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Land use intensification alters ecosystem multifunctionality via loss of biodiversity and changes to functional composition

  • Global change, especially land-use intensification, affects human well-being by impacting the delivery of multiple ecosystem services (multifunctionality). However, whether biodiversity loss is a major component of global change effects on multifunctionality in real-world ecosystems, as in experimental ones, remains unclear. Therefore, we assessed biodiversity, functional composition and 14 ecosystem services on 150 agricultural grasslands differing in land-use intensity. We also introduce five multifunctionality measures in which ecosystem services were weighted according to realistic land-use objectives. We found that indirect land-use effects, i.e. those mediated by biodiversity loss and by changes to functional composition, were as strong as direct effects on average. Their strength varied with land-use objectives and regional context. Biodiversity loss explained indirect effects in a region of intermediate productivity and was most damaging when land-use objectives favoured supporting and cultural services. In contrast,Global change, especially land-use intensification, affects human well-being by impacting the delivery of multiple ecosystem services (multifunctionality). However, whether biodiversity loss is a major component of global change effects on multifunctionality in real-world ecosystems, as in experimental ones, remains unclear. Therefore, we assessed biodiversity, functional composition and 14 ecosystem services on 150 agricultural grasslands differing in land-use intensity. We also introduce five multifunctionality measures in which ecosystem services were weighted according to realistic land-use objectives. We found that indirect land-use effects, i.e. those mediated by biodiversity loss and by changes to functional composition, were as strong as direct effects on average. Their strength varied with land-use objectives and regional context. Biodiversity loss explained indirect effects in a region of intermediate productivity and was most damaging when land-use objectives favoured supporting and cultural services. In contrast, functional composition shifts, towards fast-growing plant species, strongly increased provisioning services in more inherently unproductive grasslands.show moreshow less

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Author:Eric Allan, Pete Manning, Fabian Alt, Julia Binkenstein, Stefan Blaser, Nico Blüthgen, Stefan Böhm, Fabrice Grassein, Norbert Hölzel, Valentin H. Klaus, Till Kleinebecker, E. Kathryn Morris, Yvonne Oelmann, Daniel Prati, Swen C. Renner, Matthias C. Rillig, Martin Schaefer, Michael Schloter, Barbara Schmitt, Ingo Schöning, Marion Schrumpf, Emily Solly, Elisabeth Sorkau, Juliane Steckel, Ingolf Steffen-Dewenter, Barbara Stempfhuber, Marco Tschapka, Christiane N. Weiner, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Michael Werner, Catrin Westphal, Wolfgang Wilcke, Markus Fischer
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12469
ISSN:1461-023X (print)
ISSN:1461-0248 (online)
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=26096863
Parent Title (English):Ecology letters
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication:Hoboken
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2015
Year of Completion:2015
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning; ecosystem services; global change; land use; multifunctionality
Volume:18
Issue:8
Pagenumber:10
First Page:834
Last Page:843
Funder:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Priority Program 1374
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Biochemie und Biologie
Peer Review:Referiert