• search hit 37 of 261
Back to Result List

Development of a reliable and environmentally friendly synthesis for fluorescence carbon nanodots

Entwicklung einer zuverlässigen und umweltfreundlichen Synthese für fluoreszierende Kohlenstoff-Nanopunkte

  • Carbon nanodots (CNDs) have generated considerable attention due to their promising properties, e.g. high water solubility, chemical inertness, resistance to photobleaching, high biocompatibility and ease of functionalization. These properties render them ideal for a wide range of functions, e.g. electrochemical applications, waste water treatment, (photo)catalysis, bio-imaging and bio-technology, as well as chemical sensing, and optoelectronic devices like LEDs. In particular, the ability to prepare CNDs from a wide range of accessible organic materials makes them a potential alternative for conventional organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in various applications. However, current synthesis methods are typically expensive and depend on complex and time-consuming processes or severe synthesis conditions and toxic chemicals. One way to reduce overall preparation costs is the use of biological waste as starting material. Hence, natural carbon sources such as pomelo peal, egg white and egg yolk, orange juice, and evenCarbon nanodots (CNDs) have generated considerable attention due to their promising properties, e.g. high water solubility, chemical inertness, resistance to photobleaching, high biocompatibility and ease of functionalization. These properties render them ideal for a wide range of functions, e.g. electrochemical applications, waste water treatment, (photo)catalysis, bio-imaging and bio-technology, as well as chemical sensing, and optoelectronic devices like LEDs. In particular, the ability to prepare CNDs from a wide range of accessible organic materials makes them a potential alternative for conventional organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in various applications. However, current synthesis methods are typically expensive and depend on complex and time-consuming processes or severe synthesis conditions and toxic chemicals. One way to reduce overall preparation costs is the use of biological waste as starting material. Hence, natural carbon sources such as pomelo peal, egg white and egg yolk, orange juice, and even eggshells, to name a few; have been used for the preparation of CNDs. While the use of waste is desirable, especially to avoid competition with essential food production, most starting-materials lack the essential purity and structural homogeneity to obtain homogeneous carbon dots. Furthermore, most synthesis approaches reported to date require extensive purification steps and have resulted in carbon dots with heterogeneous photoluminescent properties and indefinite composition. For this reason, among others, the relationship between CND structure (e.g. size, edge shape, functional groups and overall composition) and photophysical properties is yet not fully understood. This is particularly true for carbon dots displaying selective luminescence (one of their most intriguing properties), i.e. their PL emission wavelength can be tuned by varying the excitation wavelength. In this work, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain CNDs with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch, carboxylic acids and Tris-EDTA (TE) buffer as carbon- and nitrogen source, respectively. The presented microwave-assisted hydrothermal precursor carbonization (MW-hPC) is characterized by its cost-efficiency, simplicity, short reaction times, low environmental footprint, and high yields of approx. 80% (w/w). Furthermore, only a single synthesis step is necessary to obtain homogeneous water-soluble CNDs with no need for further purification. Depending on starting materials and reaction conditions different types of CNDs have been prepared. The as-prepared CNDs exhibit reproducible, highly homogeneous and favourable PL properties with narrow emission bands (approx. 70nm FWHM), are non-blinking, and are ready to use without need for further purification, modification or surface passivation agents. Furthermore, the CNDs are comparatively small (approx. 2.0nm to 2.4nm) with narrow size distributions; are stable over a long period of time (at least one year), either in solution or as a dried solid; and maintain their PL properties when re-dispersed in solution. Depending on CND type, the PL quantum yield (PLQY) can be adjusted from as low as 1% to as high as 90%; one of the highest reported PLQY values (for CNDs) so far. An essential part of this work was the utilization of a microwave synthesis reactor, allowing various batch sizes and precise control over reaction temperature and -time, pressure, and heating- and cooling rate, while also being safe to operate at elevated reaction conditions (e.g. 230 ±C and 30 bar). The hereby-achieved high sample throughput allowed, for the first time, the thorough investigation of a wide range of synthesis parameters, providing valuable insight into the CND formation. The influence of carbon- and nitrogen source, precursor concentration and -combination, reaction time and -temperature, batch size, and post-synthesis purification steps were carefully investigated regarding their influence on the optical properties of as-synthesized CNDs. In addition, the change in photophysical properties resulting from the conversion of CND solution into solid and back into the solution was investigated. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initial brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly yellow to brown solid which recovers PL in aqueous solution. Selected CND samples were also subject to EDX, FTIR, NMR, PL lifetime (TCSPC), particle size (TEM), TGA and XRD analysis. Besides structural characterization, the pH- and excitation dependent PL characteristics (i.e. selective luminescence) were examined; giving inside into the origin of photophysical properties and excitation dependent behaviour of CNDs. The obtained results support the notion that for CNDs the nature of the surface states determines the PL properties and that excitation dependent behaviour is caused by the “Giant Red-Edge Excitation Shift” (GREES).show moreshow less
  • Kohlenstoff-Nanopunkte (CNDs, engl. carbon nanodots) haben im letzten Jahrzehnt insbesondere durch ihre vielversprechenden Eigenschaften immer mehr an Popularität gewonnen. CNDs zeichnen sich insbesondere durch ihre Wasserlöslichkeit, hohe chemische Stabilität, Biokompatibilität, hohe Resistenz gegen Photobleichen, und die Möglichkeit zur Oberflächenfunktionalisierung aus. Diese Eigenschaften machen sie somit ideal für eine breite Palette von Anwendungen: z.B. Abwasserbehandlung, (Foto-) Katalyse, Bioimaging und Biotechnologie, chemische Sensorik, sowie elektrochemische- und optoelektronische Anwendungen (z.B. LEDs). Insbesondere die Möglichkeit, CNDs aus einer Vielzahl organischer Materialien herzustellen, machen sie zu einer möglichen Alternative für herkömmliche organische Farbstoffe und Halbleiter-Quantenpunkte (QDs). Derzeitigen Synthesestrategien erweisen sich jedoch häufig als teuer, komplex und zeitaufwändig; bzw. benötigen toxischen Chemikalien und/oder drastische Reaktionsbedingungen. Eine Möglichkeit, die HerstellungskostenKohlenstoff-Nanopunkte (CNDs, engl. carbon nanodots) haben im letzten Jahrzehnt insbesondere durch ihre vielversprechenden Eigenschaften immer mehr an Popularität gewonnen. CNDs zeichnen sich insbesondere durch ihre Wasserlöslichkeit, hohe chemische Stabilität, Biokompatibilität, hohe Resistenz gegen Photobleichen, und die Möglichkeit zur Oberflächenfunktionalisierung aus. Diese Eigenschaften machen sie somit ideal für eine breite Palette von Anwendungen: z.B. Abwasserbehandlung, (Foto-) Katalyse, Bioimaging und Biotechnologie, chemische Sensorik, sowie elektrochemische- und optoelektronische Anwendungen (z.B. LEDs). Insbesondere die Möglichkeit, CNDs aus einer Vielzahl organischer Materialien herzustellen, machen sie zu einer möglichen Alternative für herkömmliche organische Farbstoffe und Halbleiter-Quantenpunkte (QDs). Derzeitigen Synthesestrategien erweisen sich jedoch häufig als teuer, komplex und zeitaufwändig; bzw. benötigen toxischen Chemikalien und/oder drastische Reaktionsbedingungen. Eine Möglichkeit, die Herstellungskosten von CNDs zu reduzieren, ist die Verwendung von biologischem Abfall als Ausgangsmaterial. So wurden bereits eine Vielzahl an natürlichen Kohlenstoffquellen, z.B. Pomelo-Schale, Eiweiß und Eigelb, Orangensaft und sogar Eierschalen, für die Darstellung von CNDs verwendet. Während die Verwendung von biologischem Abfall wünschenswert ist, insbesondere um Wettbewerb mit der Nahrungsmittelproduktion zu vermeiden, fehlt den meisten Ausgangsmaterialien jedoch die notwendige Reinheit und strukturelle Homogenität um einheitliche CNDs zu erhalten. So führen bisherige Syntheseansätze oft zu CNDs mit heterogenen photophysikalischen Eigenschaften und unbestimmter Zusammensetzung. Für die Untersuchung des Zusammenhangs zwischen CND Struktur und photophysikalischen Eigenschaften werden aber möglichst homogene und vergleichbare Proben benötigt. In dieser Arbeit wird daher eine neue, zuverlässige, ökonomische und umweltfreundliche Einstufen-Synthese zur Darstellung von CNDs mit klar definierten und reproduzierbaren Photolumineszenz- (PL) -Eigenschaften vorgestellt. Die vorgestellte Methode basiert auf der mikrowellenunterstützten, hydrothermischen Behandlung (MW-hPC, engl. microwaveassisted hydrothermal precursor carbonization) wässriger Lösungen aus Stärke, Carbonsäuren (als Kohlenstoffquelle) und Tris-EDTA (TE) -Puffer (als Stickstoffquelle). Die MW-hPC zeichnet sich insbesondere durch die hohe Reproduzierbarkeit, einfache Handhabung, geringen Reaktionszeiten, geringe Umweltbelastung, Kosteneffizienz und die hohen Ausbeuten von ca. 80% (w/w) aus. Darüber hinaus wird nur ein einziger Syntheseschritt (ohne weitere Aufreinigung) benötigt um homogene, wasserlösliche CNDs zu erhalten. In Abhängig der gewählten Ausgangsmaterialen und Reaktionsbedingungen können verschiedene Typen an CNDs gewonnen werden. Die so gewonnen CNDs sind verhältnismäßig klein (ca. 2.0nm- 2.4nm); besitzen eine geringe Größenverteilung, hochgradig homogenen PL-Eigenschaften, und geringen Halbwertsbreiten (FWHM) von ca. 70nm. Darüber hinaus erwiesen sie sich als nicht blinkend; sind langzeitstabil (min. ein Jahr) sowohl in Lösung als auch als Feststoff; und sind direkt gebrauchsfertig, d.h. benötigen keine weitere Aufreinigung oder Oberflächenpassivierung. In Abhängigkeit vom CND-Typ kann die PL-Quantenausbeute zwischen 1% bis 90% betragen; einer der höchsten Werte der je (für CNDs) erreicht wurde. Ein wesentlicher Bestandteil dieser Arbeit war die Verwendung eines Mikrowellensynthese- Reaktors (MiWR) und die damit einhergehende präzise Kontrolle über die Reaktionstemperatur und -zeit, den Druck, und die Heiz- und Abkühlgeschwindigkeit. Des Weiteren ermöglichte der MiWR unterschiedliche Ansatzgrößen und das sichere Arbeiten bei erhöhten Reaktionsbedingungen (z.B. 230 ±C und 30 bar). Der hierdurch erreichte hohe Probendurchsatz ermöglichte somit erstmals die sorgfältige Untersuchung einer Vielzahl an Syntheseparametern hinsichtlich ihres Einflusses auf die photophysikalischen Eigenschaften der dargestellten CNDs. Die untersuchten Parameter reichen hierbei von der Reaktionstemperatur und -zeit über die Edukt-Konzentration und -Kombination (Kohlenstoff- und Stickstoffquelle) bis hin zur Ansatzgröße. Bemerkenswerterweise, und unabhängig vom CND-Typ, transformieren die ursprünglich braunen CND-Lösungen während der Trocknung zu einem nicht fluoreszierenden, weißen/leicht gelblich bis bräunlichen Feststoff; und regenerieren ihre photophysikalischen Eigenschaften verlustfrei in wässriger Lösung. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurden ausgewählte CND-Proben der EDX-, FTIR-, NMR-, TCSPC-, Partikelgrößen (TEM)-, TGA- und XRD-Analyse unterzogen. Die hierbei gewonnenen Erkenntnisse stützen die Theorie, dass die photophysikalischen Eigenschaften der CNDs durch ihre Oberflächenzustände bestimmt werden und dass die s.g. ”Riesen-Rotkanten-Anregungsverschiebung” (GREES, engl. Giant Red Edge Excitation Shift) eine mögliche Ursache für die häufig beobachtete Anregungswellenlängenabhängigkeit der Emissionswellenlänge (bzw. selektive Lumineszenz) in CNDs ist.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Till Thomas MeilingORCiDGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-410160
Subtitle (English):preparation and characterisation of excellent and well-defined carbon nanodots by a fast, simple and cost-efficient synthesis method; with special focus on future exploration and large scale applications
Subtitle (German):Herstellung und Charakterisierung von hochwertigen und klar definierten Kohlenstoff-Nanopunkten mit Hilfe einer schnellen, einfachen, und kosteneffizienten Synthesemethode; mit speziellem Fokus auf ihre zukünftige Erforschung und breite Anwendung
Advisor:Ilko Bald, Hans-Gerd Löhmannsröben
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2018
Year of Completion:2017
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2018/03/05
Release Date:2018/05/17
Tag:Fluoreszenz; Kohlenstoff-Nanopunkte; Kohlenstoff-Punkte; hohe Quantenausbeute; mikrowellengestützte Synthese; weißer Kohlenstoff
carbon dots; carbon nanodots; fluorescence; high quantum yield; microwave synthesis; white carbon
Pagenumber:198
RVK - Regensburg Classification:VE 5070, VE 9857
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Chemie
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 54 Chemie / 540 Chemie und zugeordnete Wissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht