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Relationship between strength; balance and mobility in children aged 7-10 years

  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between variables of lower extremity muscle strength, balance, and mobility assessed under various task conditions. Twenty-one healthy children (mean age: 9 +/- 1 years) were tested for their isometric and dynamic strength as well as for their steady-state, proactive, and reactive balance and mobility. Balance and mobility tests were conducted under single and dual task conditions. Significant positive correlations were detected between measures of isometric and dynamic leg muscle strength. Hardly any significant associations were observed between variables of strength and balance/mobility and between measures of steady-state, proactive, and reactive balance. Additionally, no significant correlations were detected between balance/mobility tests performed under single and dual task conditions. The predominately non-significant correlations between different balance components and mobility imply that balance and mobility performance is task specific. Further, strength andThe purpose of this study was to investigate the association between variables of lower extremity muscle strength, balance, and mobility assessed under various task conditions. Twenty-one healthy children (mean age: 9 +/- 1 years) were tested for their isometric and dynamic strength as well as for their steady-state, proactive, and reactive balance and mobility. Balance and mobility tests were conducted under single and dual task conditions. Significant positive correlations were detected between measures of isometric and dynamic leg muscle strength. Hardly any significant associations were observed between variables of strength and balance/mobility and between measures of steady-state, proactive, and reactive balance. Additionally, no significant correlations were detected between balance/mobility tests performed under single and dual task conditions. The predominately non-significant correlations between different balance components and mobility imply that balance and mobility performance is task specific. Further, strength and balance/mobility as well as balance under single and dual task conditions seem to be independent of each other and may have to be tested and trained complementarily.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Thomas MuehlbauerORCiDGND, Carmen Besemer, Anja Wehrle, Albert Gollhofer, Urs GranacherORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2012.06.022
ISSN:0966-6362 (print)
Parent Title (English):Gait & posture
Publisher:Elsevier
Place of publication:Clare
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2013
Year of Completion:2013
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:Cognitive/motor interference; Jumping height; Maximal isometric force; Proactive/reactive balance; Single/dual tasking; Steady-state balance
Volume:37
Issue:1
Pagenumber:5
First Page:108
Last Page:112
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportmedizin und Prävention
Peer Review:Referiert