How do children organize their speech in the first years of life?

  • Purpose: This study reports on a cross-sectional investigation of lingual coarticulation in 57 typically developing German children (4 cohorts from 3.5 to 7 years of age) as compared with 12 adults. It examines whether the organization of lingual gestures for intrasyllabic coarticulation differs as a function of age and consonantal context. Method: Using the technique of ultrasound imaging, we recorded movement of the tongue articulator during the production of pseudowords, including various vocalic and consonantal contexts. Results: Results from linear mixed-effects models show greater lingual coarticulation in all groups of children as compared with adults with a significant decrease from the kindergarten years (at ages 3, 4, and 5 years) to the end of the 1st year into primary school (at age 7 years). Additional differences in coarticulation degree were found across and within age groups as a function of the onset consonant identity (/b/, / d/, and /g/). Conclusions: Results support the view that, although coarticulation degreePurpose: This study reports on a cross-sectional investigation of lingual coarticulation in 57 typically developing German children (4 cohorts from 3.5 to 7 years of age) as compared with 12 adults. It examines whether the organization of lingual gestures for intrasyllabic coarticulation differs as a function of age and consonantal context. Method: Using the technique of ultrasound imaging, we recorded movement of the tongue articulator during the production of pseudowords, including various vocalic and consonantal contexts. Results: Results from linear mixed-effects models show greater lingual coarticulation in all groups of children as compared with adults with a significant decrease from the kindergarten years (at ages 3, 4, and 5 years) to the end of the 1st year into primary school (at age 7 years). Additional differences in coarticulation degree were found across and within age groups as a function of the onset consonant identity (/b/, / d/, and /g/). Conclusions: Results support the view that, although coarticulation degree decreases with age, children do not organize consecutive articulatory gestures with a uniform organizational scheme (e.g., segmental or syllabic). Instead, results suggest that coarticulatory organization is sensitive to the underlying articulatory properties of the segments combined.show moreshow less

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Author details:Aude NoirayORCiDGND, Dzhuma Abakarova, Elina RubertusORCiD, Stella Krüger, Mark TiedeORCiD
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0148
ISSN:1092-4388
ISSN:1558-9102
Pubmed ID:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=29799996
Title of parent work (English):Journal of speech, language, and hearing research
Subtitle (English):insight from ultrasound imaging
Publisher:American Speech-Language-Hearing Assoc.
Place of publishing:Rockville
Publication type:Article
Language:English
Date of first publication:2018/06/19
Completion year:2018
Release date:2021/11/25
Volume:61
Issue:6
Number of pages:14
First page:1355
Last Page:1368
Funding institution:Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftGerman Research Foundation (DFG) [1098, 255676067]
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Strukturbereich Kognitionswissenschaften / Department Linguistik
DDC classification:4 Sprache / 41 Linguistik / 410 Linguistik
Peer review:Referiert
Publishing method:Open Access / Green Open-Access