• search hit 1 of 1
Back to Result List

Tectonic and climatic control on the evolution of the Himalayan mountain front

Tektonische und klimatische Kontrolle über die Entwicklung der Himalaya-Gebirgsfront

  • Variations in the distribution of mass within an orogen may lead to transient sediment storage, which in turn might affect the state of stress and the level of fault activity. Distinguishing between different forcing mechanisms causing variations of sediment flux and tectonic activity, is therefore one of the most challenging tasks in understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of active mountain belts. The Himalayan mountain belt is one of the most significant Cenozoic collisional mountain belt, formed due to collision between northward-bound Indian Plate and the Eurasian Plate during the last 55-50 Ma. Ongoing convergence of these two tectonic plates is accommodated by faulting and folding within the Himalayan arc-shaped orogen and the continued lateral and vertical growth of the Tibetan Plateau and mountain belts adjacent to the plateau as well as regions farther north. Growth of the Himalayan orogen is manifested by the development of successive south-vergent thrust systems. These thrust systems divide the orogen into differentVariations in the distribution of mass within an orogen may lead to transient sediment storage, which in turn might affect the state of stress and the level of fault activity. Distinguishing between different forcing mechanisms causing variations of sediment flux and tectonic activity, is therefore one of the most challenging tasks in understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of active mountain belts. The Himalayan mountain belt is one of the most significant Cenozoic collisional mountain belt, formed due to collision between northward-bound Indian Plate and the Eurasian Plate during the last 55-50 Ma. Ongoing convergence of these two tectonic plates is accommodated by faulting and folding within the Himalayan arc-shaped orogen and the continued lateral and vertical growth of the Tibetan Plateau and mountain belts adjacent to the plateau as well as regions farther north. Growth of the Himalayan orogen is manifested by the development of successive south-vergent thrust systems. These thrust systems divide the orogen into different morphotectonic domains. From north to south these thrusts are the Main Central Thrust (MCT), the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) and the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT). The growing topography interacts with moisture-bearing monsoonal winds, which results in pronounced gradients in rainfall, weathering, erosion and sediment transport toward the foreland and beyond. However, a fraction of this sediment is trapped and transiently stored within the intermontane valleys or ‘dun’s within the lower-elevation foothills of the range. Improved understanding of the spatiotemporal evolution of these sediment archives could provide a unique opportunity to decipher the triggers of variations in sediment production, delivery and storage in an actively deforming mountain belt and support efforts to test linkages between sediment volumes in intermontane basins and changes in the shallow crustal stress field. As sediment redistribution in mountain belts on timescales of 102-104 years can effect cultural characteristics and infrastructure in the intermontane valleys and may even impact the seismotectonics of a mountain belt, there is a heightened interest in understanding sediment-routing processes and causal relationships between tectonism, climate and topography. It is here at the intersection between tectonic processes and superposed climatic and sedimentary processes in the Himalayan orogenic wedge, where my investigation is focused on. The study area is the intermontane Kangra Basin in the northwestern Sub-Himalaya, because the characteristics of the different Himalayan morphotectonic provinces are well developed, the area is part of a region strongly influenced by monsoonal forcing, and the existence of numerous fluvial terraces provides excellent strain markers to assess deformation processes within the Himalayan orogenic wedge. In addition, being located in front of the Dhauladhar Range the region is characterized by pronounced gradients in past and present-day erosion and sediment processes associated with repeatedly changing climatic conditions. In light of these conditions I analysed climate-driven late Pleistocene-Holocene sediment cycles in this tectonically active region, which may be responsible for triggering the tectonic re-organization within the Himalayan orogenic wedge, leading to out-of-sequence thrusting, at least since early Holocene. The Kangra Basin is bounded by the MBT and the Sub-Himalayan Jwalamukhi Thrust (JMT) in the north and south, respectively and transiently stores sediments derived from the Dhauladhar Range. The Basin contains ~200-m-thick conglomerates reflecting two distinct aggradation phases; following aggradation, several fluvial terraces were sculpted into these fan deposits. 10Be CRN surface exposure dating of these terrace levels provides an age of 53.4±3.2 ka for the highest-preserved terrace (AF1); subsequently, this surface was incised until ~15 ka, when the second fan (AF2) began to form. AF2 fan aggradation was superseded by episodic Holocene incision, creating at least four terrace levels. We find a correlation between variations in sediment transport and ∂18O records from regions affected by the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). During strengthened ISMs sand post-LGM glacial retreat, aggradation occurred in the Kangra Basin, likely due to high sediment flux, whereas periods of a weakened ISM coupled with lower sediment supply coincided with renewed re-incision. However, the evolution of fluvial terraces along Sub-Himalayan streams in the Kangra sector is also forced by tectonic processes. Back-tilted, folded terraces clearly document tectonic activity of the JMT. Offset of one of the terrace levels indicates a shortening rate of 5.6±0.8 to 7.5±1.0 mm.a-1 over the last ~10 ka. Importantly, my study reveals that late Pleistocene/Holocene out-of-sequence thrusting accommodates 40-60% of the total 14±2 mm.a-1 shortening partitioned throughout the Sub-Himalaya. Importantly, the JMT records shortening at a lower rate over longer timescales hints towards out-of-sequence activity within the Sub-Himalaya. Re-activation of the JMT could be related to changes in the tectonic stress field caused by large-scale sediment removal from the basin. I speculate that the deformation processes of the Sub-Himalaya behave according to the predictions of critical wedge model and assume the following: While >200m of sediment aggradation would trigger foreland-ward propagation of the deformation front, re-incision and removal of most of the stored sediments (nearly 80-85% of the optimum basin-fill) would again create a sub-critical condition of the wedge taper and trigger the retreat of the deformation front. While tectonism is responsible for the longer-term processes of erosion associated with steepening hillslopes, sediment cycles in this environment are mainly the result of climatic forcing. My new 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure dates and a synopsis of previous studies show the late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial fills and fluvial terraces studied here record periodic fluctuations of sediment supply and transport capacity on timescales of 1000-100000 years. To further evaluate the potential influence of climate change on these fluctuations, I compared the timing of aggradation and incision phases recorded within remnant alluvial fans and terraces with continental climate archives such as speleothems in neighboring regions affected by monsoonal precipitation. Together with previously published OSL ages yielding the timing of aggradation, I find a correlation between variations in sediment transport with oxygen-isotope records from regions affected by the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). Accordingly, during periods of increased monsoon intensity (transitions from dry and cold to wet and warm periods – MIS4 to MIS3 and MIS2 to MIS1) (MIS=marine isotope stage) and post-Last Glacial Maximum glacial retreat, aggradation occurred in the Kangra Basin, likely due to high sediment flux. Conversely, periods of weakened monsoon intensity or lower sediment supply coincide with re-incision of the existing basin-fill. Finally, my study entails part of a low-temperature thermochronology study to assess the youngest exhumation history of the Dhauladhar Range. Zircon helium (ZHe) ages and existing low-temperature data sets (ZHe, apatite fission track (AFT)) across this range, together with 3D thermokinematic modeling (PECUBE) reveals constraints on exhumation and activity of the range-bounding Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) since at least mid-Miocene time. The modeling results indicate mean slip rates on the MBT-fault ramp of ~2 – 3 mm.a-1 since its activation. This has lead to the growth of the >5-km-high frontal Dhauladhar Range and continuous deep-seated exhumation and erosion. The obtained results also provide interesting constraints of deformation patterns and their variation along strike. The results point towards the absence of the time-transient ‘mid-crustal ramp’ in the basal decollement and duplexing of the Lesser Himalayan sequence, unlike the nearby regions or even the central Nepal domain. A fraction of convergence (~10-15%) is accommodated along the deep-seated MBT-ramp, most likely merging into the MHT. This finding is crucial for a rigorous assessment of the overall level of tectonic activity in the Himalayan morphotectonic provinces as it contradicts recently-published geodetic shortening estimates. In these studies, it has been proposed that the total Himalayan shortening in the NW Himalaya is accommodated within the Sub-Himalaya whereas no tectonic activity is assigned to the MBT.show moreshow less
  • Die sich verändernde Massenverteilung in einem Gebirge kann zu einer variierenden Sedimentablagerung führen, welche in Folge die Spannungszustände und Verwerfungsaktivitäten beeinflusst. Eine der herausforderndsten Aufgaben im Verständnis der Evolution aktiver Gebirge wie dem Himalaja, ist die Unterscheidung der verschiedenen treibenden Mechanismen wie der Variation im Sedimentfluss und der tektonischen Aktivitäten in Raum und Zeit. Der Himalaja ist einer der bedeutendsten känozoischen Gebirgszüge, der durch die Kollision zwischen der nordwärts wandernden indischen Platte und der eurasischen Kontinentalplatte vor 55-50 Ma entstand. Die anhaltende Konvergenz der beiden tektonischen Platten wird durch Verwerfungen und Auffaltungen innerhalb des bogenförmigen Gebirges aufgenommen, aber auch durch das fortwährende laterale und vertikale Wachstum des Tibetischen Plateaus, der angegliederten Gebirgszüge und den Gebirgsregionen weiter nördlich. Das Gebirgswachstum zeigt sich durch die Entwicklung von aufeinanderfolgenden in südlicherDie sich verändernde Massenverteilung in einem Gebirge kann zu einer variierenden Sedimentablagerung führen, welche in Folge die Spannungszustände und Verwerfungsaktivitäten beeinflusst. Eine der herausforderndsten Aufgaben im Verständnis der Evolution aktiver Gebirge wie dem Himalaja, ist die Unterscheidung der verschiedenen treibenden Mechanismen wie der Variation im Sedimentfluss und der tektonischen Aktivitäten in Raum und Zeit. Der Himalaja ist einer der bedeutendsten känozoischen Gebirgszüge, der durch die Kollision zwischen der nordwärts wandernden indischen Platte und der eurasischen Kontinentalplatte vor 55-50 Ma entstand. Die anhaltende Konvergenz der beiden tektonischen Platten wird durch Verwerfungen und Auffaltungen innerhalb des bogenförmigen Gebirges aufgenommen, aber auch durch das fortwährende laterale und vertikale Wachstum des Tibetischen Plateaus, der angegliederten Gebirgszüge und den Gebirgsregionen weiter nördlich. Das Gebirgswachstum zeigt sich durch die Entwicklung von aufeinanderfolgenden in südlicher Richtung verkippten Verwerfungssystemen. Von Norden nach Süden unterteilen die Hauptstörungen Main Central Thrust (MCT), Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) und Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) den Himalaja in verschiedene morphotektonische Bereiche. Die anwachsende Topographie interagiert mit den feuchten Monsunwinden was zu einem ausgeprägten Regen-, Verwitterung-, Erosion- und Sedimenttransportgradienten zum Vorland hin und darüber hinaus führt. In den intermontanen Tälern, der tiefgelegenen Ausläufern des Himalajas ist ein Teil dieser Sedimente eingeschlossen und vorübergehend gelagert. Das verbesserte Verständnis über die Entwicklung dieser Sedimentarchive bietet eine einmalige Möglichkeit die Auslöser der veränderlichen Sedimentproduktion, -anlieferung und -lagerung in einem sich aktiv deformierenden Gebirge über Raum und Zeit zu entschlüsseln und unterstützt dabei die Anstrengungen eine Verbindung zwischen Sedimentvolumen in intermontanen Becken und den Veränderungen des Spannungszustandes in geringfügiger Krustentiefe zu untersuchen. Die Sedimentumverteilung in Gebirgen kann, über einen Zeitraum von 102-104 Jahren, kulturelle Eigenheiten, die Infrastruktur in den intermontanen Tälern und sogar die Seismotektonik eines Gebirgsgürtels, beeinflussen. Es besteht ein verstärktes Interesse die Prozesse über die Sedimentführung und den kausalen Zusammenhang zwischen Tektonik, Klima und Topographie zu verstehen. An dieser Schnittstelle zwischen den tektonischen Prozessen und den überlagernden klimatischen und sedimentären Prozessen im Gebirgskeil setzten meine Untersuchungen an. Das Untersuchungsgebiet umfasst das intermontane Kangra-Becken im nordwestlichen Sub-Himalaja, da hier die Eigenschaften der verschiedenen morphotektonischen Gebieten des Himalajas gut ausgeprägt sind. Dieses Gebiet gehört zu einer Region, die stark durch den Monsun geprägt wird. Zahlreiche Flussterrassen bieten hervorragende Markierungen für die Beurteilung der Deformationsprozesse innerhalb des Himalajischen Gebirgskeils. Durch ihre Situation direkt vor der Dhauladhar-Kette ist die Region sowohl früher als auch heute durch ausgeprägte Erosionsgradienten und Sedimentprozessen charakterisiert, die den wiederholend wechselnden Klimabedingungen zugeordnet werden können. Angesichts dieser Bedingungen untersuchte ich in dieser tektonisch aktiven Region, klimatisch gesteuerte jungpleistozäne-holozäne Sedimentzyklen, welche sich möglicherweise als Auslöser für die tektonische Umorganisation innerhalb himalajischen Gebirgskeils verantwortlich zeichnen und zumindest seit dem frühen Holozän zu out-of-sequence Aufschiebungen führen. Das Kangra-Becken ist durch die MBT und den Jwalamukhi Thrust (JMT) im Sub-Himalaja nach Norden und Süden begrenzt und lagert vorübergehend aus der Dhauladhar-Kette angelieferte Sedimente. Im Becken sind ~200-m dicke Konglomerate abgelagert, welche zwei ausgeprägte Aggradationsphasen wiederspiegeln. Nachfolgend auf die Aggradationsphasen wurden mehrere Flussterrassen in die Schuttfächerablagerungen eingeschnitten. Die Datierung der Terrassenoberflächen mittels kosmogener 10Beryllium Nuklide ergab für die höchste erhaltene Terrasse ein Alter von 53.4±3.2 ka (AF1). Diese Oberfläche wurde daraufhin bis ~15 ka fortwährend eingeschnitten, bis sich ein zweiter Schuttfächer (AF2) zu bilden begann. Die Aufschüttung des AF2 wurde durch episodische holozäne Einschneidungen verdrängt, wobei sich mindestens vier Terrassenebenen bildeten. Wir haben eine Korrelation zwischen dem variierenden Sedimenttransport und ∂18O Aufzeichnungen aus Regionen, die vom indischen Sommermonsun (ISM) betroffen sind, gefunden. Die Aggradation fand wohl durch einen erhöhten Sedimentfluss während verstärkten Phasen des ISM und der Enteisung nach dem letzteiszeitlichen Maximum statt, wobei Perioden eines geschwächten ISM mit einem tieferen Sedimentzufluss verbunden sind und auch mit erneuten Einschneidungen zusammentreffen. Die Evolution fluvialer Terrassen entlang von sub-himaljischen Flüssen im Kangra-Sektor wurde auch durch tektonische Prozesse erzwungen. Rückwärts gekippte und gefaltete Terrassen dokumentieren deutlich die tektonische Aktivität der JMT. Der Versatz einer der Terrassenebenen weist auf eine Verkürzungsrate von 5.6±0.8 bis 7.5±1.0 mm.a-1 über die letzten ~10 ka hin. Darüber hinaus zeigt meine Studie, dass jungpleistozäne/holozäne out-of-sequence Aufschiebungen 40-60 % der gesamten 14.2±2 mm.a-1 Verkürzung aufgeteilt über den ganzen Sub-Himalaja hinweg aufnehmen. Die Aufzeichnungen an der JMT dokumentieren niedrigere Verkürzungsraten über längere Zeiträume, was auf out-of-sequence Aktivität im Sub-Himalaja hindeutet. Die erneute Aktivierung der JMT kann mit Veränderungen im tektonischen Spannungsfeld durch großflächigen Sedimenttransport aus dem Becken in Verbindung gebracht werden. Ich spekuliere daher darauf, dass die Deformationsprozesse im Sub-Himalaja sich entsprechend der Voraussagen des Modelles der kritischen Keilform verhalten und treffe folgende Annahmen: >200 m Sedimentaggradation würde eine gegen das Vorland gerichtete Ausbreitung der Deformationsfront, eine Wiedereinschneidung und die Beseitigung der meisten gelagerten Sedimente (beinahe 80-85 % der optimalen Beckenfüllung) auslösen. Daraus folgten wiederum sub-kritische Bedingungen der kritischen Keilformtheorie und der Rückzug der Deformationsfront würde somit ausgelöst. Während Erosionsproszesse und die damit verbundene Versteilung der Hänge über einen längeren Zeitraum der Tektonik zuzuschreiben sind, sind Sedimentzyklen in diesem Umfeld hauptsächlich das Resultat aus klimatischen Zwängen. Meine neuen Oberflächenexpositionsdaten aus kosmogenen Nukliden 10Be und die Zusammenstellung bisheriger Studien jungpleistozäner bis holozäner Flussterrassen und sowie alluviale Verfüllungen zeigen periodische Fluktuationen in der Sedimentanlieferung und der Transportkapazität in einem Zeitraum von 10³ bis 10⁵ Jahren. Um den möglichen Einfluss des Klimawandels auf diese Fluktuationen zu bewerten, habe ich den in den Schuttfächern und Terrassen aufgezeichneten zeitlichen Ablauf der Aggradations- und Einschneidungsphasen mit kontinentalen Klimaarchiven wie z. B. Speläotheme (stalagmiten) aus Monsun beeinflussten Nachbarregionen verglichen. Zusammen mit bisherigen publizierten OSL Altern, welche den Zeitpunkt der Aggradation anzeigen, finde ich eine Korrelation zwischen Variationen des Sedimenttransportes durch Sauerstoff-Isotopen Aufzeichnungen aus den von ISM betroffenen Gebieten. Dementsprechend kam es im Kangra-Becken während Zeiten der verstärkten Monsunintensität (Wechsel von trockenen, kalten und feuchten, warmen Perioden – MIS4 bis MIS3 und MIS2 bis MIS1) (MIS = marines Isotopenstadium) und der Enteisung des letzteiszeitlichen Maximums wahrscheinlich durch erhöhten Sedimentfluss zur Aggradation. Im Gegenzug stimmen schwache Perioden der Monsunintensität oder niedrigeren Sedimentlieferung mit der Wiedereinschneidung der bestehenden Becken überein. Zum Schluss enthält meine Studie einen Teil einer Tieftemperatur-Thermochronologie Studie, welche die jüngste Exhumationsgeschichte der Dhauladhar-Kette beurteilt. Zirkon-Helium (ZHe) Alter und publizierte Tieftemperatur-Daten (ZHe, Apatit-Spaltspuren (AFT)) dieses Höhenzuges belegen zusammen mit einer 3D thermokinematischen Modellierung (PECUBE) die Einschränkungen der Exhumation und der an die Gebirgskette gebundene MBT-Aktivität mindestens seit dem mittleren Miozän. Die Resultate der Modellierung deuten auf mittlere Gleitraten auf der MBT-Überschiebungsrampe von ~2–3 mm/yr seit ihrer Aktivierung hin. Dies führte zum Wachstum der >5-km hohen Front der Dhauladhar-Kette und einer kontinuierlichen, tiefsitzenden Exhumation und Erosion. Die erzielten Ergebnisse zeigen die Einschränkungen der Deformationsmuster und ihrer Variation entlang des Streichens. Die Resultate deuten auf eine Abwesenheit einer über die zeit-veränderlichen Rampe des basalen Abscherhorizontes in der mittleren Krustentiefe und einer Duplexbildung des Niederen Himalajas hin, dies im Gegensatz zu den nahegelegenen Gebieten oder sogar zu Zentralnepal. Ein Bruchteil der Konvergenz (~10-15%) wird entlang der tiefsitzenden MBT-Rampe aufgenommen, die aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach in die MHT übergeht. Diese Erkenntnis ist maßgeblich für eine gründliche Beurteilung der Gesamtgröße der tektonischen Aktivitäten in den morphotektonischen Provinzen des Himalajas, da sie kürzlich publizierten geodätischen Schätzungen von Verkürzungsraten widerspricht. In jenen Studien wurde vorgeschlagen, dass die gesamte Verkürzung des Gebirges im nordwestlichen Himalaja innerhalb des Sub-Himalajas aufgenommen wird, wobei der MBT keine tektonische Aktivität zugeschrieben werden wird.show moreshow less

Download full text files

  • dey_diss.pdfeng
    (10709KB)

    SHA-1:052487ca30cffc3cbcd252a0c6e3786540857613

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Saptarshi DeyGND
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-103390
Subtitle (English):a case study from the Kangra intermontane basin and the Dhauladhar range in the Northwestern Himalaya
Advisor:Manfred R. Strecker
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2016
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2016/12/21
Release Date:2017/02/21
Tag:Neotektonik; kosmogene Radionuklid-basierte Datierung; tektonische Geomorphologie
cosmogenic radionuclide-based dating; neotectonics; tectonic geomorphology
Pagenumber:xii, 118
RVK - Regensburg Classification:TG 3130
Funder:DFG-GRK1364
Funder:Research Focus Earth Sciences (RFES)
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
MSC Classification:86-XX GEOPHYSICS [See also 76U05, 76V05]
PACS Classification:90.00.00 GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS (for more detailed headings, see the Geophysics Appendix)
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht