• search hit 10 of 157
Back to Result List

The poetics of the real and aesthetics of the reel

  • The dissertation proposes that the spread of photography and popular cinema in 19th- and 20th-century-India have shaped an aesthetic and affective code integral to the reading and interpretation of Indian English novels, particularly when they address photography and/or cinema film, as in the case of the four corpus texts. In analyzing the nexus between ‘real’ and ‘reel’, the dissertation shows how the texts address the reader as media consumer and virtual image projector. Furthermore, the study discusses the Indian English novel against the backdrop of the cultural and medial transformations of the 20th century to elaborate how these influenced the novel’s aesthetics. Drawing upon reception aesthetics, the author devises the concept of the ‘implied spectator’ to analyze the aesthetic impact of the novels’ images as visual textures. No God in Sight (2005) by Altaf Tyrewala comprises of a string of 41 interior monologues, loosely connected through their narrators’ random encounters in Mumbai in the year 2000. Although marked byThe dissertation proposes that the spread of photography and popular cinema in 19th- and 20th-century-India have shaped an aesthetic and affective code integral to the reading and interpretation of Indian English novels, particularly when they address photography and/or cinema film, as in the case of the four corpus texts. In analyzing the nexus between ‘real’ and ‘reel’, the dissertation shows how the texts address the reader as media consumer and virtual image projector. Furthermore, the study discusses the Indian English novel against the backdrop of the cultural and medial transformations of the 20th century to elaborate how these influenced the novel’s aesthetics. Drawing upon reception aesthetics, the author devises the concept of the ‘implied spectator’ to analyze the aesthetic impact of the novels’ images as visual textures. No God in Sight (2005) by Altaf Tyrewala comprises of a string of 41 interior monologues, loosely connected through their narrators’ random encounters in Mumbai in the year 2000. Although marked by continuous perspective shifts, the text creates a sensation of acute immediacy. Here, the reader is addressed as implied spectator and is sutured into the narrated world like a film spectator ― an effect created through the use of continuity editing as a narrative technique. Similarly, Ruchir Joshi’s The Last Jet Engine Laugh (2002) coll(oc)ates disparate narrative perspectives and explores photography as an artistic practice, historiographic recorder and epistemological tool. The narrative appears guided by the random viewing of old photographs by the protagonist and primary narrator, the photographer Paresh Bhatt. However, it is the photographic negative and the practice of superimposition that render this string of episodes and different perspectives narratively consequential and cosmologically meaningful. Photography thus marks the perfect symbiosis of autobiography and historiography. Tabish Khair’s Filming. A Love Story (2007) immerses readers in the cine-aesthetic of 1930s and 40s Bombay film, the era in which the embedded plot is set. Plotline, central scenes and characters evoke the key films of Indian cinema history such as Satyajit Ray’s “Pather Panchali” or Raj Kapoor’s “Awara”. Ultimately, the text written as film dissolves the boundary between fiction and (narrated) reality, reel and real, thereby showing that the images of individual memory are inextricably intertwined with and shaped by collective memory. Ultimately, the reconstruction of the past as and through film(s) conquers trauma and endows the Partition of India as a historic experience of brutal contingency with meaning. The Bioscope Man (Indrajit Hazra, 2008) is a picaresque narrative set in Calcutta - India’s cultural capital and birthplace of Indian cinema at the beginning of the 20th century. The autodiegetic narrator Abani Chatterjee relates his rise and fall as silent film star, alternating between the modes of tell and show. He is both autodiegetic narrator and spectator or perceiving consciousness, seeing himself in his manifold screen roles. Beyond his film roles however, the narrator remains a void. The marked psychoanalytical symbolism of the text is accentuated by repeated invocations of dark caves and the laterna magica. Here too, ‘reel life’ mirrors and foreshadows real life as Indian and Bengali history again interlace with private history. Abani Chatterjee thus emerges as a quintessentially modern man of no qualities who assumes definitive shape only in the lost reels of the films he starred in. The final chapter argues that the static images and visual frames forwarded in the texts observe an integral psychological function: Premised upon linear perspective they imply a singular, static subjectivity appealing to the postmodern subject. In the corpus texts, the rise of digital technology in the 1990s thus appears not so much to have displaced older image repertories, practices and media techniques, than it has lent them greater visibility and appeal. Moreover, bricolage and pastiche emerge as cultural techniques which marked modernity from its inception. What the novels thus perpetuate is a media archeology not entirely servant to the poetics of the real. The permeable subject and the notion of the gaze as an active exchange as encapsulated in the concept of darshan - ideas informing all four texts - bespeak the resilience of a mythical universe continually re-instantiated in new technologies and uses. Eventually, the novels convey a sense of subalternity to a substantially Hindu nationalist history and historiography, the centrifugal force of which developed in the twentieth century and continues into the present.show moreshow less
  • Die Dissertation stellt die These auf, dass Photographie und Film im Indien des 19. und 20. Jhd. einen ästhetisch-affektiven Code geprägt haben, der für das Verständnis des Indisch-Englischen Romans von großer Bedeutung ist. Dies gilt umso mehr wenn diese Medien explizit thematisiert werden, so wie es hier der Fall ist. Indem die Verbindung zwischen Realem und (Foto-/Kino-) Film untersucht wird, zeigt die Forschungsarbeit, wie die Texte ihre Leser als Medienkonsumenten und virtuelle ‛Bildprojektoren’ ansprechen. Auf dem kritischen Ansatz der Rezeptionsästhetik aufbauend, entwickelt die Autorin das Konzept des 'impliziten Betrachters', um so die ästhetische Wirkung der Texte auf den Leser analysieren zu können. No God in Sight (2005) von Altaf Tyrewala ist eine Aneinanderreihung von 41 inneren Monologen, lose verbunden durch Zufallsbegegnungen im Mumbai des Jahres 2000. Obgleich von ständigen Perspektivwechseln geprägt, schafft der Text ein Gefühl unmittelbaren Erlebens. In seiner Funktion als impliziter Betrachter wird der LeserDie Dissertation stellt die These auf, dass Photographie und Film im Indien des 19. und 20. Jhd. einen ästhetisch-affektiven Code geprägt haben, der für das Verständnis des Indisch-Englischen Romans von großer Bedeutung ist. Dies gilt umso mehr wenn diese Medien explizit thematisiert werden, so wie es hier der Fall ist. Indem die Verbindung zwischen Realem und (Foto-/Kino-) Film untersucht wird, zeigt die Forschungsarbeit, wie die Texte ihre Leser als Medienkonsumenten und virtuelle ‛Bildprojektoren’ ansprechen. Auf dem kritischen Ansatz der Rezeptionsästhetik aufbauend, entwickelt die Autorin das Konzept des 'impliziten Betrachters', um so die ästhetische Wirkung der Texte auf den Leser analysieren zu können. No God in Sight (2005) von Altaf Tyrewala ist eine Aneinanderreihung von 41 inneren Monologen, lose verbunden durch Zufallsbegegnungen im Mumbai des Jahres 2000. Obgleich von ständigen Perspektivwechseln geprägt, schafft der Text ein Gefühl unmittelbaren Erlebens. In seiner Funktion als impliziter Betrachter wird der Leser hier quasi als Filmzuschauer in die erzählte Welt hineinprojiziert bzw. ‚vernäht‘. Dieser Effekt entsteht durch die Anwendung einer dem Film entlehnten Technik, dem ‚continuity editing‘. Auch Ruchir Joshi‘ The Last Jet Engine Laugh (2002) vereint widersprüchliche Erzählperspektiven. Der Roman beleuchtet Fotographie als künstlerische Praxis, historiographisches Speichermedium und epistemologisches Werkzeug. Das Narrativ erscheint allein durch die Betrachtung alter Fotos durch den Protagonist und primären Erzähler Paresh Bhatt gelenkt. Jedoch sind es das fotographische Negativ und die fotographische Überblendung, welche die disparaten Episoden und Perspektiven erzählerisch schlüssig und kosmologisch bedeutungsvoll machen. Mithin repräsentiert Fotographie hier die Symbiose von Autobiographie und Historiographie. Tabish Khairs Filming. A Love Story (2007) versetzt den Leser in die Welt des Bombay-Films der 1930er und 40er Jahre, in dem die Haupthandlung spielt. Handlung, Szenenbilder und selbst die Namen der Protagonisten verweisen unmittelbar auf Schlüsselfilme der indischen Filmgeschichte wie Satyajit Rays "Pather Panchali" oder Raj Kapoors "Awara".Geschrieben als Film, löst der Text die Grenze zwischen Fiktion und (erzählter) Realität, Film(-rolle) und Realem auf um zu zeigen, dass die individuellen Erinnerungsbilder unauflöslich mit der kollektiven Erinnerung verbunden sind und letztlich von ihr geprägt werden. Die Rekonstruktion der Vergangenheit als und durch (den) Film(e) überwindet schließlich das historische Trauma der Teilung Indiens in ihrer brutalen Sinnlosigkeit. The Bioscope Man (2008) ist ein pikaresker Roman und spielt zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts in Kalkutta, damals noch Indiens kulturelle Hauptstadt und Geburtsstätte des indischen Kinos. Abani Chatterjee erzählt abwechselnd als konventioneller autodiegetischer Erzähler und als Zuschauer bzw. wahrnehmendes Bewusstsein von seinem Aufstieg und Fall als Stummfilmstar. Jenseits seiner Rollen bleibt der Erzähler jedoch eine Leerstelle. Der psychoanalytische Symbolismus des Textes wird durch wiederholte Aufrufung der Motive der Höhle und der Laterna Magica hervorgehoben. Auch hier spiegelt das Leben auf der Filmrolle das ‚echte‘ Leben, indem indische und bengalische Geschichte mit der individuellen (Lebens-)Geschichte verwoben werden. Chatterjee ist letztlich Inbegriff des modernen Menschen, des ‚Mannes ohne Eigenschaften‘ der nur in den verschwundenen Filmen in denen er einst spielte konkrete Form annimmt. Das Schlusskapitel argumentiert, dass die in den Texten entworfenen Bilder eine essentielle psychologische Funktion erfüllen: Auf der Linearperspektive basierend implizieren sie eine singuläre, statische Subjektivität die auf die Leserin als postmodernes Subjekt ansprechend wirkt. In den Texten scheint der Aufstieg der digitalen Technik und ihrer Bildwelt ältere Bilder, visuelle Praktiken und Medientechniken weniger ersetzt, als ihnen größere Sichtbarkeit und Appeal verliehen zu haben. Weiterhin werden Bricolage und Pastiche als originär moderne (Kultur-)Techniken dargestellt. Die den Romanen inhärente Medienarchäologie untersteht daher nicht vollständig der Poetik des Realen. Die hinduistisch geprägten Ideen vom ‚durchlässigen‘ Subjekt und vom Sehen als aktivem Austausch wie es der Begriff „darshan“ konzeptualisiert, verweisen auf die Widerstandskraft eines mythischen Universums das sich in den neuen Technologien kontinuierlich fortpflanzt. Letztlich versinnlichen und versinnbildlichen die Romane die Hindu-nationalistisch geprägte Geschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts, deren Zentrifugalkraft in ihrer Exklusivität und Aggressivität bis heute nachwirkt.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author:Anna Maria Reimer
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-95660
Subtitle (English):medial visuality in the contemporary Indian English novel
Advisor:Dirk Wiemann, Lars Eckstein
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2015
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2015/07/08
Release Date:2016/10/10
Tag:Intermedialität; Medienwissenschaft; indisch-englischer Roman; indisches Kino; postkoloniale englische Literaturen
Awara; Filming. A Love Story; Hindi film; Indian English novel; Indian cinema; No God in Sight; Pather Panchali; The Bioscope Man; The Last Jet Engine Laugh; implied spectator; media anthropology; media studies; phenomenology; photography; postcolonial literatures in English; rasadhvani; reception aesthetics; suture; visual culture; visual textures
Pagenumber:298
RVK - Regensburg Classification:HQ 6067, HQ 6040
Organizational units:Philosophische Fakultät / Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik
Dewey Decimal Classification:8 Literatur / 82 Englische, altenglische Literaturen / 820 Englische, altenglische Literaturen
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, Nicht kommerziell, Weitergabe zu gleichen Bedingungen 4.0 International