Understanding the dynamics of radiation belt electrons by means of data assimilation

Verständnis der Dynamik von Strahlungsgürtel-Elektronen durch Datenassimilation

  • The Earth's electron radiation belts exhibit a two-zone structure, with the outer belt being highly dynamic due to the constant competition between a number of physical processes, including acceleration, loss, and transport. The flux of electrons in the outer belt can vary over several orders of magnitude, reaching levels that may disrupt satellite operations. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that drive these variations is of high interest to the scientific community. In particular, the important role played by loss mechanisms in controlling relativistic electron dynamics has become increasingly clear in recent years. It is now widely accepted that radiation belt electrons can be lost either by precipitation into the atmosphere or by transport across the magnetopause, called magnetopause shadowing. Precipitation of electrons occurs due to pitch-angle scattering by resonant interaction with various types of waves, including whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. In addition, theThe Earth's electron radiation belts exhibit a two-zone structure, with the outer belt being highly dynamic due to the constant competition between a number of physical processes, including acceleration, loss, and transport. The flux of electrons in the outer belt can vary over several orders of magnitude, reaching levels that may disrupt satellite operations. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that drive these variations is of high interest to the scientific community. In particular, the important role played by loss mechanisms in controlling relativistic electron dynamics has become increasingly clear in recent years. It is now widely accepted that radiation belt electrons can be lost either by precipitation into the atmosphere or by transport across the magnetopause, called magnetopause shadowing. Precipitation of electrons occurs due to pitch-angle scattering by resonant interaction with various types of waves, including whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. In addition, the compression of the magnetopause due to increases in solar wind dynamic pressure can substantially deplete electrons at high L shells where they find themselves in open drift paths, whereas electrons at low L shells can be lost through outward radial diffusion. Nevertheless, the role played by each physical process during electron flux dropouts still remains a fundamental puzzle. Differentiation between these processes and quantification of their relative contributions to the evolution of radiation belt electrons requires high-resolution profiles of phase space density (PSD). However, such profiles of PSD are difficult to obtain due to restrictions of spacecraft observations to a single measurement in space and time, which is also compounded by the inaccuracy of instruments. Data assimilation techniques aim to blend incomplete and inaccurate spaceborne data with physics-based models in an optimal way. In the Earth's radiation belts, it is used to reconstruct the entire radial profile of electron PSD, and it has become an increasingly important tool in validating our current understanding of radiation belt dynamics, identifying new physical processes, and predicting the near-Earth hazardous radiation environment. In this study, sparse measurements from Van Allen Probes A and B and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) 13 and 15 are assimilated into the three-dimensional Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB-3D) diffusion model, by means of a split-operator Kalman filter over a four-year period from 01 October 2012 to 01 October 2016. In comparison to previous works, the 3D model accounts for more physical processes, namely mixed pitch angle-energy diffusion, scattering by EMIC waves, and magnetopause shadowing. It is shown how data assimilation, by means of the innovation vector (the residual between observations and model forecast), can be used to account for missing physics in the model. This method is used to identify the radial distances from the Earth and the geomagnetic conditions where the model is inconsistent with the measured PSD for different values of the adiabatic invariants mu and K. As a result, the Kalman filter adjusts the predictions in order to match the observations, and this is interpreted as evidence of where and when additional source or loss processes are active. Furthermore, two distinct loss mechanisms responsible for the rapid dropouts of radiation belt electrons are investigated: EMIC wave-induced scattering and magnetopause shadowing. The innovation vector is inspected for values of the invariant mu ranging from 300 to 3000 MeV/G, and a statistical analysis is performed to quantitatively assess the effect of both processes as a function of various geomagnetic indices, solar wind parameters, and radial distance from the Earth. The results of this work are in agreement with previous studies that demonstrated the energy dependence of these two mechanisms. EMIC wave scattering dominates loss at lower L shells and it may amount to between 10%/hr to 30%/hr of the maximum value of PSD over all L shells for fixed first and second adiabatic invariants. On the other hand, magnetopause shadowing is found to deplete electrons across all energies, mostly at higher L shells, resulting in loss from 50%/hr to 70%/hr of the maximum PSD. Nevertheless, during times of enhanced geomagnetic activity, both processes can operate beyond such location and encompass the entire outer radiation belt. The results of this study are two-fold. Firstly, it demonstrates that the 3D data assimilative code provides a comprehensive picture of the radiation belts and is an important step toward performing reanalysis using observations from current and future missions. Secondly, it achieves a better understanding and provides critical clues of the dominant loss mechanisms responsible for the rapid dropouts of electrons at different locations over the outer radiation belt.show moreshow less
  • Die Elektronenstrahlungsgürtel der Erde weisen eine Zwei-Zonen-Struktur auf, wobei der äußere Gürtel aufgrund des ständigen Zusammenspiels zwischen einer Reihe von physikalischen Prozessen, einschließlich Beschleunigung, Verlust und Transport, eine hohe Dynamik aufweist. Der Elektronenfluss im äußeren Gürtel kann über mehrere Größenordnungen variieren und Werte erreichen, die den Satellitenbetrieb stören können. Daher ist das Verständnis der Mechanismen, die diese Variabilität bewirken, von hohem Interesse für die wissenschaftliche Gemeinschaft. Insbesondere die wichtige Rolle die Verlustmechanismen bei der Kontrolle der relativistischen Elektronendynamik spielen ist in den letzten Jahren immer deutlicher geworden. Es ist inzwischen weithin anerkannt, dass Strahlungsgürtelelektronen entweder durch Interaktion mit der Atmosphäre oder durch Transport über die Magnetopause, das so genannte Magnetopauseshadowing, verloren gehen können. Der Verlust von Elektronen in der Atmosphäre erfolgt aufgrund von Pitchwinkelstreuung durch resonanteDie Elektronenstrahlungsgürtel der Erde weisen eine Zwei-Zonen-Struktur auf, wobei der äußere Gürtel aufgrund des ständigen Zusammenspiels zwischen einer Reihe von physikalischen Prozessen, einschließlich Beschleunigung, Verlust und Transport, eine hohe Dynamik aufweist. Der Elektronenfluss im äußeren Gürtel kann über mehrere Größenordnungen variieren und Werte erreichen, die den Satellitenbetrieb stören können. Daher ist das Verständnis der Mechanismen, die diese Variabilität bewirken, von hohem Interesse für die wissenschaftliche Gemeinschaft. Insbesondere die wichtige Rolle die Verlustmechanismen bei der Kontrolle der relativistischen Elektronendynamik spielen ist in den letzten Jahren immer deutlicher geworden. Es ist inzwischen weithin anerkannt, dass Strahlungsgürtelelektronen entweder durch Interaktion mit der Atmosphäre oder durch Transport über die Magnetopause, das so genannte Magnetopauseshadowing, verloren gehen können. Der Verlust von Elektronen in der Atmosphäre erfolgt aufgrund von Pitchwinkelstreuung durch resonante Wechselwirkung mit verschiedenen Arten von magnetosphärischen Wellen, einschließlich plasmasphärischem Hiss, Whistler-Mode-Chorus, und elektromagnetischen Ionenzyklotron-Wellen (EMIC). Darüber hinaus kann die Komprimierung der Magnetopause aufgrund der Erhöhungen des dynamischen Drucks des Sonnenwindes dazu führen, dass Elektronen an hohen L-Shells, wo sie sich in offenen Driftpfaden befinden, erheblich in ihrer Dichte reduziert werden, während Elektronen an niedrigen L-Shells durch radiale Diffusion nach außen verloren gehen können. Nichtsdestotrotz bleibt die Rolle, die jeder physikalische Prozess bei der schnellen Reduktion des Elektronenflusses spielt, nach wie vor ein grundlegendes Rätsel. Die Unterscheidung zwischen diesen Prozessen und die Quantifizierung ihrer relativen Beiträge zur Entwicklung der Strahlungsgürtelelektronen erfordert hochauflösende Profile der Phasenraumdichte (PSD). Solche Profile der PSD sind jedoch schwierig zu bestimmen, da die Beobachtungen von Raumfahrzeugen auf eine einzige Messung in Raum und Zeit beschränkt sind, was auch durch die Ungenauigkeit der Instrumente erschwert wird. Datenassimilationstechniken zielen darauf ab, unvollständige und ungenaue raumgestützte Daten mit physikalisch basierten Modellen auf optimale Weise zu kombinieren. In den Strahlungsgürteln der Erde werden sie verwendet, um das gesamte radiale Profil der Elektronen-PSD zu rekonstruieren, und sie sind zu einem immer wichtigeren Werkzeug geworden, um unser derzeitiges Verständnis der Dynamik der Strahlungsgürtel zu validieren, neue physikalische Prozesse zu identifizieren und die erdnahe gefährliche Strahlungsumgebung vorherzusagen. In dieser Studie werden Messungen der Van-Allen-Probes A und B und der Geostationary-Operational-Environmental-Satellites (GOES) 13 und 15 mit Hilfe eines Split-Operator-Kalman-Filters über einen Zeitraum von vier Jahren vom 01. Oktober 2012 bis zum 01. Oktober 2016 in das dreidimensionale Versatile Electron Radiation Belt-3D-Diffusionsmodell (VERB-3D) integriert. Im Vergleich zu früheren Arbeiten berücksichtigt das 3D-Modell mehr physikalische Prozesse, nämlich gemischte Diffusion, Streuung durch EMIC-Wellen und Magnetopausenverluste. Es wird gezeigt, wie die Datenassimilation mit Hilfe des Innovationsvektors (des Residuums zwischen Beobachtungen und Modellprognose), genutzt werden kann, um fehlende physikalische Prozesse im Modell zu berücksichtigen. Diese Methode wird verwendet, um die radialen Entfernungen von der Erde und die geomagnetischen Bedingungen zu identifizieren, bei denen unser Modell für verschiedene Werte der adiabatischen Invarianten mu und K nicht mit der gemessenen PSD übereinstimmt. Infolgedessen passt der Kalman-Filter die Vorhersagen an die Beobachtungen an, und dies wird als Nachweis dafür interpretiert, wo und wann zusätzliche Quellen- oder Verlustprozesse aktiv sind. Darüber hinaus werden zwei unterschiedliche Verlustmechanismen untersucht, die für die schnellen Verluste von Strahlungsgürtelelektronen verantwortlich sind: EMIC-Wellen-induzierte Streuung und Magnetopausenverluste. Der Innovationsvektor wird bei Werten der Invariante mu im Bereich von 300 bis 3000 MeV/G untersucht, und es wird eine statistische Analyse durchgeführt, um die Wirkung beider Prozesse in Abhängigkeit von verschiedenen geomagnetischen Indizes, Sonnenwindparametern und der radialen Entfernung von der Erde quantitativ zu bewerten. Die Ergebnisse dieser Arbeit stehen in Übereinstimmung mit früheren Studien, die die Energieabhängigkeit dieser beiden Mechanismen nachgewiesen haben. Die EMIC-Wellenstreuung dominiert den Verlust bei niedrigen L-Shells und kann zwi-schen 10%/hr bis 30%/hr des Maximalwertes der PSD über alle L-Shells für feste Werte der ersten und zweiten adiabatische Invarianten betragen. Andererseits wird festgestellt, dass bei den Magnetopausenverlusten über alle Energien hinweg, meist bei höheren L-Shells, Elektronen Verluste zeigen, was zu einer Verstärkung des Verlustes von 50%/hr auf 70%/hr der maximalen PSD führt. Nichtsdestotrotz können beide Prozesse in Zeiten erhöhter geomagnetischer Aktivität über diese L-Shells hinaus wirken und den gesamten äußeren Strahlungsgürtel umfassen. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie sind zweifacher Art. Erstens zeigt sie, dass der 3D-Daten-Assimilationscode ein umfassendes Bild der Strahlungsgürtel liefert und ein wichtiger Schritt zur Durchführung einer Reanalyse unter Verwendung von Beobachtungen aus aktuellen und zukünftigen Missionen ist. Zweitens erreicht er ein besseres Verständnis und liefert entscheidende Hinweise auf die vorherrschenden Verlustmechanismen, die für die schnellen Verluste von Elektronen an verschiedenen Orten im äußeren Strahlungsgürtel verantwortlich sind.show moreshow less

Download full text files

  • SHA-512:bec65dd941c9cdcbab4644f1094a6d16010b65c4719a2e2eb598da8f54d0ea923c1e4ca6decc99713cfaf3f398b3046b56567aca680195ebbc12dcef0d26997f

Export metadata

Metadaten
Author details:Juan Sebastian Cervantes VillaORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-519827
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25932/publishup-51982
Reviewer(s):Reiner Friedel, Drew TurnerORCiD, Minna PalmrothORCiD
Supervisor(s):Yuri Shprits, Reiner Friedel
Publication type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Date of first publication:2021/10/13
Completion year:2021
Publishing institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2021/08/30
Release date:2021/10/13
Tag:Datenassimilation; Kalman-Filter; Phasenraumdichte; Strahlungsgürtel; magnetosphärischen Wellen
Kalman filter; data assimilation; magnetospheric waves; phase space density; radiation belts
Number of pages:xxv, 116
RVK - Regensburg classification:UT 2100, UR 7000, SK 955
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Physik und Astronomie
DDC classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 52 Astronomie / 520 Astronomie und zugeordnete Wissenschaften
MSC classification:85-XX ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS (For celestial mechanics, see 70F15) / 85Axx Astronomy and astrophysics (For celestial mechanics, see 70F15) / 85A04 General
License (German):License LogoCC BY - Namensnennung, 4.0 International