• search hit 36 of 558
Back to Result List

Understanding animal movement behaviour in dynamic agricultural landscapes

Tierbewegungen in dynamischen Agrarlandschaften

  • The movement of organisms has formed our planet like few other processes. Movements shape populations, communities, entire ecosystems, and guarantee fundamental ecosystem functions and services, like seed dispersal and pollination. Global, regional and local anthropogenic impacts influence animal movements across ecosystems all around the world. In particular, land-use modification, like habitat loss and fragmentation disrupt movements between habitats with profound consequences, from increased disease transmissions to reduced species richness and abundance. However, neither the influence of anthropogenic change on animal movement processes nor the resulting effects on ecosystems are well understood. Therefore, we need a coherent understanding of organismal movement processes and their underlying mechanisms to predict and prevent altered animal movements and their consequences for ecosystem functions. In this thesis I aim at understanding the influence of anthropogenically caused land-use change on animal movement processes andThe movement of organisms has formed our planet like few other processes. Movements shape populations, communities, entire ecosystems, and guarantee fundamental ecosystem functions and services, like seed dispersal and pollination. Global, regional and local anthropogenic impacts influence animal movements across ecosystems all around the world. In particular, land-use modification, like habitat loss and fragmentation disrupt movements between habitats with profound consequences, from increased disease transmissions to reduced species richness and abundance. However, neither the influence of anthropogenic change on animal movement processes nor the resulting effects on ecosystems are well understood. Therefore, we need a coherent understanding of organismal movement processes and their underlying mechanisms to predict and prevent altered animal movements and their consequences for ecosystem functions. In this thesis I aim at understanding the influence of anthropogenically caused land-use change on animal movement processes and their underlying mechanisms. In particular, I am interested in the synergistic influence of large-scale landscape structure and fine-scale habitat features on basic-level movement behaviours (e.g. the daily amount of time spend running, foraging, and resting) and their emerging higher-level movements (home range formation). Based on my findings, I identify the likely consequences of altered animal movements that lead to the loss of species richness and abundances. The study system of my thesis are hares in agricultural landscapes. European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) are perfectly suited to study animal movements in agricultural landscapes, as hares are hermerophiles and prefer open habitats. They have historically thrived in agricultural landscapes, but their numbers are in decline. Agricultural areas are undergoing strong land-use changes due to increasing food demand and fast developing agricultural technologies. They are already the largest land-use class, covering 38% of the world’s terrestrial surface. To consider the relevance of a given landscape structure for animal movement behaviour I selected two differently structured agricultural landscapes – a simple landscape in Northern Germany with large fields and few landscape elements (e.g. hedges and tree stands), and a complex landscape in Southern Germany with small fields and many landscape elements. I applied GPS devices (hourly fixes) with internal high-resolution accelerometers (4 min samples) to track hares, receiving an almost continuous observation of the animals’ behaviours via acceleration analyses. I used the spatial and behavioural information in combination with remote sensing data (normalized difference vegetation index, or NDVI, a proxy for resource availability), generating an almost complete idea of what the animal was doing when, why and where. Apart from landscape structure (represented by the two differently structured study areas), I specifically tested whether the following fine-scale habitat features influence animal movements: resource, agricultural management events, habitat diversity, and habitat structure. My results show that, irrespective of the movement process or mechanism and the type of fine-scale habitat features, landscape structure was the overarching variable influencing hare movement behaviour. High resource variability forces hares to enlarge their home ranges, but only in the simple and not in the complex landscape. Agricultural management events result in home range shifts in both landscapes, but force hares to increase their home ranges only in the simple landscape. Also the preference of habitat patches with low vegetation and the avoidance of high vegetation, was stronger in the simple landscape. High and dense crop fields restricted hare movements temporarily to very local and small habitat patch remnants. Such insuperable barriers can separate habitat patches that were previously connected by mobile links. Hence, the transport of nutrients and genetic material is temporarily disrupted. This mechanism is also working on a global scale, as human induced changes from habitat loss and fragmentation to expanding monocultures cause a reduction in animal movements worldwide. The mechanisms behind those findings show that higher-level movements, like increasing home ranges, emerge from underlying basic-level movements, like the behavioural modes. An increasing landscape simplicity first acts on the behavioural modes, i.e. hares run and forage more, but have less time to rest. Hence, the emergence of increased home range sizes in simple landscapes is based on an increased proportion of time running and foraging, largely due to longer travelling times between distant habitats and scarce resource items in the landscape. This relationship was especially strong during the reproductive phase, demonstrating the importance of high-quality habitat for reproduction and the need to keep up self-maintenance first, in low quality areas. These changes in movement behaviour may release a cascade of processes that start with more time being allocated to running and foraging, resulting into an increased energy expenditure and may lead to a decline in individual fitness. A decrease in individual fitness and reproductive output will ultimately affect population viability leading to local extinctions. In conclusion, I show that landscape structure has one of the most important effects on hare movement behaviour. Synergistic effects of landscape structure, and fine-scale habitat features, first affect and modify basic-level movement behaviours, that can scales up to altered higher-level movements and may even lead to the decline of species richness and abundances, and the disruption of ecosystem functions. Understanding the connection between movement mechanisms and processes can help to predict and prevent anthropogenically induced changes in movement behaviour. With regard to the paramount importance of landscape structure, I strongly recommend to decrease the size of agricultural fields and increase crop diversity. On the small-scale, conservation policies should assure the year round provision of areas with low vegetation height and high quality forage. This could be done by generating wildflower strips and additional (semi-) natural habitat patches. This will not only help to increase the populations of European brown hares and other farmland species, but also ensure and protects the continuity of mobile links and their intrinsic value for sustaining important ecosystem functions and services.show moreshow less
  • Wenige biologische Prozesse haben unseren Planeten so stark geformt wie die Bewegungen von Organismen. Individuelle Tierbewegungen haben weitreichende Auswirkungen auf ganze Populationen, Artengemeinschaften und Ökosysteme. Tier-bewegungen sind außerdem verantwortlich für fundamentale Ökosystemfunktionen und –leistungen, wie z.B. die Verbreitung von Samen und die Bestäubung von Wild- und Nutzpflanzen. Globale, regionale und lokale Einflüsse durch den Menschen verändern die ursprünglichen Bewegungsmuster von Organismen und damit auch die Auswir-kungen dieser Bewegungen auf die Ökosysteme. Insbesondere Landnutzungs-änderungen, wie z.B. der Verlust und die Fragmentierung von Lebensräumen, stören die Tierbewegungen zwischen verschiedenen Habitaten und können schwerwiegende Folgen nach sich ziehen. Diese Folgen reichen von der Verminderung der biologischen Artenvielfalt bis hin zu einer erhöhten Wahrscheinlichkeit der Krankheitsübertragung. Dennoch sind weder die Auswirkungen von Landnutzungsveränderungen auf die Bewegungsabläufe vonWenige biologische Prozesse haben unseren Planeten so stark geformt wie die Bewegungen von Organismen. Individuelle Tierbewegungen haben weitreichende Auswirkungen auf ganze Populationen, Artengemeinschaften und Ökosysteme. Tier-bewegungen sind außerdem verantwortlich für fundamentale Ökosystemfunktionen und –leistungen, wie z.B. die Verbreitung von Samen und die Bestäubung von Wild- und Nutzpflanzen. Globale, regionale und lokale Einflüsse durch den Menschen verändern die ursprünglichen Bewegungsmuster von Organismen und damit auch die Auswir-kungen dieser Bewegungen auf die Ökosysteme. Insbesondere Landnutzungs-änderungen, wie z.B. der Verlust und die Fragmentierung von Lebensräumen, stören die Tierbewegungen zwischen verschiedenen Habitaten und können schwerwiegende Folgen nach sich ziehen. Diese Folgen reichen von der Verminderung der biologischen Artenvielfalt bis hin zu einer erhöhten Wahrscheinlichkeit der Krankheitsübertragung. Dennoch sind weder die Auswirkungen von Landnutzungsveränderungen auf die Bewegungsabläufe von Tieren, noch deren Einfluss auf die Ökosysteme bis heute gut verstanden. Um die Veränderungen der Bewegungsprozesse und deren Folgen für die Funktionstüchtigkeit von Ökosystemen vorhersagen zu können oder gar zu verhindern, benötigen wir ein ganzheitliches Verständnis der organismischen Bewegungsprozesse. Das Ziel meiner Arbeit ist es, den Einfluss von anthropogenen Landnutzungs-änderungen auf tierische Bewegungsprozesse und die zugrundeliegende Mechanismen zu verstehen. Im Speziellen untersuche ich die synergetischen Effekte großflächiger Landschaftsstrukturen und kleinflächiger Habitatmerkmale auf das Bewegungsverhalten von Tieren. Dabei untersuche ich sowohl die Bewegungsprozesse, wie z.B. die Ent-stehung von Streifgebieten, als auch die zugrundeliegenden täglichen Verhaltensweisen wie das Laufen, die Nahrungssuche und das Schlafen. Die hierbei gewonnen Erkennt-nisse ermöglichen es mir, die voraussichtlichen Folgen von veränderten Tierbewe-gungen auf Ökosysteme abzuleiten. Das Modelsystem meiner Doktorarbeit ist der Feldhase (Lepus europaeus) in Agrarlandschaften. Feldhasen eignen sich hervorragend zur Untersuchung von Tier-bewegungen in landwirtschaftlich genutzten Gebieten, da sie Kulturfolger sind und offene Lebensräume, wie Agrarlandschaften und Steppen bevorzugen. Sie konnten sich in landwirtschaftlichen Regionen ausbreiten und entfalten. Jedoch sind die Bestände seit den 1960er Jahren stark zurückgegangen. Die Intensivierung der Landwirtschaft stellt einen Grund für diesen Rückgang dar. Aufgrund des steigenden Nahrungsmittelbedarfs und der sich schnell entwickelnden Agrartechnologien unterliegen Agrarlandschaften starken Landnutzungsänderungen. Agrarlandschaften stellen weltweit das flächenmäßig größte Landnutzungssystem dar und bedecken 38% der Erdoberfläche. Um die Auswirkungen großflächiger Landschaftsstrukturen auf das Bewegungsverhalten von Tieren zu untersuchen, habe ich zwei unterschiedlich strukturierte Agrarlandschaften ausgewählt: eine relativ einfach strukturierte Landschaft in Norddeutschland, die sich v.a. durch große Feldern und wenige Landschaftselementen (z.B. Hecken und kleinere Baumbestände) auszeichnet und eine komplexere Landschaft in Süddeutschland, die durch kleinere Felder und vielen dieser Landschaftselementen charakterisiert ist. Mit Hilfe von GPS-Halsbändern, die mit internen hochauflösenden Beschleu-nigungssensoren ausgestattet sind, wurden die Bewegungen der Feldhasen aufge-zeichnet. Die Beschleunigungssensoren liefern nahezu kontinuierliche Daten, die mit Hilfe von statistischen Klassifikationsverfahren das Verhalten der Tiere wiedergeben können. Die räumlichen Daten (GPS) und die Informationen über die Verhaltensweisen wurden anschließend mit Fernerkundungsdaten kombiniert, die wiederum Aufschluss über die Ressourcenverfügbarkeit geben. Hierdurch kann ein fast vollständiges Bild davon generiert werden, was das Tier wann, warum und wo getan hat. Neben der Landschaftsstruktur (dargestellt durch die beiden unterschiedlich strukturierten Unter-suchungsgebiete) habe ich getestet, ob die folgenden kleinflächigen Habitatmerkmale einen Einfluss auf die Tierbewegungen ausüben: raum-zeitliche Variabilität in der Ressourcenverfügbarkeit, landwirtschaftliche Managementmaßnahmen, Habitatdiversität und Habitatstruktur. Die Ergebnisse meiner Forschungsarbeit zeigen, dass unabhängig vom Bewegungsprozess oder -mechanismus und der Art der Habitatmerkmale, die Land-schaftsstruktur die Bewegungen der Feldhasen am stärksten beeinflusst. Eine hohe Ressourcenvariabilität zwingt die Feldhasen dazu, ihre Streifgebiete zu vergrößern, jedoch nur in der einfachen und nicht in der komplexen Landschaft. Landwirtschaftliche Managementmaßnahmen führen zu einer Verschiebung der Streifgebiete in beiden Landschaftstypen. In der einfachen Landschaft jedoch, vergrößern die Feldhasen zusätzlich ihre Streifgebiete. Feldhasen bevorzugen niedrige und vermeiden hohe Vegetation. Im Vergleich zur komplexen Landschaft ist diese Art der Habitatselektion stärker in der einfachen Landschaft ausgeprägt. Hohe und dichte Feldfrüchte, wie z.B. Raps oder Weizen, beschränken die Bewegungen der Feldhasen vorübergehend auf viel kleinere und lokale Gebiete. Derartige unüberwindbare Barrieren können Habitate voneinander trennen, die vorher durch sogenannte „mobile links“ miteinander verbunden waren. „Mobile links“ transportieren z.B. Nährstoffe oder genetisches Material zwischen entfernten Habitaten. Durch die Trennung wird dieser Transport vorübergehend unterbrochen und stört somit die Funktionstüchtigkeit des Ökosystems. Die Reduktion von „mobile links“ durch die vom Menschen verursachten Landnutzungsänderungen und damit einhergehenden Einschränkungen von Tierbewegungen ist weltweit vorzufinden. Die Resultate meiner Untersuchungen zeigen zudem, dass Bewegungsprozesse, wie z.B. die Vergrößerung der Streifgebiete, durch die zugrundeliegenden Verhaltens-weisen ausgelöst werden. Eine zunehmende Vereinfachung von Landschaftsstrukturen wirkt sich zunächst auf die Verhaltensweisen aus, d.h. Feldhasen laufen mehr und begeben sich häufiger auf die Suche nach Nahrung und anderen Ressourcen. Demnach verringern sich die Ruhezeiten der Feldhasen. Die Vergrößerung von Streifgebieten in der einfach strukturierten Landschaft beruht daher auf einem erhöhten Anteil an Lauf- und Nahrungssuchzeiten. Dies ist vor allem auf die längeren Wege zwischen den weiter entfernten Habitaten und eine geringere Ressourcenverfügbarkeit in einfach strukturierten Landschaften zurück zu führen. In meinen Untersuchungen zeige ich außerdem, dass die Beziehung zwischen der Landschaftsstruktur und den Verhaltens-weisen während der Fortpflanzungsphase besonders stark ausgeprägt ist. Dies zeigt zum einen die besondere Bedeutung eines qualitativ hochwertigen Lebensraums während der Fortpflanzungsphase und zum anderen, dass sich Tiere in Gebieten mit geringer Habitatqualität erst um das eigene tägliche Überleben kümmern müssen. Erst wenn ausreichend Zeit und Ressourcen verfügbar sind, können die Feldhasen sich erfolgreich fortpflanzen. Veränderungen im Bewegungsverhalten können also eine ganze Kaskade von Prozessen auslösen. Diese Kaskade beginnen mit der Veränderung der Verhaltensweisen durch z.B. weniger strukturierte Habitate und führt zu einem erhöhten Anteil an Laufen und Futtersuche, was wiederum einen erhöhten Energieaufwand bedeutet. Wenn Tiere zu viel Energie aufwenden müssen, um das eigene tägliche Überleben zu sichern, kann dies einen Rückgang ihrer individuellen Fitness bedeuten. Die Abnahme der Fitness und der Reproduktionsleistung wird sich letztendlich auf die Überlebensfähigkeit der Population auswirken und kann zum lokalen Aussterben führen. Die Struktur der Agrarlandschaft stellt eine der wichtigsten Einflussgrößen für das Bewegungsverhalten von Feldhasen dar. Die synergistischen Effekte der großflächigen Landschaftsstruktur und der kleinflächigen Habitatmerkmale beeinflussen und modifizieren zunächst die täglichen Verhaltensweisen, die dann wiederum zu veränderten Bewegungsprozessen führen und damit zu Störungen der Ökosystem-funktionen und zum Rückgang der biologischen Vielfalt beitragen. Im Hinblick auf die große Bedeutung der Landschaftsstruktur empfehle ich daher dringend die Größe der landwirtschaftlichen Felder zu verringern und die Vielfalt der Anbaukulturen zu erhöhen. Kleinräumige Naturerhaltungsmaßnahmen sollten die ganzjährige Bereitstellung von Habitaten mit geringer Vegetationshöhe und hochwertigem Futter sicherstellen. Dies kann durch den Anbau von Blühstreifen und der Schaffung bzw. dem Erhalt zusätzlicher (halb-)natürlicher Lebensräume erreicht werden. Diese Maßnahmen werden nicht nur dazu beitragen, die Populationen der Feldhasen und anderer Kulturfolgern zu vergrößern, sondern helfen auch dabei das Fortbestehen der „mobile links“ und der damit verbundenen Ökosystemfunktionen und –leistungen zu gewährleisten und zu schützen.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Wiebke UllmannORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-427153
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-42715
Referee:Niels BlaumORCiDGND, Christina FischerORCiDGND, Niko BalkenholORCiDGND
Advisor:Niels Blaum
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2019/03/12
Release Date:2019/04/30
Tag:Agrarlandschaft; Bewegungsökologie; Feldhase; GPS; Telemetrie
European hare; GPS; agricultural landscapes; movemen ecology; telemetry
Pagenumber:vii, 183
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 57 Biowissenschaften; Biologie / 570 Biowissenschaften; Biologie
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht