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Control processes during selective long-term memory retrieval

  • In our daily life, we often need to selectively remember information related to the same retrieval cue in a consecutive manner (e.g., ingredients from a recipe). To investigate such selection processes during cued long-term memory (LTM) retrieval, we used a paradigm in which the retrieval demands were systematically varied from trial to trial and analyzed, by means of behavior and slow cortical EEG potentials (SCPs), the retrieval processes in the current trial depending on those of the previous trial. We varied whether the retrieval cue, the type of to-be-retrieved association (feature), or retrieval load was repeated or changed from trial to trial. The behavioral data revealed a benefit of feature repetition, probably due to trial-by-trial feature priming. SCPs further showed an effect of cue change with a mid-frontal maximum, suggesting increased control demands when the cue was repeated, as well as a parietal effect of retrieval-load change, indicating increased activation of posterior neural resources when focusing on a singleIn our daily life, we often need to selectively remember information related to the same retrieval cue in a consecutive manner (e.g., ingredients from a recipe). To investigate such selection processes during cued long-term memory (LTM) retrieval, we used a paradigm in which the retrieval demands were systematically varied from trial to trial and analyzed, by means of behavior and slow cortical EEG potentials (SCPs), the retrieval processes in the current trial depending on those of the previous trial. We varied whether the retrieval cue, the type of to-be-retrieved association (feature), or retrieval load was repeated or changed from trial to trial. The behavioral data revealed a benefit of feature repetition, probably due to trial-by-trial feature priming. SCPs further showed an effect of cue change with a mid-frontal maximum, suggesting increased control demands when the cue was repeated, as well as a parietal effect of retrieval-load change, indicating increased activation of posterior neural resources when focusing on a single association after all learned associations had been activated previously, compared to staying with single associations across trials. These effects suggest the existence of two distinct types of dynamic (trial-by-trial) control processes during LTM retrieval: (1) medial frontal processes that monitor or regulate interference within a set of activated associations, and (2) posterior processes regulating attention to LTM representations. The present study demonstrates that processes mediating selective LTM retrieval can be successfully studied by manipulating the history of processing demands in trial sequences.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:J. M. Kizilirmak, Frank Rösler, P. H. Khader
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.08.041
ISSN:1053-8119 (print)
Parent Title (English):NeuroImage : a journal of brain function
Publisher:Elsevier
Place of publication:San Diego
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2012
Year of Completion:2012
Release Date:2017/03/26
Tag:Cognitive control; ERPs; Long-term memory; Retrieval; SCPs; Selection processes
Volume:59
Issue:2
Pagenumber:12
First Page:1830
Last Page:1841
Funder:German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) [KH 235/1-1]
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Psychologie
Peer Review:Referiert