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Saccade-target selection of dyslexic children when reading Chinese

  • This study investigates the eye movements of dyslexic children and their age-matched controls when reading Chinese. Dyslexic children exhibited more and longer fixations than age-matched control children, and an increase of word length resulted in a greater increase in the number of fixations and gaze durations for the dyslexic than for the control readers. The report focuses on the finding that there was a significant difference between the two groups in the fixation landing position as a function of word length in single-fixation cases, while there was no such difference in the initial fixation of multi-fixation cases. We also found that both groups had longer incoming saccade amplitudes while the launch sites were closer to the word in single fixation cases than in multi-fixation cases. Our results suggest that dyslexic children's inefficient lexical processing, in combination with the absence of orthographic word boundaries in Chinese, leads them to select saccade targets at the beginning of words conservatively. These findingsThis study investigates the eye movements of dyslexic children and their age-matched controls when reading Chinese. Dyslexic children exhibited more and longer fixations than age-matched control children, and an increase of word length resulted in a greater increase in the number of fixations and gaze durations for the dyslexic than for the control readers. The report focuses on the finding that there was a significant difference between the two groups in the fixation landing position as a function of word length in single-fixation cases, while there was no such difference in the initial fixation of multi-fixation cases. We also found that both groups had longer incoming saccade amplitudes while the launch sites were closer to the word in single fixation cases than in multi-fixation cases. Our results suggest that dyslexic children's inefficient lexical processing, in combination with the absence of orthographic word boundaries in Chinese, leads them to select saccade targets at the beginning of words conservatively. These findings provide further evidence for parafoveal word segmentation during reading of Chinese sentences.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Jinger Pan, Ming YanORCiDGND, Jochen LaubrockORCiDGND, Hua Shu, Reinhold KlieglORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2014.01.014
ISSN:0042-6989 (print)
ISSN:1878-5646 (online)
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=24508073
Parent Title (English):Vision research : an international journal for functional aspects of vision.
Publisher:Elsevier
Place of publication:Oxford
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2014
Year of Completion:2014
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Chinese; Dyslexic children; Eye movements; Reading; Saccade-target selection
Volume:97
Pagenumber:7
First Page:24
Last Page:30
Funder:National Key Basic Research Program of China [2014CB846103]; Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungsprojekt [GZ 633]; DFG Project [KL 955/18]
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Psychologie
Peer Review:Referiert