• search hit 30 of 261
Back to Result List

Toward ultimate control of polymerization and catalytic property

In Richtung ultimative Kontrolle der Polymerisation und der katalytischen Eigenschaft

  • Reversible-deactivation radical polymerization (RDRP) is without any doubt one of the most prevalent and powerful strategies for polymer synthesis, by which well-defined living polymers with targeted molecular weight (MW), low molar dispersity (Ɖ) and diverse morphologies can be prepared in a controlled fashion. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) as one of the most extensive studied types of RDRP has been particularly emphasized due to the high accessibility to hybrid materials, multifunctional copolymers and diverse end group functionalities via commercially available precursors. However, due to catalyst-induced side reactions and chain-chain coupling termination in bulk environment, synthesis of high MW polymers with uniform chain length (low Ɖ) and highly-preserved chain-end fidelity is usually challenging. Besides, owing to the inherited radical nature, the control of microstructure, namely tacticity control, is another laborious task. Considering the applied catalysts, the utilization of large amounts of non-reusableReversible-deactivation radical polymerization (RDRP) is without any doubt one of the most prevalent and powerful strategies for polymer synthesis, by which well-defined living polymers with targeted molecular weight (MW), low molar dispersity (Ɖ) and diverse morphologies can be prepared in a controlled fashion. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) as one of the most extensive studied types of RDRP has been particularly emphasized due to the high accessibility to hybrid materials, multifunctional copolymers and diverse end group functionalities via commercially available precursors. However, due to catalyst-induced side reactions and chain-chain coupling termination in bulk environment, synthesis of high MW polymers with uniform chain length (low Ɖ) and highly-preserved chain-end fidelity is usually challenging. Besides, owing to the inherited radical nature, the control of microstructure, namely tacticity control, is another laborious task. Considering the applied catalysts, the utilization of large amounts of non-reusable transition metal ions which lead to cumbersome purification process, product contamination and complicated reaction procedures all delimit the scope ATRP techniques. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging type of porous materials combing the properties of both organic polymers and inorganic crystals, characterized with well-defined crystalline framework, high specific surface area, tunable porous structure and versatile nanochannel functionalities. These promising properties of MOFs have thoroughly revolutionized academic research and applications in tremendous aspects, including gas processing, sensing, photoluminescence, catalysis and compartmentalized polymerization. Through functionalization, the microenvironment of MOF nanochannel can be precisely devised and tailored with specified functional groups for individual host-guest interactions. Furthermore, properties of high transition metal density, accessible catalytic sites and crystalline particles all indicate MOFs as prominent heterogeneous catalysts which open a new avenue towards unprecedented catalytic performance. Although beneficial properties in catalysis, high agglomeration and poor dispersibility restrain the potential catalytic capacity to certain degree. Due to thriving development of MOF sciences, fundamental polymer science is undergoing a significant transformation, and the advanced polymerization strategy can eventually refine the intrinsic drawbacks of MOF solids reversely. Therefore, in the present thesis, a combination of low-dimensional polymers with crystalline MOFs is demonstrated as a robust and comprehensive approach to gain the bilateral advantages from polymers (flexibility, dispersibility) and MOFs (stability, crystallinity). The utilization of MOFs for in-situ polymerizations and catalytic purposes can be realized to synthesize intriguing polymers in a facile and universal process to expand the applicability of conventional ATRP methodology. On the other hand, through the formation of MOF/polymer composites by surface functionalization, the MOF particles with environment-adjustable dispersibility and high catalytic property can be as-prepared. In the present thesis, an approach via combination of confined porous textures from MOFs and controlled radical polymerization is proposed to advance synthetic polymer chemistry. Zn2(bdc)2(dabco) (Znbdc) and the initiator-functionalized Zn MOFs, ZnBrbdc, are utilized as a reaction environment for in-situ polymerization of various size-dependent methacrylate monomers (i.e. methyl, ethyl, benzyl and isobornyl methacrylate) through (surface-initiated) activators regenerated by electron transfer (ARGET/SI-ARGET) ATRP, resulting in polymers with control over dispersity, end functionalities and tacticity with respect to distinct molecular size. While the functionalized MOFs are applied, due to the strengthened compartmentalization effect, the accommodated polymers with molecular weight up to 392,000 can be achieved. Moreover, a significant improvement in end-group fidelity and stereocontrol can be observed. The results highlight a combination of MOFs and ATRP is a promising and universal methodology to synthesize versatile well-defined polymers with high molecular weight, increment in isotactic trial and the preserved chain-end functionality. More than being a host only, MOFs can act as heterogeneous catalysts for metal-catalyzed polymerizations. A Cu(II)-based MOF, Cu2(bdc)2(dabco), is demonstrated as a heterogeneous, universal catalyst for both thermal or visible light-triggered ARGET ATRP with expanded monomer range. The accessible catalytic metal sites enable the Cu(II) MOF to polymerize various monomers, including benzyl methacrylate (BzMA), styrene, methyl methacrylate (MMA), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) in the fashion of ARGET ATRP. Furthermore, due to the robust frameworks, surpassing the conventional homogeneous catalyst, the Cu(II) MOF can tolerate strongly coordinating monomers and polymerize challenging monomers (i.e. 4-vinyl pyridine, 2-vinyl pyridine and isoprene), in a well-controlled fashion. Therefore, a synthetic procedure can be significantly simplified, and catalyst-resulted chelation can be avoided as well. Like other heterogeneous catalysts, the Cu(II) MOF catalytic complexes can be easily collected by centrifugation and recycled for an arbitrary amount of times. The Cu(II) MOF, composed of photostimulable metal sites, is further used to catalyze controlled photopolymerization under visible light and requires no external photoinitiator, dye sensitizer or ligand. A simple light trigger allows the photoreduction of Cu(II) to the active Cu(I) state, enabling controlled polymerization in the form of ARGET ATRP. More than polymerization application, the synergic effect between MOF frameworks and incorporated nucleophilic monomers/molecules is also observed, where the formation of associating complexes is able to adjust the photochemical and electrochemical properties of the Cu(II) MOF, altering the band gap and light harvesting behavior. Owing to the tunable photoabsorption property resulting from the coordinating guests, photoinduced Reversible-deactivation radical polymerization (PRDRP) can be achieved to further simplify and fasten the polymerization. More than the adjustable photoabsorption ability, the synergistic strategy via a combination of controlled/living polymerization technique and crystalline MOFs can be again evidenced as demonstrated in the MOF-based heterogeneous catalysts with enhanced dispersibility in solution. Through introducing hollow pollen pivots with surface immobilized environment-responsive polymer, PDMAEMA, highly dispersed MOF nanocrystals can be prepared after associating on polymer brushes via the intrinsic amine functionality in each DMAEMA monomer. Intriguingly, the pollen-PDMAEMA composite can serve as a “smart” anchor to trap nanoMOF particles with improved dispersibility, and thus to significantly enhance liquid-phase photocatalytic performance. Furthermore, the catalytic activity can be switched on and off via stimulable coil-to-globule transition of the PDMAEMA chains exposing or burying MOF catalytic sites, respectively.show moreshow less
  • Die sogenannte „Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization (RDRP)“ ist eine der am häufigsten genutzten und leistungsstärksten Methoden für die Polymersynthese, mit Hilfe derer genau definierte Polymere mit gezieltem Molekulargewicht (MW), niedriger molarer Dispersität (Ɖ) und verschiedenen Morphologien hergestellt werden können. Die sogenannte „Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) ist eine der am intensivsten untersuchten RDRP Methoden, da sie eine hohe Zugänglichkeit zu Hybridmaterialien, multifunktionellen Copolymeren und diversen Endgruppenfunktionalitäten ermöglicht. Jedoch ist die Synthese von Polymeren mit hohem Molekulargewicht, niedriger Dispersität, exakten Endgruppen und der Steuerung der Taktizität für gewöhnlich schwierig. Außerdem führt die Verwendung von großen Mengen an nichtwiederverwendbaren Übergangsmetallionen zu einem umständlichen Reinigungsprozess, wobei Produktverunreinigungen und komplizierte Reaktionsverfahren die Anwendungsbereiche der ATRP Techniken weiter begrenzen. “Metal-organic frameworksDie sogenannte „Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization (RDRP)“ ist eine der am häufigsten genutzten und leistungsstärksten Methoden für die Polymersynthese, mit Hilfe derer genau definierte Polymere mit gezieltem Molekulargewicht (MW), niedriger molarer Dispersität (Ɖ) und verschiedenen Morphologien hergestellt werden können. Die sogenannte „Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) ist eine der am intensivsten untersuchten RDRP Methoden, da sie eine hohe Zugänglichkeit zu Hybridmaterialien, multifunktionellen Copolymeren und diversen Endgruppenfunktionalitäten ermöglicht. Jedoch ist die Synthese von Polymeren mit hohem Molekulargewicht, niedriger Dispersität, exakten Endgruppen und der Steuerung der Taktizität für gewöhnlich schwierig. Außerdem führt die Verwendung von großen Mengen an nichtwiederverwendbaren Übergangsmetallionen zu einem umständlichen Reinigungsprozess, wobei Produktverunreinigungen und komplizierte Reaktionsverfahren die Anwendungsbereiche der ATRP Techniken weiter begrenzen. “Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)“ sind eine vielversprechende Art von porösen Materialien, die die Eigenschaften von organischen Polymeren und anorganischen Kristallen in sich vereinen und sich durch ein kristallines Gerüst, hohe spezifische Oberflächen, einstellbare poröse Strukturen und vielseitige Nanokanal-Funktionalitäten auszeichnen. Diese vielversprechenden Eigenschaften von MOFs haben die akademische Forschung und ihre Anwendung vielseitig revolutioniert, einschließlich der Photolumineszenz, Katalyse und kompartimentierter Polymerisation. Durch gezielte Funktionalisierung kann die Mikroumgebung von MOF-Nanokanälen mit spezifischen funktionellen Gruppen für individuelle Schlüssel-Schloss-Wechselwirkungen präzise entworfen und maßgeschneidert werden. Darüber hinaus weist die hohe Übergangsmetalldichte, zugängliche katalytische Zentren und die kristallinen Partikel auf MOFs als herausragende heterogene Katalysatoren hin, welche eine vielversprechende Möglichkeit für zukünftige Anwendungen erlauben. Ungeachtet der vorteilhaften Eigenschaften in der Katalyse halten eine hohe Agglomerationstendenz und die schlechte Dispergierbarkeit die potentiellen katalytischen Vorteile bis zu einem gewissen Grad zurück. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde eine Kombination von niederdimensionalen Polymeren mit kristallinen MOFs als robuster und umfassender Ansatz zur Erzielung der bilateralen Vorteile von Polymeren (Flexibilität, Dispergierbarkeit) und MOFs (Stabilität, Kristallinität) gezeigt. Die Verwendung von MOFs für in-situ-Polymerisationen und katalytische Zwecke kann realisiert werden, um verblüffende Polymere in einem einfachen und universellen Prozess zu synthetisieren, um die Anwendbarkeit herkömmlicher ATRP Methoden zu erweitern. MOFs können nicht nur als Gerüst dienen, sondern auch selbst als heterogene Katalysatoren für metall-katalysierte Polymerisationen, bedingt durch thermische Behandlung oder sichtbares Licht, fungieren. Auf der anderen Seite können MOF / Polymer-Komposite durch Oberflächenfunktionalisierung hergestellt werden, welche sich schließlich durch einstellbare Dispergierbarkeit und guter katalytischer Eigenschaften auszeichnen.show moreshow less

Download full text files

  • lee_diss.pdfeng
    (17829KB)

    SHA-1:24fde5267b0d8f7ec9238ca6a5bd4a2419fc4889

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Hui-Chun LeeORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-414973
Subtitle (English):a combination of metal-organic frameworks and ATRP
Subtitle (German):eine Kombination von Metall-organischen Gerüsten und ATRP
Advisor:Markus Antonietti
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2018
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2018/06/13
Release Date:2018/08/20
Tag:ATRP; Flüssigphasenkatalyse; Umweltreaktion; begrenzte Polymerisation; kontrollierte Polymerisation; metallorganischen Gerüstverbindungen; sichtbares Licht Photokatalyse
ATRP; confined polymerization; controlled polymerization; environmental response; liquid-phase catalysis; metal organic framework; visible light photocatalysis
Pagenumber:vii, iii, 150
RVK - Regensburg Classification:VE 5070, VE 7047
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Chemie
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 54 Chemie / 540 Chemie und zugeordnete Wissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, 4.0 International