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Dual role of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein MOCS3 in tRNA thiolation and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in humans

  • We studied two pathways that involve the transfer of persulfide sulfur in humans, molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and tRNA thiolation. Investigations using human cells showed that the two-domain protein MOCS3 is shared between both pathways. MOCS3 has an N-terminal adenylation domain and a C-terminal rhodanese-like domain. We showed that MOCS3 activates both MOCS2A and URM1 by adenylation and a subsequent sulfur transfer step for the formation of the thiocarboxylate group at the C terminus of each protein. MOCS2A and URM1 are beta-grasp fold proteins that contain a highly conserved C-terminal double glycine motif. The role of the terminal glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 was examined for the interaction and the cellular localization with MOCS3. Deletion of the C-terminal glycine of either MOCS2A or URM1 resulted in a loss of interaction with MOCS3. Enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein fusions of the proteins were constructed, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency was determined byWe studied two pathways that involve the transfer of persulfide sulfur in humans, molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and tRNA thiolation. Investigations using human cells showed that the two-domain protein MOCS3 is shared between both pathways. MOCS3 has an N-terminal adenylation domain and a C-terminal rhodanese-like domain. We showed that MOCS3 activates both MOCS2A and URM1 by adenylation and a subsequent sulfur transfer step for the formation of the thiocarboxylate group at the C terminus of each protein. MOCS2A and URM1 are beta-grasp fold proteins that contain a highly conserved C-terminal double glycine motif. The role of the terminal glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 was examined for the interaction and the cellular localization with MOCS3. Deletion of the C-terminal glycine of either MOCS2A or URM1 resulted in a loss of interaction with MOCS3. Enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein fusions of the proteins were constructed, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency was determined by the decrease in the donor lifetime. The cellular localization results showed that extension of the C terminus with an additional glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 altered the localization of MOCS3 from the cytosol to the nucleus.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Mita Mullick Chowdhury, Carsten DoscheGND, Hans-Gerd Loehmannsröben, Silke Leimkühler
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.351429
ISSN:0021-9258 (print)
Parent Title (English):The journal of biological chemistry
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Place of publication:Bethesda
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2012
Year of Completion:2012
Release Date:2017/03/26
Volume:287
Issue:21
Pagenumber:11
First Page:17297
Last Page:17307
Funder:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft [LE1171/5-3]
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert