• search hit 1 of 1
Back to Result List

Understanding Himalayan denudation at the catchment and orogen scale

Verständnis von Denudation auf regionalem und orogenem Maßstab im Himalaja

  • Understanding the rates and processes of denudation is key to unraveling the dynamic processes that shape active orogens. This includes decoding the roles of tectonic and climate-driven processes in the long-term evolution of high- mountain landscapes in regions with pronounced tectonic activity and steep climatic and surface-process gradients. Well-constrained denudation rates can be used to address a wide range of geologic problems. In steady-state landscapes, denudation rates are argued to be proportional to tectonic or isostatic uplift rates and provide valuable insight into the tectonic regimes underlying surface denudation. The use of denudation rates based on terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) such as 10Beryllium has become a widely-used method to quantify catchment-mean denudation rates. Because such measurements are averaged over timescales of 102 to 105 years, they are not as susceptible to stochastic changes as shorter-term denudation rate estimates (e.g., from suspended sediment measurements) and are therefore consideredUnderstanding the rates and processes of denudation is key to unraveling the dynamic processes that shape active orogens. This includes decoding the roles of tectonic and climate-driven processes in the long-term evolution of high- mountain landscapes in regions with pronounced tectonic activity and steep climatic and surface-process gradients. Well-constrained denudation rates can be used to address a wide range of geologic problems. In steady-state landscapes, denudation rates are argued to be proportional to tectonic or isostatic uplift rates and provide valuable insight into the tectonic regimes underlying surface denudation. The use of denudation rates based on terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) such as 10Beryllium has become a widely-used method to quantify catchment-mean denudation rates. Because such measurements are averaged over timescales of 102 to 105 years, they are not as susceptible to stochastic changes as shorter-term denudation rate estimates (e.g., from suspended sediment measurements) and are therefore considered more reliable for a comparison to long-term processes that operate on geologic timescales. However, the impact of various climatic, biotic, and surface processes on 10Be concentrations and the resultant denudation rates remains unclear and is subject to ongoing discussion. In this thesis, I explore the interaction of climate, the biosphere, topography, and geology in forcing and modulating denudation rates on catchment to orogen scales. There are many processes in highly dynamic active orogens that may effect 10Be concentrations in modern river sands and therefore impact 10Be-derived denudation rates. The calculation of denudation rates from 10Be concentrations, however, requires a suite of simplifying assumptions that may not be valid or applicable in many orogens. I investigate how these processes affect 10Be concentrations in the Arun Valley of Eastern Nepal using 34 new 10Be measurements from the main stem Arun River and its tributaries. The Arun Valley is characterized by steep gradients in climate and topography, with elevations ranging from <100 m asl in the foreland basin to >8,000 asl in the high sectors to the north. This is coupled with a five-fold increase in mean annual rainfall across strike of the orogen. Denudation rates from tributary samples increase toward the core of the orogen, from <0.2 to >5 mm/yr from the Lesser to Higher Himalaya. Very high denudation rates (>2 mm/yr), however, are likely the result of 10Be TCN dilution by surface and climatic processes, such as large landsliding and glaciation, and thus may not be representative of long-term denudation rates. Mainstem Arun denudation rates increase downstream from ~0.2 mm/yr at the border with Tibet to 0.91 mm/yr at its outlet into the Sapt Kosi. However, the downstream 10Be concentrations may not be representative of the entire upstream catchment. Instead, I document evidence for downstream fining of grains from the Tibetan Plateau, resulting in an order-of-magnitude apparent decrease in the measured 10Be concentration. In the Arun Valley and across the Himalaya, topography, climate, and vegetation are strongly interrelated. The observed increase in denudation rates at the transition from the Lesser to Higher Himalaya corresponds to abrupt increases in elevation, hillslope gradient, and mean annual rainfall. Thus, across strike (N-S), it is difficult to decipher the potential impacts of climate and vegetation cover on denudation rates. To further evaluate these relationships I instead took advantage of an along-strike west-to-east increase of mean annual rainfall and vegetation density in the Himalaya. An analysis of 136 published 10Be denudation rates from along strike of the revealed that median denudation rates do not vary considerably along strike of the Himalaya, ~1500 km E-W. However, the range of denudation rates generally decreases from west to east, with more variable denudation rates in the northwestern regions of the orogen than in the eastern regions. This denudation rate variability decreases as vegetation density increases (R=- 0.90), and increases proportionately to the annual seasonality of vegetation (R=0.99). Moreover, rainfall and vegetation modulate the relationship between topographic steepness and denudation rates such that in the wet, densely vegetated regions of the Himalaya, topography responds more linearly to changes in denudation rates than in dry, sparsely vegetated regions, where the response of topographic steepness to denudation rates is highly nonlinear. Understanding the relationships between denudation rates, topography, and climate is also critical for interpreting sedimentary archives. However, there is a lack of understanding of how terrestrial organic matter is transported out of orogens and into sedimentary archives. Plant wax lipid biomarkers derived from terrestrial and marine sedimentary records are commonly used as paleo- hydrologic proxy to help elucidate these problems. I address the issue of how to interpret the biomarker record by using the plant wax isotopic composition of modern suspended and riverbank organic matter to identify and quantify organic matter source regions in the Arun Valley. Topographic and geomorphic analysis, provided by the 10Be catchment-mean denudation rates, reveals that a combination of topographic steepness (as a proxy for denudation) and vegetation density is required to capture organic matter sourcing in the Arun River. My studies highlight the importance of a rigorous and careful interpretation of denudation rates in tectonically active orogens that are furthermore characterized by strong climatic and biotic gradients. Unambiguous information about these issues is critical for correctly decoding and interpreting the possible tectonic and climatic forces that drive erosion and denudation, and the manifestation of the erosion products in sedimentary archives.show moreshow less
  • Schlüssel im Verständnis der dynamischen Prozesse in aktiven Orogenen ist die Kenntnis der Abtragungsraten und -prozesse. Eine breite Auswahl geologischer Fragen können mit well-constrained Abtragungsraten erörtert werden. Sind Landschaften im Gleichgewicht so sind die Denudationsraten proportional zu den tektonischen und isostatischen Hebungsraten und geben somit wichtige Hinweise über die tektonischen Eigenschaften der Region. Eine weit verbreitete und etablierte Methode zur Bestimmung mittlerer Denudationsraten eines bestimmten Einzugsgebietes ist Beryllium-10, ein terrestrisches kosmogenes Nuklid (10Be TCN). 10Be TCN Messungen stellen durchschnittliche Abtragungsraten über einen Zeitraum von 10^2 – 10^5 Jahren dar und sind daher weniger verletzlich gegenüber stochastischen Änderungen wie Erosionsraten, die über einen kurzen Zeitraum ermittelt werden z.B. in Suspension. Sie sind daher zuverlässig einsetzbar um langfristige Prozesse zu vergleichen. Allerdings ist unklar welche Einfluss verschiedene klimatische, biologische oderSchlüssel im Verständnis der dynamischen Prozesse in aktiven Orogenen ist die Kenntnis der Abtragungsraten und -prozesse. Eine breite Auswahl geologischer Fragen können mit well-constrained Abtragungsraten erörtert werden. Sind Landschaften im Gleichgewicht so sind die Denudationsraten proportional zu den tektonischen und isostatischen Hebungsraten und geben somit wichtige Hinweise über die tektonischen Eigenschaften der Region. Eine weit verbreitete und etablierte Methode zur Bestimmung mittlerer Denudationsraten eines bestimmten Einzugsgebietes ist Beryllium-10, ein terrestrisches kosmogenes Nuklid (10Be TCN). 10Be TCN Messungen stellen durchschnittliche Abtragungsraten über einen Zeitraum von 10^2 – 10^5 Jahren dar und sind daher weniger verletzlich gegenüber stochastischen Änderungen wie Erosionsraten, die über einen kurzen Zeitraum ermittelt werden z.B. in Suspension. Sie sind daher zuverlässig einsetzbar um langfristige Prozesse zu vergleichen. Allerdings ist unklar welche Einfluss verschiedene klimatische, biologische oder erdoberflächen Prozesse auf die 10Be Konzentration ausüben und somit auch auf die resultierenden Abtragungsraten. In dieser Doktorarbeit, setze ich mich mit dem Zwischenspiel von Klima, Biosphäre, Topographie und Geologie auseinander und dem Einfluss, den sie auf Abtragungsraten ausüben sowohl auf regionalem wie auch auf orogenem Maßstab. In hoch dynamischen aktiven Gebirgen gibt es viele Prozesse, welche die 10Be Konzentration in heutigen Flusssanden beeinflussen und damit auch die, mittels 10Be berechneten, Abtragungsraten. Um diese Raten mittels 10Be Konzentrationen zu berechnen benötigen wir einige vereinfachende Annahmen, die möglicherweise in anderen Regionen keine Gültigkeit haben. Ich untersuche den Einfluss dieser Prozesse auf die 10Be Konzentration. Dazu haben wir im Arun Tal im Osten Nepals 34 neue 10Be Konzentrationen des Arun Flusses und seinen Zuflüssen untersucht. Charakteristisch für das Arun Tal sind die steilen Gradienten im Klima mit einem fünffachen Anstieg des mittleren jährlichen Regenfalls über das Orogens, und in der Topographie mit Höhen von weniger als 100 m über Meer im Vorlandbecken bis über 8000 m über Meer im Gebirge. Die Abtragungsraten der Proben der Zuflüsse nehmen gegen das Zentrum des Gebirges von weniger <0.2 zu mehr als >5 mm/yr zu d.h. ansteigend vom Lesser zum Higher Himalaya. Sehr hohe Denudationsraten (> 2mm/yr) können durch erdoberflächen und klimatische Prozesse verwässert werden z. B. grosse Erdrutsche und Vergletscherungen, und sind daher nicht unbedingt repräsentativ für langzeitliche Abtragungsraten. Im Arun nehmen die Raten des Hauptflusses flussabwärts von 0.2 mm/yr im Bereich der Grenze zu Tibet auf 0.91 mm/yr am Ausfluss in Sapt Kosi zu. Es ist möglich, dass diese 10Be Konzentrationen nicht das vollständige flussauswärtsliegende Einzugsgebiet repräsentieren. Stattdessen lege ich dar wie sich die Korngrösse ab dem tibetischen Plateau verfeinert und dazu führt, dass die 10Be Konzentrationen offenkundig im Bereich einer Grössenordnung abnehmen. Im Arun Tal und sowie über den ganzen Himalaja sind Topographie, Klima und Vegetation sehr stark miteinander verbunden. Das Ansteigen der Denudationsraten im Übergang vom Lesser zum Higher Himalaya stimmt mit dem abrupten Ansteigen der Höhe, des Hangneigungsgradienten und des mittleren jährlichen Regenfalles überein. Es ist schwierig die möglichen Einflüssen von Klima und der Vegetationsdichte auf die Abtragungsraten über das Orogen hinweg (N-S) zu entziffern. Stattdessen, nutzen wir den Vorteil der, von West nach Ost, parallel zum Himalaja verlaufenden, Zunahme des mittleren jährlichen Regenfalles und der Vegetationsdichte. Eine Analyse 136 publizierter 10Be TCN Abtragungsraten entlang des Gebirges, zeigt dass die im Streichen liegenden mittleren Denudationsraten (ca. 1500 km Ost-West) nicht deutlich variieren. Generell sinkt die Wertebereich der Denudationsraten vom Westen gegen Osten, wobei in den nordwestlichen Regionen des Himalajas variablere Abtragungsraten vorherrschen als in den östlichen Regionen. Diese Vielfalt in den Denudationsraten sinkt mit steigender Vegetationsdichte (R=-0.90) und steigt proportional zur (jährlichen) Saisonalität der Vegetation (R=0.99). Vielmehr noch wird das Verhältnis zwischen der topographischen Steilheit und den Abtragungsraten durch Regen und Vegetation beeinflusst z. B. in feuchten Gebieten mit starker Vegetation reagiert die Topographie linearer auf Wechsel in den Abtragungsraten als in trockenen, kaum bewachsenen Regionen, wo die Reaktion der topographischen Steilheit auf die Denudationsraten äusserst nicht-linear ist. Das Verständnis der Beziehung zwischen Erosion, Topographie und Klima ist auch entscheidend für die Interpretation von Sedimentarchiven. Unser Wissen über die Repräsentativität von terrestrisches organisches Material, abgelagert in z.B. Flussdeltas, für die Einzugsgebiete der entsprechenden Flüsse, ist nach wie vor nur vage. Dennoch sind Blattwachse höherer Landpflanzen, extrahiert aus terrestrischen und marinen Sedimenten, ein häufig verwendeter paläohydrologischer Proxy. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit nutzen wir die Isotopenzusammensetzung von Pflanzenwachsen aus Suspensionsmaterial und aus Flusssedimenten als Herkunftsmarker und zur Quantifizierung des organischen Materials im Arun Tal. Die Analyse von Vegetationsdichte und Regenverteilung in Kombination mit Abtragungsraten des Einzugsgebietes, welche durch die mittleren 10Be-Erosionsraten gestützt werden, zeigen, dass das Vorhandensein dichter Vegetation ein zwar notwendiges, aber nicht hinreichendes Kriterium für hohen OM-Export ist. Vielmehr können wir zeigen, dass nur eine Kombination aus dichter Vegetationsdecke und Erosion zu hohem OM-Export führt. Für die Interpretation entspechender Archive bedeutet das, dass sie im Wesentlichen jene Bereiche des Einzugsgebietes repräsentieren, welche durch hohe Pflanzendichte und starke Erosion charakterisiert sind. Diese Studien belegen wie wichtig es ist die Abtragungsraten in aktiven Gebirgen umfassend zu verstehen. Für die Interpretation kann dieses Verständnis der möglichen tektonischen und klimatischen Gewalten, welche Erosion und Abtragung steuern, und auch das Verständnis der Sedimentarchive aus den Gebirgen stammend, entscheidend sein.show moreshow less

Download full text files

  • SHA-1:6043129400d1e102ec6caf70761c80a99b2e745c

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Stephanie Olen
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-91423
Advisor:Manfred R. Strecker
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2016
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2016/05/02
Release Date:2016/09/15
Tag:Geologie; Geomorphologie; Himalaja
Himalaya; geology; geomorphology
Pagenumber:xx, 174
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Geowissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht