, diminishing spinal bending loads.show moreshow less
  • HINTERGRUND: Wirbelsäulenbelastungen in Alltagssituationen und während sportlicher Belastung kommt eine hohe Bedeutung mit Blick auf die Entstehung und das Weiterbestehen von akuten und chronischen Rückenbeschwerden zu. Kritisch hohe Wirbelsäulenbelastungen werden bei Sprunglandungen angenommen, während hierzu hochintensive exzentrische Belastungen bislang lediglich für anatomische Strukturen der unteren Extremität nachgewiesen wurden. Vorangegangene klinische Studien konnten zeigen, dass repetitive Landungsstöße sowohl eine strukturelle Anpassung, als auch morphologische Schäden der Lendenwirbelkörper hervorrufen können. Valide Ursachen für diese Beobachtungen sind bislang wissenschaftich nicht abschließend belegt, insbesondere da der experimentelle Nachweis für die hierin vermuteten tatsächlichen Wirbelsäulenbelastungen fehlt. Darüber hinaus ist nicht geklärt in wieweit die physiologisch kompensatorische Aktivierung der Rumpfmuskuatur Einfluß auf die Wirbelsäulenbelastung bei Landungen nehmen, und wie stark Landungs- undHINTERGRUND: Wirbelsäulenbelastungen in Alltagssituationen und während sportlicher Belastung kommt eine hohe Bedeutung mit Blick auf die Entstehung und das Weiterbestehen von akuten und chronischen Rückenbeschwerden zu. Kritisch hohe Wirbelsäulenbelastungen werden bei Sprunglandungen angenommen, während hierzu hochintensive exzentrische Belastungen bislang lediglich für anatomische Strukturen der unteren Extremität nachgewiesen wurden. Vorangegangene klinische Studien konnten zeigen, dass repetitive Landungsstöße sowohl eine strukturelle Anpassung, als auch morphologische Schäden der Lendenwirbelkörper hervorrufen können. Valide Ursachen für diese Beobachtungen sind bislang wissenschaftich nicht abschließend belegt, insbesondere da der experimentelle Nachweis für die hierin vermuteten tatsächlichen Wirbelsäulenbelastungen fehlt. Darüber hinaus ist nicht geklärt in wieweit die physiologisch kompensatorische Aktivierung der Rumpfmuskuatur Einfluß auf die Wirbelsäulenbelastung bei Landungen nehmen, und wie stark Landungs- und Personencharakteristika die Rumpfaktivierung und Lendenwirbel-säulenbeastungen beeinflussen. ZIELSETZUNGEN: Ziele der Untersuchungen sind 1. die Lokalisierung und Quantifizierung von Biegebelastungen der Wirbelsäule unter verschiedenen Landungsbedingungen und 2. die Identifizierung muskulärer Kompensations-mechanismen des Rumpfes, welche das Belastungsausmaß an der Wirbelsäule möglicherweise modulieren. Hierzu wurden drei Hypothesen (H1 – H3) formuliert. In H1 wird postuliert, dass Biegebelastungen in einzelnen Bewegungsebenen der Wirbelsäule als maximale Winkelbeschleunigungen zwischen Wirbelsegmenten, auf der Basis kinematischer Daten, valide und reliabel abgeleitet und evaluiert werden können. In H2 wird angenommen, dass bei vertikalen Sprunglandungen die höchsten Wirbelsäulenbelastungen in der sagittalen Beugung der Lendenwirbelsäule auftreten. Aufbauend auf den Ergebnissen dieser Hypothesen soll eine Folgestudie die Annahme (H3) belegen, dass Landungsbedingungen, wie Vorerfahrungen mit Sprunglandungen, Geschlecht, sowie die Absicht zu unmittelbaren Anschlussbewegungen, die auftretenden Lendenwirbelsäulenbelastungen beeinflussen. Hierzu wird postuliert, dass auftretende Biegebelastungen, in Abhängigkeit obiger Landungsbedingungen, auf einen unterschiedlichen Einsatz von vorwiegend konditionierten muskulären Kompensationsmechanismen des Rumpfes zurückzuführen sind. METHODE: Zur Überprüfung der Hypothesen wurden zwei sukzessive Studien durchgeführt. In STUDIE 1 wurden, zur Repräsentation von Wirbelsäulenbiegebelastungen, 17 Probanden wiederholt bei verschiedenen Landungen (15, 30, 45, 60cm Höhe; einbeinig, beidbeinig, verblindet, beim Fangen eines Balles) in einem Test-Retest-Design gemessen. Hierin wurden individuelle maximale Winkelbeschleunigungen [αMAX] aus drei-dimensionalen Bewegungs-daten zwischen insgesamt 4 Rumpfsegmenten (oberes thorakales-, unteres thorakales-, Lendenwirbelsäulen-, und Becken-Segment) abgeleitet. αMAX wurde hierbei jeweils im Gelenk zwischen zwei benachbarten Segmenten in Flexion, Lateralflexion und Rotation erfasst. Die Reliabilität von αMAX innerhalb und zwischen den Messtagen wurde mittels CV%, ICC 2.1, TRV%, und Bland & Altman Analyse (BIAS±LoA) quantifiziert. In Folge wurden αMAX zwischen dem lumbalen- und dem Beckensegment in der Flexion [αFLEX[LS-PV]] mit allen weiteren gemessenen Segmenten und Bewegungsebenen gegenübergestellt (Mean ±SD, T-Test für unabhängige Stichproben). In STUDIE 2 wurden geziehlt zuvor eruierte höchste maximale sagittale Beugungsbeschleunigung der Lendenwirbelsäule [αFLEX[LS-PV]] und elektro-myografische Rumpfaktivität vor dem Auftreten von αFLEX[LS-PV] während unterschiedlicher Landungen (Höhe 45cm; mit und ohne planbaren Anschlusssprung) an 43 Probanden erfasst. Die Probanden unterschieden sich bezüglich ihrer Landungsvorerfahrung ( >1000 vs. <100 Landungen in den letzten 10 Jahren) und ihres Geschlechtes. Unterschiede zwischen Landungsvorerfahrung und Geschlecht sowie zwischen unterschiedlichen Landungstypen wurden gleichermaßen durch dreifaktorielle ANOVA mit Post-hoc Tests für αFLEX[LS-PV], und muskuläre Voraktivierung getestet. Abhängigkeiten von αFLEX[LS-PV] zu muskulärer Voraktivierung des Rumpfes wurde durch faktorspezifische Rangkorrelations-analyse (rs) berechnet. In der Folge wurden muskuläre Rumpfaktivitäten in Landephasen [DROP, IMPACT] unterteilt und analog im Einzelnen nach ihren Assoziationen zu αFLEX[LS-PV] getestet. Zudem wurde jegliche Muskelaktivierung paarig zwischen DROP und IMPACT verglichen (Mean ±SD, T-Test für abhängige Stichproben). ERGEBNISSE: Die Ausprägung von αMAX zeigte insgesamt hohe Variabilität innerhalb eines Testtages (CV =36%). Geringste intra-individuelle Variabilität und zugleich höchste Reproduzierbarkeit zwischen den Test-Tagen wurde für αMAX in Flexion der Wirbelsäule gefunden. αFLEX[LS-PV] zeigte nahezu durchgehend sig. höhere Werte im Vergleich zu αMAX kranialerer Gelenke und anderer Bewegungsebenen. αFLEX[LS-PV] stieg zudem graduell mit zunehmenden Landungshöhen. Landungsunerfahrene Probanden wiesen im Vergleich zu Probanden mit Vorerfahrung signifikant höhere αFLEX[LS-PV] auf (p=.016). Markant höchste muskuläre Aktivität wurde von M. Obliquus Int. mit M. Transversus Abd. (66 ±32%MVC) und M. Erector Spinae (47 ±15%MVC), verglichen zu geringster Aktivität von M. Rectus Abd. (10 ±4%MVC) dargeboten. Bei Landungsunerfahrenen wurde im Vergleich zu Landungserfahrenen eine sig. höhere Aktivität des M. Obliquus Ext. gemessen (17 ±8%MVC, 12 ±7%MVC, p= .044). Zudem konnten schwache aber sig. positive Korrelation zwsichen der Aktivität des M. Obliquus Ext. bzw. dessen Kokontraktion mit dem M. Erector Spinae zu αFLEX[LS-PV] nachgewiesen werden (rs=.39, rs=.31). Die Rumpfmuskulatur zeigte insgesamt anteilig mehr Bereitstellung während DROP, wobei Spitzenaktivitäten nahezu aller Rumpfmuskeln in der proportional kürzeren IMPACT-Phase auftraten. Frauen und Landungen mit geplantem unmittelbarem Anschlussspung zeigten insgesamt höhere Voraktivierung der Rumpf-muskulatur, vorallem in IMPACT, wobei sich αFLEX[LS-PV] unter diesen Bedingungen nur insignifikant von anderen Landungen unterschied. DISKUSSION: Bei Landungen treten höchste segmentale Winkelbeschleunigungen in sagittaler Beugung der Lendenwirbelsäule auf. Die kompensatorische Stabilisation des Rumpfes scheint dabei maßgeblich durch eine dorso-ventrale Kokontraktion des M. Obliquus Int., M. Transversus Abd. und dem M. Erector Spinae zu erfolgen. Eine hohe Voraktivierung des M. Obliquuis Ext. kann als Maß einer geringen Landungserfahrung diskutiert werden und führt möglicherweise zu erhöhten Biegebelastungen an der Lendenwirbelsäule. Die in allen untersuchten Landungen dargebotene hohe Variabilität gemessener Winkelbeschleunigungen lassen auf sehr variabel eingesetzte Impulskompensationsmechanismen bei der Durchführungen von Landungen schließen. Eine standardiserte Erfassung und valide Einschätzung von Biegebelastungen der Lendenwirbelsäule bei Sprunglandungen ist hierdurch stark eingeschränkt. SCHLUSSFOLGERUNG: Sprunglandungen verursachen höchst belastende segmentale Winkelbeschleunigungen an der Lendenwirbelsäule, vorrangig in der Flexion. Diese können physiologisch bedingt als Maß für hoch energetische Biegebelastungen der Wirbelsäule verstanden werden. Ein mögliches Risiko hieraus resultierender struktureller Überlastung muss insbesondere in Betracht gezogen werden, wenn Landungsanforderungen die individuellen Landungfähigkeiten übersteigen. Eine probate muskuläre Wirbelsäulen-stabilisation bzw. derer regelmäßiges Training in der Durchführung von Landungsvorgängen scheint erforderlich um auftretende Biegebelastungen zu reduzieren.show moreshow less

Download full text files

  • SHA-1:bcda4f0ca3ac6866328346b153beba9593b2cf7e

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Gerrit HainORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-427461
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-42746
Referee:Frank MeyerORCiDGND, Heiner BaurORCiDGND, Hendrik SchmidtGND
Advisor:Frank Mayer, Steffen Mueller
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2019/03/21
Release Date:2019/04/18
Tag:Belastung; Beschleunigung; Landung; Rumpfmuskulatur; Wirbelsäule
acceleration; landing; load; spine; trunk muscles
Pagenumber:XVI, 118
RVK - Regensburg Classification:ZX 9000, ZX 9620, WW 5700
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportmedizin und Prävention
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, 4.0 International