• search hit 43 of 558
Back to Result List

Signals stored in sediment

Signale in Sedimenten

  • Tectonic and climatic boundary conditions determine the amount and the characteristics (size distribution and composition) of sediment that is generated and exported from mountain regions. On millennial timescales, rivers adjust their morphology such that the incoming sediment (Qs,in) can be transported downstream by the available water discharge (Qw). Changes in climatic and tectonic boundary conditions thus trigger an adjustment of the downstream river morphology. Understanding the sensitivity of river morphology to perturbations in boundary conditions is therefore of major importance, for example, for flood assessments, infrastructure and habitats. Although we have a general understanding of how rivers evolve over longer timescales, the prediction of channel response to changes in boundary conditions on a more local scale and over shorter timescales remains a major challenge. To better predict morphological channel evolution, we need to test (i) how channels respond to perturbations in boundary conditions and (ii) how signalsTectonic and climatic boundary conditions determine the amount and the characteristics (size distribution and composition) of sediment that is generated and exported from mountain regions. On millennial timescales, rivers adjust their morphology such that the incoming sediment (Qs,in) can be transported downstream by the available water discharge (Qw). Changes in climatic and tectonic boundary conditions thus trigger an adjustment of the downstream river morphology. Understanding the sensitivity of river morphology to perturbations in boundary conditions is therefore of major importance, for example, for flood assessments, infrastructure and habitats. Although we have a general understanding of how rivers evolve over longer timescales, the prediction of channel response to changes in boundary conditions on a more local scale and over shorter timescales remains a major challenge. To better predict morphological channel evolution, we need to test (i) how channels respond to perturbations in boundary conditions and (ii) how signals reflecting the persisting conditions are preserved in sediment characteristics. This information can then be applied to reconstruct how local river systems have evolved over time. In this thesis, I address those questions by combining targeted field data collection in the Quebrada del Toro (Southern Central Andes of NW Argentina) with cosmogenic nuclide analysis and remote sensing data. In particular, I (1) investigate how information on hillslope processes is preserved in the 10Be concentration (geochemical composition) of fluvial sediments and how those signals are altered during downstream transport. I complement the field-based approach with physical experiments in the laboratory, in which I (2) explore how changes in sediment supply (Qs,in) or water discharge (Qw) generate distinct signals in the amount of sediment discharge at the basin outlet (Qs,out). With the same set of experiments, I (3) study the adjustments of alluvial channel morphology to changes in Qw and Qs,in, with a particular focus in fill-terrace formation. I transfer the findings from the experiments to the field to (4) reconstruct the evolution of a several-hundred meter thick fluvial fill-terrace sequence in the Quebrada del Toro. I create a detailed terrace chronology and perform reconstructions of paleo-Qs and Qw from the terrace deposits. In the following paragraphs, I summarize my findings on each of these four topics. First, I sampled detrital sediment at the outlet of tributaries and along the main stem in the Quebrada del Toro, analyzed their 10Be concentration ([10Be]) and compared the data to a detailed hillslope-process inventory. The often observed non-linear increase in catchment-mean denudation rate (inferred from [10Be] in fluvial sediment) with catchment-median slope, which has commonly been explained by an adjustment in landslide-frequency, coincided with a shift in the main type of hillslope processes. In addition, the [10Be] in fluvial sediments varied with grain-size. I defined the normalized sand-gravel-index (NSGI) as the 10Be-concentration difference between sand and gravel fractions divided by their summed concentrations. The NSGI increased with median catchment slope and coincided with a shift in the prevailing hillslope processes active in the catchments, thus making the NSGI a potential proxy for the evolution of hillslope processes over time from sedimentary deposits. However, the NSGI recorded hillslope-processes less well in regions of reduced hillslope-channel connectivity and, in addition, has the potential to be altered during downstream transport due to lateral sediment input, size-selective sediment transport and abrasion. Second, my physical experiments revealed that sediment discharge at the basin outlet (Qs,out) varied in response to changes in Qs,in or Qw. While changes in Qw caused a distinct signal in Qs,out during the transient adjustment phase of the channel to new boundary conditions, signals related to changes in Qs,in were buffered during the transient phase and likely only become apparent once the channel is adjusted to the new conditions. The temporal buffering is related to the negative feedback between Qs,in and channel-slope adjustments. In addition, I inferred from this result that signals extracted from the geochemical composition of sediments (e.g., [10Be]) are more likely to represent modern-day conditions during times of aggradation, whereas the signal will be temporally buffered due to mixing with older, remobilized sediment during times of channel incision. Third, the same set of experiments revealed that river incision, channel-width narrowing and terrace cutting were initiated by either an increase in Qw, a decrease in Qs,in or a drop in base level. The lag-time between the external perturbation and the terrace cutting determined (1) how well terrace surfaces preserved the channel profile prior to perturbation and (2) the degree of reworking of terrace-surface material. Short lag-times and well preserved profiles occurred in cases with a rapid onset of incision. Also, lag-times were synchronous along the entire channel after upstream perturbations (Qw, Qs,in), whereas base-level fall triggered an upstream migrating knickzone, such that lag-times increased with distance upstream. Terraces formed after upstream perturbations (Qw, Qs,in) were always steeper when compared to the active channel in new equilibrium conditions. In the base-level fall experiment, the slope of the terrace-surfaces and the modern channel were similar. Hence, slope comparisons between the terrace surface and the modern channel can give insights into the mechanism of terrace formation. Fourth, my detailed terrace-formation chronology indicated that cut-and-fill episodes in the Quebrada del Toro followed a ~100-kyr cyclicity, with the oldest terraces ~ 500 kyr old. The terraces were formed due to variability in upstream Qw and Qs. Reconstructions of paleo-Qs over the last 500 kyr, which were restricted to times of sediment deposition, indicated only minor (up to four-fold) variations in paleo-denudation rates. Reconstructions of paleo-Qw were limited to the times around the onset of river incision and revealed enhanced discharge from 10 to 85% compared to today. Such increases in Qw are in agreement with other quantitative paleo-hydrological reconstructions from the Eastern Andes, but have the advantage of dating further back in time.show moreshow less
  • Tektonische und klimatische Bedingungen bestimmen die Menge, Größenverteilung und Zusammensetzung von Sedimenten, welche in Gebirgsregionen produziert und von dort exportiert werden. Über Jahrtausende hinweg passen Flüsse ihre Morphologie an, um den Sedimenteintrag (Qs,in) mit dem verfügbaren Wasserabfluss (Qw) flussabwärts zu transportieren. Änderungen in den klimatischen oder tektonischen Randbedingungen lösen flussabwärts eine Anpassung der Flussmorphologie aus. Ein besseres Verständnis darüber, wie sensitiv Flüsse auf Perturbationen in den Randbedingungen reagieren, ist entscheidend, um beispielsweise Überflutungspotential besser abschätzen zu können. Obwohl wir generell ein gutes Verständnis für die Entwicklung von Flüssen auf langen Zeitskalen haben, können wir durch veränderte Randbedingungen ausgelöste Flussdynamiken lokal und auf kurzen Zeitskalen nur schwer vorhersagen. Um die Entwicklung der Flussmorphologie besser zu verstehen, beziehungsweise vorhersagen zu können, müssen wir testen, (1) wie Flüsse auf veränderteTektonische und klimatische Bedingungen bestimmen die Menge, Größenverteilung und Zusammensetzung von Sedimenten, welche in Gebirgsregionen produziert und von dort exportiert werden. Über Jahrtausende hinweg passen Flüsse ihre Morphologie an, um den Sedimenteintrag (Qs,in) mit dem verfügbaren Wasserabfluss (Qw) flussabwärts zu transportieren. Änderungen in den klimatischen oder tektonischen Randbedingungen lösen flussabwärts eine Anpassung der Flussmorphologie aus. Ein besseres Verständnis darüber, wie sensitiv Flüsse auf Perturbationen in den Randbedingungen reagieren, ist entscheidend, um beispielsweise Überflutungspotential besser abschätzen zu können. Obwohl wir generell ein gutes Verständnis für die Entwicklung von Flüssen auf langen Zeitskalen haben, können wir durch veränderte Randbedingungen ausgelöste Flussdynamiken lokal und auf kurzen Zeitskalen nur schwer vorhersagen. Um die Entwicklung der Flussmorphologie besser zu verstehen, beziehungsweise vorhersagen zu können, müssen wir testen, (1) wie Flüsse auf veränderte Randbedingungen reagieren und (2) wie Signale, welche die vorherschenden Bedingungen reflektieren, in Sedimenten konserviert werden. Diese Informationen können wir nutzen, um die Entwicklung von lokalen Flusssystemen zu rekonstruieren. In der vorliegenden Arbeit adressiere ich diese Fragen durch die Analyse von kosmogenen Nukleiden und Fernerkundungsdaten in der Quebrada del Toro (südliche Zentralanden in NW Argentinien). Insbesondere untersuche ich, wie (1) Informationen über Hangprozesse in der 10Be Konzentration (geochemische Zusammensetzung) von Flusssedimenten gespeichert werden und wie diese Signale durch den Transport flussabwärts überprägt werden. Ich ergänze diesen geländebasierten Ansatz mit physikalischen Experimenten im Labor, mit welchen ich untersuche, wie (2) Veränderungen in der Sedimentzufuhr (Qs,in) oder der Abflussmenge (Qw) eindeutige Signale in der Menge an Sedimentaustrag (Qs,out) am Beckenauslass generieren. Mit denselben Experimenten untersuche ich (3) die Anpassung der Flussmorphologie auf Veränderungen in Qw und Qs,in mit einem speziellen Fokus auf der Entstehung von Flussterrassen. Ich übertrage die Erkenntnisse von den Experimenten ins Gelände und (4) rekonstruiere die Entstehung von einer mehreren hundert Meter mächtigen Terrassensequenz in der Quebrada del Toro. Ich erstelle eine detaillierte Terrassenchronologie und führe mit Hilfe der Terrassenablagerungen Rekonstruktion von Qs und Qw für die Vergangenheit durch. In den folgenden Paragraphen fasse ich meine Ergebnisse zu den vier Forschungsschwerpunkten dieser Arbeit zusammen. Erstens habe ich Flusssedimente an den Mündungen von Nebenflüssen, sowie entlang des Hauptflusses in der Quebrada del Toro beprobt, die jeweilige 10Be Konzentration ([10Be]) bestimmt und die Daten mit einem detaillierten Hangprozess-Inventar verglichen. Der häufig beobachtete, nicht-lineare Anstieg der durchschnittlichen Denudationsrate des Einzugsgebietes (abgeleitet aus der [10Be] der Flusssedimente) mit der Hangneigung eines Einzugsgebietes fiel mit einer Verschiebung der wesentlichen, aktiven Hangprozesse zusammen. Zusätzlich variierte die [10Be] der Flusssedimente mit den Korngrößen. Ich habe den normalisierten Sand-Schotter-Index (NSGI) definiert, welcher sich aus der Differenz der [10Be] zwischen der Sand- und der Kiesfraktion, geteilt durch ihre summierte Konzentration, berechnet. Der NSGI stieg mit dem Median der Hangneigung eines Einzugsgebietes und fiel wiederum mit einer Verschiebung der vorherrschenden Hangprozesse im jeweiligen Einzugsgebiet zusammen. Diese Beobachtung qualifiziert den NSGI als einen potentiellen Proxy, um die Entwicklung von Hangprozessen über die Zeit aus Sedimentablagerungen zu rekonstruieren. Es ist jedoch einzuschränken, dass der NSGI durch den Transport flussabwärts auf Grund von temporärer Sedimentablagerung, lateraler Sedimentzufuhr, größenselektivem Sedimenttransport und Abrasion überprägt werden kann. Zweitens haben die Laborexperimente gezeigt, dass der Sedimentaustrag am Beckenauslass (Qs,out) auf Grund von Veränderungen in Qs,in oder Qw variiert. Während Veränderungen in Qw ein eindeutiges Signal in Qs,out während der transienten Anpassungsphase des Flusses an die neuen Randbedingungen hervorriefen, wurden durch Qs,in ausgelöste Signale während der transienten Anpassungsphase gepuffert. Sie werden vermutlich erst sichtbar, nachdem der Fluss sich an die neuen Randbedingungen angepasst hat. Das zeitliche Puffern ist mit der negativen Rückkopplung zwischen Qs,in und dem Flussgradienten zu erklären. Zusätzlich deuten die Ergebnisse darauf hin, dass sich Signale, welche in der geochemischen Zusammenstzung von Sediment gespeichert sind (z.B. [10Be]), in Phasen der Flussaufschotterung mit einer höheren Wahrscheinlichkeit die heutigen Bedingungen repräsentieren. Dagegen sind Signale in Zeiten der Flusseinschneidung aufgrund von Mischung mit älteren, remobilisierten Sedimenten gepuffert. Drittens haben dieselben Experimente gezeigt, dass Flusseinschneidung, Flussbettverengung sowie Terrassenbildung entweder durch eine Zunahme an Qw, eine Abnahme in Qs,in oder durch ein Absinken der Flussbasis initiiert werden konnte. Die Zeitverzögerung zwischen der Perturbation der Randbedingungen und der Terrassenformation bestimmt (1) wie gut Terrassenoberflächen das Flussprofil vom Zeitpunkt unmittelbar vor der Störung representieren und (2) den Grad an Umschichtung des Terrassenoberflächenmaterials. Kurze Verzögerungszeiten und gut erhaltende Profile konnten in Fällen eines schnellen Einsetzens der Flusseinschneidung beobachtet werden. Außerdem waren die Verzögerungszeiten entlang des Flusslaufes synchron im Falle einer Perturbation im Flussoberlauf (Qw, Qs,in), während ein Abfallen der Flussbasis einen flussaufwärts migrierenden Knickpunkt ausgelöst hat, sodass die Verzögerungszeiten in flussaufwärts Richtung zunahmen. Terrassen, welche durch Perturbationen im Flussoberlauf (Qw, Qs,in) gebildet wurden, waren steiler im Vergleich zum aktiven Fluss, nachdem dieser sich an die neuen Randbedingungen angepasst hat. In dem Experiment, bei welchem die Flussbasis abgesenkt wurde, waren die Neigung der Terrassenoberflächen und des aktiven Flussesbettes ähnlich. Daher können Vergleiche zwischen der Neigung der Terrassenoberflächen mit dem aktiven Flussbett auf den Mechanismus der Terrassenformation hinweisen. Viertens hat die detaillierte Terrassenchronologie gezeigt, dass die Einschneide-und-Ablagerungsepisoden in der Quebrada del Toro einem ~100 ka Zyklus folgen, beginnend mit der ersten Terrasse vor ca. 500 ka. Die Terrassen wurden durch Variabilität in Qw und Qs,in gebildet. Rekonstruktionen von Qs über die letzten 500 ka, beschränkt auf die Zeiten von Sedimentablagerung, zeigten eine eher geringe Variabilität (maximal vierfach) in Denudationsraten an. Rekonstruktionen des Abflusses waren beschränkt auf die Zeitpunkte um das Einsetzen der Flusseinschneidung herum und deuteten auf vermehrten Abfluss zwischen 10 und 85% im Vergleich zu heutigen Bedingungen hin. Vermehrter Abfluss in dieser Größenordnung stimmt mit anderen quantitativen Rekonstruktionen zur Hydrologie der Ost-Anden überein, diese Methode hat jedoch den Vorteil, dass sie zeitlich weiter zurück reicht.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Stefanie TofeldeORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-427168
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-42716
Subtitle (English):fluvial sediments as records of landscape evolution
Subtitle (German):wie Flusssedimente Landschaftsentwicklung aufzeichnen
Advisor:Taylor Schildgen
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2019/03/18
Release Date:2019/04/16
Tag:Flussterrassen; Gerinnemorphologie; Sedimenttransportsystem; Signalweiterleitung; Zentralanden
Cenral Andes; alluvial channel morphology; fluvial fill terraces; sediment-routing system; signal propagation
Pagenumber:XVII, 172
RVK - Regensburg Classification:TG 8050, TH 05200, UQ 6400
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Geowissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht