• search hit 1 of 1
Back to Result List

Concurrent validity of the Gyko inertial sensor system for the assessment of vertical jump height in female sub-elite youth soccer players

  • Background: The aim of the present study was to verify concurrent validity of the Gyko inertial sensor system for the assessment of vertical jump height. - Methods: Nineteen female sub-elite youth soccer players (mean age: 14.7 ± 0.6 years) performed three trials of countermovement (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ), respectively. Maximal vertical jump height was simultaneously quantified with the Gyko system, a Kistler force-plate (i.e., gold standard), and another criterion device that is frequently used in the field, the Optojump system. - Results: Compared to the force-plate, the Gyko system determined significant systematic bias for mean CMJ (−0.66 cm, p < 0.01, d = 1.41) and mean SJ (−0.91 cm, p < 0.01, d = 1.69) height. Random bias was ± 3.2 cm for CMJ and ± 4.0 cm for SJ height and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were “excellent” (ICC = 0.87 for CMJ and 0.81 for SJ). Compared to the Optojump device, the Gyko system detected a significant systematic bias for mean CMJ (0.55 cm, p < 0.05, d = 0.94) but not for mean SJ (0.39Background: The aim of the present study was to verify concurrent validity of the Gyko inertial sensor system for the assessment of vertical jump height. - Methods: Nineteen female sub-elite youth soccer players (mean age: 14.7 ± 0.6 years) performed three trials of countermovement (CMJ) and squat jumps (SJ), respectively. Maximal vertical jump height was simultaneously quantified with the Gyko system, a Kistler force-plate (i.e., gold standard), and another criterion device that is frequently used in the field, the Optojump system. - Results: Compared to the force-plate, the Gyko system determined significant systematic bias for mean CMJ (−0.66 cm, p < 0.01, d = 1.41) and mean SJ (−0.91 cm, p < 0.01, d = 1.69) height. Random bias was ± 3.2 cm for CMJ and ± 4.0 cm for SJ height and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were “excellent” (ICC = 0.87 for CMJ and 0.81 for SJ). Compared to the Optojump device, the Gyko system detected a significant systematic bias for mean CMJ (0.55 cm, p < 0.05, d = 0.94) but not for mean SJ (0.39 cm) height. Random bias was ± 3.3 cm for CMJ and ± 4.2 cm for SJ height and ICC values were “excellent” (ICC = 0.86 for CMJ and 0.82 for SJ). - Conclusion: Consequently, apparatus specific regression equations were provided to estimate true vertical jump height for the Kistler force-plate and the Optojump device from Gyko-derived data. Our findings indicate that the Gyko system cannot be used interchangeably with a Kistler force-plate and the Optojump device in trained individuals. It is suggested that practitioners apply the correction equations to estimate vertical jump height for the force-plate and the Optojump system from Gyko-derived data.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Melanie LesinskiORCiDGND, Thomas MuehlbauerORCiDGND, Urs GranacherORCiDGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-400967
Series (Serial Number):Postprints der Universität Potsdam : Humanwissenschaftliche Reihe (341)
Document Type:Postprint
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2017/09/29
Year of Completion:2017
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Release Date:2017/09/29
Tag:Accelerometer; Athlete testing; Countermovement jump; Field test; Lower-extremity muscle power; Squat jump
Pagenumber:9
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportwissenschaft
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Peer Review:Referiert
Publication Way:Open Access
Grantor:BioMed Central
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, 4.0 International