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Reconstructed late Quaternary hydrological changes from Lake Tso Moriri, NW Himalaya

  • We present the results of our investigations on the radiocarbon dated core sediments from the Lake Tso Moriri, NW Himalaya aimed at reconstructing palaeohydrological changes in this climatically sensitive region. Based on the detailed geochemical, mineralogical and sedimentological analysis, we recognise several short-term fluctuations superimposed upon seven major palaeohydrological stages identified in this lake since similar to 26 cal ka. Stage I (>20.2 cal ka): shallow lake characterised by input of coarse-grained detrital sediments; Stage II (20.2-16.4 cal ka): lake deepening and intensification of this trend ca. 18 cal ka; Stage III (16.4-11.2 cal ka): rising lake levels with a short term wet phase (13.1-11.7 cal ka); Stage IV (11.2-8.5 cal ka): early Holocene hydrological maxima and highest lake levels inferred to have resulted from early Holocene Indian monsoon intensification, as records from central Asia indicate weaker westerlies during this interval; Stage V (8.5-5.5 cal ka): mid-Holocene climate deterioration; Stage VIWe present the results of our investigations on the radiocarbon dated core sediments from the Lake Tso Moriri, NW Himalaya aimed at reconstructing palaeohydrological changes in this climatically sensitive region. Based on the detailed geochemical, mineralogical and sedimentological analysis, we recognise several short-term fluctuations superimposed upon seven major palaeohydrological stages identified in this lake since similar to 26 cal ka. Stage I (>20.2 cal ka): shallow lake characterised by input of coarse-grained detrital sediments; Stage II (20.2-16.4 cal ka): lake deepening and intensification of this trend ca. 18 cal ka; Stage III (16.4-11.2 cal ka): rising lake levels with a short term wet phase (13.1-11.7 cal ka); Stage IV (11.2-8.5 cal ka): early Holocene hydrological maxima and highest lake levels inferred to have resulted from early Holocene Indian monsoon intensification, as records from central Asia indicate weaker westerlies during this interval; Stage V (8.5-5.5 cal ka): mid-Holocene climate deterioration; Stage VI (5.5-2.7 cal ka): progressive lowering of lake level; Stage VII (2.7-0 cal ka): onset of modern conditions. The reconstructed hydrological variability in Lake Tso Moriri is governed by temperature changes (meltwater inflow) and monsoon precipitation (increased runoff). A regional comparison shows considerable differences with other palaeorecords from peninsular India during late Holocene. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA. All rights reserved.show moreshow less

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Author:Praveen K. Mishra, Ambili Anoop, Georg Schettler, Sushma Prasad, Arshid Jehangir, Peter Menzel, Rudolf Naumann, A. R. Yousuf, Nathani Basavaiah, Kannan Deenadayalan, Martin G. Wiesner, Birgit Gaye
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2014.11.040
ISSN:1040-6182 (print)
ISSN:1873-4553 (online)
Parent Title (English):Quaternary international : the journal of the International Union for Quaternary Research
Publisher:Elsevier
Place of publication:Oxford
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2015
Year of Completion:2015
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Authigenic carbonates; Holocene; Indian summer monsoon; Lake sediments; Tso Moriri Lake; Westerlies
Volume:371
Pagenumber:11
First Page:76
Last Page:86
Funder:Deutsche ForschungsGemeinschaft under the coordinated programm "Himalaya: Modern and Past Climates" (HIMPAC) [PR 1163/2-1, PR 1163/3-1, PR 1163/4-1, GA 755/7-1, FOR 1380]; Deutsches GFZ Potsdam; Kashmir University; Indian Institute of Geomagnetism
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Peer Review:Referiert