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Rupture process of the Lorca (southeast Spain) 11 May 2011 (M (w)=5.1) earthquake

  • On 11 May 2011, a M (w) = 5.1 earthquake shook the town of Lorca (SE Spain) causing a disproportionately large damage for its magnitude. In order to contribute to knowledge of the behavior of the active faults present in the region and define the parameters which control their motion, we made a detailed study of the rupture process of this earthquake from inversion of body waves at regional and teleseismic distances. Ground motion displacements obtained in this way are in agreement with near-field strong motion data and GPS observations recorded in Lorca. We have obtained a partly bilateral rupture propagating to WSW (238A degrees, 54A degrees, 59A degrees) with 27 cm of maximum slip and shallow focus (4 km). The fault plane orientation corresponds to that of the Cejo de los Enamorados Fault located NE of the Lorca town and parallel to the Alhama de Murcia Fault. The distribution of slip on the fault plane can explain the lack of any observed surface rupture as we found that the rupture started at 4-km depth along a plane dipping atOn 11 May 2011, a M (w) = 5.1 earthquake shook the town of Lorca (SE Spain) causing a disproportionately large damage for its magnitude. In order to contribute to knowledge of the behavior of the active faults present in the region and define the parameters which control their motion, we made a detailed study of the rupture process of this earthquake from inversion of body waves at regional and teleseismic distances. Ground motion displacements obtained in this way are in agreement with near-field strong motion data and GPS observations recorded in Lorca. We have obtained a partly bilateral rupture propagating to WSW (238A degrees, 54A degrees, 59A degrees) with 27 cm of maximum slip and shallow focus (4 km). The fault plane orientation corresponds to that of the Cejo de los Enamorados Fault located NE of the Lorca town and parallel to the Alhama de Murcia Fault. The distribution of slip on the fault plane can explain the lack of any observed surface rupture as we found that the rupture started at 4-km depth along a plane dipping at 54A degrees, with motion propagating upward to stop at 1.5 km below the surface. The strong motion and GPS data recorded near the epicenter are in agreement with the maximum slip on the fault. Directivity effects and the extreme shallowness of the rupture could explain the considerable damage that the earthquake caused in the town of Lorca.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:C. Pro, E. Buforn, Simone Cesca, C. Sanz de Galdeano, A. Udias
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10950-014-9421-8
ISSN:1383-4649 (print)
ISSN:1573-157X (online)
Parent Title (English):Journal of seismology
Publisher:Springer
Place of publication:Dordrecht
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2014
Year of Completion:2014
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Directivity; Ground motion and GPS; Seismic slip distribution
Volume:18
Issue:3
Pagenumber:15
First Page:481
Last Page:495
Funder:Project ALERT-ES, Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (MICINN), Spain [CGL2010-19803-C03-01]
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Peer Review:Referiert